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AUTHOR: 



RYE, WALTER 



TITLE: 



CARROW ABBEY, 
OTHERWISE CARROW 



PLACE: 



NORWICH 



DA TE : 



1889 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 
PRESERVATION DEPARTMENT 

BIBLIOGRAP HIC MICROFORM TARGET 



Original Material as Filmed - Existing Bibliographic Record 



Master Negative # 



932.042 

0237 j^yQ^ V.'alter, 1043-19 09. 

Q Carrow abb'^y, otJier-.vise Carron priory nenr ?!or- 
wich in the county of Morfolk: itn foundations, 
builiiin^^s, officers u inmates, v/ith appendices, 
churtorst proceedings, extracts fron wills, Ir.ndcd 
posseasiona, founders, architecturnl description 
of the remains of the buildinfs and oonc account 
of the family of the present owners ••• Nor.vich, 
Goose, lfl09. 

iv, 52, 1x1 p, platos,30 cm. 

One of ninety cop ioa printed. 



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CARROW ABBEY 



OTHERWISE CARROW PRIORY 



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Carrow Abbey, 



Otherwife Carrow Priory ; 



Near Norwich, in the County of Norfolk 



ITS FOUNDATION, BUILDINGS, 
OFFICERS, & INMATES. 

CHARTERS, PROCEEDINGS, EXTRACTS FROM WILLS, LANDED POSSESSIONS, 
FOUNDERS, ARCHITECTURAL DESCRIPTION OF THE REMAINS OF THE 
BUILDINGS. AND SOME ACCOUNT OF THE FAMILY OF THE PRESENT 
OWNERS. 



BY WALTER RYE 



>\N 



ILLUSTRATED. 



PRINTED BY AGAS H. GOOSE, RAMPANT HORSE STREET, NORWICH. 

1889. 



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77 



2_ Z- I r ' 



ONE OF NINETY COPIES. 



^* 






INTRODUCTION. 




[HE history of a nunnery, of which next to nothing, except 
two or three dwelling-rooms of late date remains above 
ground, and which was never of any great importance, 
is rather difficult to write, and I cannot hope to have made it 
interesting to the general reader. 

There are, however, two or three things among its records to 
which attention may be drawn. It had royal patronage, and was, 
at one time, so popular among the better classes that more nuns 
wanted to join it than it could afford to keep. The nuns did not 
confine their duties to the performance of the ordinary routine of 
a convent, but sent their priests to serve the Cross in the Norwich 
Market Place ; and one of their number was a very noted anchoress 
who lived an austere life in an anchorage built in the churchyard 
of St. Julian, which belonged to the Nunnery. 



11. -."<■- 



u 



Carroiv Abbey: Introduction, 



C arrow Abbey: Introduction. 



Ill 



This anchoress, indeed, is certainly the most noticeable person 
the Foundation ever produced, and her virtues, and the interest 
which attached to her as a seer of visions which appeared to her 
durincr a dangerous illness, caused her, and, no doubt, also her 
nunnery, to benefit greatly from the gifts of the pious. So much 
so indeed, that, if the dates in the text are correct, either the 
powers that were must, at her death, have provided a substitute of 
the same name, or her life must have been prolonged to very much 
more than an ordinary mortal's. 

The nuns were, possibly from their close proximity to the 

city, more Catholic in their way than nuns usually were. A lay 

Guild— that of the Saddlers and Spurriers— was held in their church, 

and they seem to have, from time to time, entertained, no doubt on 

reasonable terms, a number of the higher classes who preferred the 

quiet of a quasi-monastic life to the bustle of an inn. Amongst 

them, no doubt, was Skelton, the Poet Laureate, who, in his " Philip 

Sparrow" celebrated the death of the nun's pet bird. But, as a 

rule, I should say, that the lives of the inmates were singularly 

uneventful. There is a strange mixture of piety and pettiness in 

the answers and complaints set out when the Visitations of the 

Ordinar>' took place in 1492, 15 14. 1526, and 1532. 

There had been mismanagement by bad servants, and loss of 



goods thereby — the Prioress had had a favourite in whom she had 
specially confided —there was great scarceness of bread, especially 
among the younger sisters — the beer was too thin, the younger sisters 
sang too quickly — ^there was no clock; some of the sisters wore 
silk girdles and advised the others to do likewise; others did not 
wear their veils when they went abroad ; there were no doors to the 
choir, so anyone could get in and {proh pudor !) stare at the nuns. 
All these things were, we may suppose, corrected from time to 
time, and no serious breath of scandal seems to have reached any 
of the little community. 

One prioress was certainly prosecuted for giving a murderess 
sanctuary, but it would be hard to say how she could have avoided 
doing so; and another was pensioned off in a way which may 
appear suspicious, but that is all, and probably the place was never 
so prosperous as when Isabella Wygon built what now remains 
above ground of the nunnery — the two reception rooms described 
hereafter. 

It is to the fine glass windows afterwards inserted by the 
Sheltons in these rooms that the reader owes this little book, for 
the very fine pen and ink drawings of them which were preserved 
among the N orris collection (now in my library), and reproduced, 
facing p. 32, post, suggested its being printed. For the readiness with 



.^^Mifeiririfei 



IV 



Carrow Addey : Introduction, 



4 



which Mr. Colman acceded to my suggestion that he should issue 
and illustrate, at his sole cost, an account of his house, all students 
of Norfolk antiquities should be grateful to him. Every little 
monograph of a religious foundation is, I venture to think, very 
useful as a contribution to a county Monasticon. 

WALTER RYE. 




^^^> 



CONTENTS. 



Chapter I.— The History of the FoiintUition .... 

,, II.— The Priory Puildinj^s ....•• 

,, III.— The Prioresses, Cellaresses, and Nuns; and their Benefactors 
Appendix I.—Excerpta ex Cartulario de Carrow— Tanner MS. 

II. — From the Norris MSS, . . . . • 

III.— Charter Rolls ...... 

IV. — Douce Charters ...••• 

V,— Register of the Prior and Convent of Norwich . 
VI.— Pat. Roll, 26th Henry VI. .... 

Vll.—Originalia, 30th Henry VIII. .... 

VIII.— Norwich City Records ..... 

IX.— Extracts from Wills relating to Carrow . 
X.— Account of various Landed Possessions of the Priory . 
XI. — Pedigree of the Founders of Carrow 

XII.— Notes on Carrow Priory , by R. Makilwaine Phipson, F.S.A., F.R.I.B.A. 
XIII.- The Family of Colman ....•• 



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37 
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vi 
xi 
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xiii 

xxix 

xxxix 

xl 

xlviii 



I 



ILL UST RATIONS. 



Plan of the Ruins of Carrow Priory 
Inferior of the Great Parlour 
Shields of Arms (two plates) 



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The Guests' or Strangers^ Hall, now the Library 
Details of Stone Work at Carrow 



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34 


xlvi 


, xlvii 



«« 




CHAPTER I. 



E;^c ^istorn d t^e Jfoun&atioit/ 




F the history of this Benedictine nunnery (usually called Carrow Abbey, 
though only a priory), founded originally for a prioress and nine 
black nuns, but aftenvards having twelve nuns on its foundation, 
very little is known ; but what is known may be thus summarised. 

The actual date of its foundation ^ is not clear. King Stephen, by 



> The derivation of Carrow has long been disputed. If we agree to Norwich being a Scandinavian 
place-name, it is curious to notice that there is a place on the Norway Coast called Kaaro, and that there 
can be no doubt of the Danish origin of TAorfe, Vostwick, and many other places in the immediate 

neighbourhood. 

• It is hardly necessary to say that Dean Goulbum in his Bctses in the Roof of Norwich Cathedral, 
p. 144, follows Blomefield's original line of error in referring to this foundation. He talks of there being 
an ancient "hospital" (!) or nunnery which stood without the gates, to which Stephen gave certain lands 
{sic) and meadows : whereas, as evidenced above, the King gave them the land to build the nunnery on. 
He is said to have also given to it the advowsons of the Norwich Churches of St. Julian and All Saints by 
TimberhiU, and St. Catherine or St. Winwaloy. 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter I. 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter /. 



* 



charter,' gave his lands in the fields of Norwich, viz., 25 j. rent* and a meadow 
adjoining [the land charged with such rent] to God and the Church of St. Mary 
and St. John of Norwich, and the nuns serving there, and directed that such 
nuns should found their church on such land. They were to hold such lands as 
freely as the king himself did, and to have soc and sac, toll and theam, 
and infangthef.' 

Upon this two of the nuns, who were sisters," by name Seyna and Lescelina, 
are said to have begun building the Abbey in 1 146, and to have dedicated it to 
" St. Mary of Carhowe," from which it would seem this was an offshoot of a 
Norwich nunnery dedicated to St. Mary and St. John, now lost sight of. 

The land given to the nuns by Stephen is mentioned in a roll, to which 
the only reference we have is "Ex vetusto MS. Rotulo penes Joh Whiting 
generosum ah 1650," and is said to have extended "k Berystreteyates ^ per viam 
regiam usque ad medietatem et pontis et aquae de Trousbrigge prout patct 
per cartam Regis Stephani." Stephen's charter, however, as enrolled (see 
Appendix), does not give these details. 

In the Hundred Roll (temp. Edward I.) the Prioress of Carhow is said, 
thirty years before, to have withdrawn five of her tenants from the lete of 
Brambirton (Bramerton) to her lete of Carrow, but by what authority the jurors 
did not know. 



' This charter, with several of its confirmations, is printed in the Appendix from the Inspeximus of 
26th Henry VI. {Pat. Roll, 26th Henry VI., 2nd pt. m. lo). 

« The 25X. yearly alms to the nuns of Carrow occur on the Pipe Rolls, t.g.y 1st Richard I. 

• When the Testa de Nevill was compiled this land was reckoned as worth 20t. in reckoning the farm 
of the city.— Testa de Nevill, p. 294. 

• Tanner says " two of the sisters," but see the Cartulary post. He, and also subsequent writers, 
including Mr. Phipson, we think corruptly, read the name as Leftelina. For the Christian name Lecelina 
see Feet of Fines, Norfolk, Richard I., No. 90. It would seem to be the diminutive of Lecia. Dean 
Goulbum (see note) with perverse ingenuity tries a new variety, and calls her Lenelina. 

T £er Street Gates. Dugdale in his Mmasticon prints this " Beystecheyates.' 



A.D. 1290, the dispute between the prioress and nuns of Carhowe and the 
City of Norwich was settled by agreement Amabilia (de Ufiford) then prioress, 
surrendered all her right of view of frankpledge of all her tenants in Newgate, 
and all her other tenants in the city, and all her right of toll of all grain sold in 
the city on the day before, day, and day after the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin, 
for which the bailiffs were to pay yeariy, on the day of the Nativity aforesaid, 
half a coomb of the best wheat, and the city to take no toll, nor molest the 
prioress, during the time her fair held at Cdixhowt.^Blomefield, ii. 47- 

Richard II., in his first year (1377-8) gave the nuns another confirmation 
(printed in Appendix); and finally Henry VI., in his twenty-sixth year (1447) 
confirmed the whole by his inspeximus, also printed in the Appendix. 

King John, on 9th July, ist John (1199), granted* the nuns a four-day 
fair, viz., on the eve and the day of the nativity of their patron saint, and the 
two next days, with the same privileges as the monks of the priory had at their 

fair.» 

In the second year of the same king's reign the nuns endeavoured to obtain 
an enlargement of this, and gave the king a sparrow-hawk for having the words 
"cum omnibus libertatibus et liberis consuetudinibus ad liberas ferias per- 
tinentibus" substituted in their charter for the words "ad hujusmodi ferias 
pertinent," and in the next year the corresponding entry occurs on the Pipe 

Roll. 

It was not, however, till the 7th John that the nuns obtained their amended 
charter (now first printed, see Appendix), which was dated 9th June, 7th John, 
and will be found enrolled on m. 7d of the first part of the Charter Roll of 
7th John. 



' See charter printed in Dugdale. 

• Viz.. of Uking the toll of all that came through the city. This led to disputes, and eventually, in 
1289, Amabilia, the then prioress, surrendered such rights and her right of frankpledge of her tenants 
in Newgate for certain considerations. See Dugdale's Monasticon (edition 1846), iv. p. 68. 

B 2 



,1 



Carrow Abbey : Chapter /. 



In 8th Henry III. (1223), the prioress seems to have borrowed from the 
Jews, as may be seen from the Appendix, sub voce Biskele, p. xxx. 

Henry HI., in the thirteenth year of his reign, confirmed the gift of the 
land, but is silent as to the fair ; but later on, in the nineteenth year of his 
reign, gave them a general confirmation, and in the fifty-sixth year of his reign 
(no doubt when he was down here about the bad business of the burning the 
Cathedral; confirmed the fair also. 

In 1244 Walter de Sufiield was consecrated Bishop of Norwich, and 
William de Burgh, the King's Chaplain, Bishop of Llandaff, in this priory 
church. — Norris. 

Edward I., in his thirty-first year, confirmed the right of free warren in 
Wroxham and elsewhere, mentioned hereafter, sub voce Wroxham. 

In 46th Edward III. the Church was, according to Norris, much out of 

repair. 

It has been said, but on what authority we cannot discover, that the " nuns 
kept a high school of the most select kind." * It is possible that the idea may 
have arisen from a misconception of the Bull in favour of the nuns, by which 
Gregory X. in 1273 inhibited the prioress and convent (on their own petition) 
from increasing the number of their nuns, upon their pointing out that they 
were pressed by certain of the nobilit>- to receive more nuns than their revenues 
would sustain. 

In 1392 William de Eton left £\o towards covering the nuns' church at 
Carrow, and in 1452 a legacy was left by Robert Blyklyng towards making a 
dormitory. 

The cross in the Market Place at Nor^vich was served by the priests of 



> Mr. Phipson's paper, read December, 1881, before the Norfollc and Norwich Archxological Society. 
This is apparently copied from BhmefielJ and the i\W/olk Tour, where it is said that " it had been for 
many ages a school or place of education for the young ladies of the chief families of the diocese." 






I 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter I, 



Carrow Priory, and in the- chamber which was used as the chapel were the marks 
of an altar. Norris says " that the Corporation of Norwich paid them yeariy 4 
« bushels of wheat for the Tolhous, and in the 24th Henry VI., the city making 
"some doubt about the payment, the convent produced their evidences, with 
"which they were so well satisfied that [Thomas] Catworth, Esq., Mayor (or 
"Custos as he is called in the roll),^ with the consent of all the Aldermen, 
"ordered it to be paid for the future, as it was accordingly." 

It is not generally known that the Guild of the Saddlers and Spurriers of 
Norwich was held in honour of the Blessed Mary and All Saints in this 
Conventual Church. The certificate rendered to the Chancery in the reign of 
Richard H. is preserved in the Public Record Office, and has been printed by 
Toulmin Smith, on p. 42 of his English Gilds. It is a very interesting 
document, as being in Engli.sh it shows the dialect of the time ; but as it has 
been printed once in that form, I will give it here in modern language, as being 
more intelligible: — 

" To the honour of our lady Saint Mary and of All Hallows, these ordinances of (the) 
Fraternity of Saddlers and Spurriers in the city of Nor\vich were begun in the year of our Lord 
Jesus Christ's birth 1385, and perpetually shall be held before the image of our lady at the 
high altar in the church of nuns in the nunnery of Carrowe beside Norwich. Thus it is 

ordained — 

"That the brothers and sisters of this fraternity, so long as twelve persons of this guild 
live, they all have promised and vowed to the honour of God, that they shall maintain their 
ordinances underwritten up (to) their power and diligence in worship of Christ, and of His 
Mother and All Hallows, and (the) amendment of their and all Christian souls in the worship 
of the holy church. 

" First, that they shall find and maintain a light of two torches of wax of 32 lbs. burning 
every day at the elevation of Christ's sacred body at the high mass, but (at) no other mass. 



» He was correctly called Gustos (or warden), the city being then in the king's hands, and he being 
the king's warden, not mayor. 



\^ 



? 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter I, 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter I. 



" And this guild shall be held every year on the Sunday next after the Trinity, and all the 
brothers and sisters have a liver>- of suit' to know the brothers and sisters (by), and for no 

other reason. 

" And at the evening before the day, at the aldennan's assignment, all the brothers and 
sisters that are at NorAvich, or other place that may be reasonable, shall come together in (for 
the) cause of devotion, and say a bead for all the souls of the brothers and sisters' souls of this 
guild, and whoso fails of this he shall pay two pounds of wax at their own grant, but (unless) 
he may reasonably excuse himself by king's ser\ice. 

"Also on the morning of the day next ensuing -betime-all brothers and sisters shall be 
together in Christ Church (the Cathedral) to hear a mass at the altar before the relics, and 
every of them offer there. And when mass is said all the brothers and sisters shall go with the 
alderman, in devotion, to the place where the light is ordained, and go with a light in procession 
to the nunnery of Carrow, and there hear a mass and offer a halfpenny. 

" Also if any brother or sister die in the city of Norwich, all the brothers and sisters shall 
be at his * dirige ' with two torches of wax, and two poor men clad. 

" And also in this manner be at his mass and his entering (interring or burying), and give 
a halfpenny to alms for his soul and for all Christian (souls). 

"And if he die three miles out of Norwich all the brothers shall come to his entering, with 
their two torches and two poor men clad, and offer and do as for a brother (who dies in 

Norwich ?). 

"And if he die without the 'lists' of three miles, and his mansion and his household are 
in the city, he 'shall do done' (»./., shall have done for him ?) a dirige and mass with their 
lights, and alms be done. 

"And if any brother or sister that dwells without the lists of three miles from the city 
shall die, all the brothers and sisters shall cause to be said for his soul in the church of the 
nunnery of Carrow dirige and mass, and (to be) done for his soul as for any brother or sister 
aforesaid." 

In 2nd Henry V. the nuns had a litigation with the Prior and Convent of 
NorAvich, about the Court Lete in Carrow and Trowse : the Prioress herself had 
to go twice to London about it, the litigation costing over £\QO {Norris, p. i64> 



' This is a much better expression than our present " suit of livery." 



!' 



In 2ist Henry VI. (1442-3) the management of the Abbey and the 
administration of its affairs were committed by the Bishop of Norwich 
to Thomas VVetherby, Esq., in whose care they remained till March, 1445. 

Norris conjectures that the then Prioress, Lady Alice Waryn, was guilty of 
some "male {sic!) administration," on account of which the Bishop removed 
her. She went to Bungay, and the Convent allowed her 3 3 J. ^d. per annum. 

From 1426 to 1478 constant references occur in the wills noted in the 
Appendix to one Julian Lampet, the anchoress or recluse of Carrow, who had 
her anchorage in the churchyard of St. Julian, which church belonged to 
Carrow Priory. Her surname came into the county by the marriage of Alice de 
Brockdish to William de Lampet. about 1355 (^^- ^^rf., v. p. 336). Her 
Christian name may have been her name in religion, and adopted from her 
anchorage. A George Lampet and his son John were guests in the Priory in 
145 1-2, and were probably akin to her, as were, no doubt. Dame Margaret 
Lampitt of Ridlingficld and James Lampitt, Gent, both legatees in the will 
of Peter la Belle, a benefactor to Carrow, whose will is dated 1466 (Register 
Jekkys, fo. 106 b.) She had two servants, one named Margaret. About 1445 
the "Anchoress of Carrow," and the "Anchoress at St. Julian's," were 
mentioned in the same will, so probably she had returned to the Priory 
and left a younger substitute. She probably died between 1478 and 1483; 
see Appendix, p. xix. Her visions, which, he says, were vouchsafed to her in 
1373 (when aged thirty years and a half), have been thrice printed, once in 
1670 and twice in 1843- There is, probably, a transcriber's error in this date 
of 1373, which would make her born about 1342, and we know she was alive 
in 1478, which would make her then one hundred and thirty-six years old. Yet 
it is hard to see how this can be, for the words of the MS. (p. 4 of the 1843 
edition), are cleariy "a thousand three hundredth Ixxiij." Now, if for the 
argument's sake, we take the figures to be a misreading of the latest possible 
date in the fourteenth century, viz., I399, this will still give us a birth-date 
of 1367, and we know she was living in 1478. Can it be there were two 






8 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter I. 



Car row Abbey: Chapter I. 



consecutive Julians as anchoresses, and that the monastery found the fame 
of the first so profitable that they provided a second? Blomefidd (iv. p. 81) 
has this about her: — 

« In the east part of this churchyard stood an anchorage, in which an ankeress or recluse 
dwelt till the Dissolution, when the house was demolished, though the foundations may still be 
seen. In 1393, Lady Julian, the ankeress here, was a strict recluse, and had two servants to 
attend her in her old age, A" 1443- This woman. In those days, was esteemed one of the 
greatest holiness. The Rev. Mr. Francis Peck, author of The Antiquities of Stanford, had 
an old vellum MS., 36 quarto pages of which contained an account of the visions, &c., of 
this woman, which begins thus : ' Here es a Vision* schewed be the Goodenes of God, to a 
•devoute Woman, and hir Name is Julian that is Recluse atte Norwyche, and yitt ys on Life. 
'Anno Domini M.CCCC.XLII. In the whilke Vision cr fulle many comfortabyll Wordes & 
♦greatly styrrandc to alle they that desyres to be Crj-stes Looverse. In 1472, Dame Agnes 
'was recluse here; in 1481, Dame Elizabeth Scott; in 1510. Lady Elizabeth ; in 1524, Dame 
•Agnes Edrygge."' 

In 1466 we get a glimpse of the prioress and her following attending the 
funeral of John Taston. Payments were made "to the Prioress of Carrow 
6j. 8r/.. to a maid that came with her \s. S«/., to the anchoress 3^. 4^." 

The next glimpse of the internal life of the monastery is that we get from 
the Episcopal Visitations of 1492, ISU. 1526, and 1532. 
1492. "The general visitation of the Ordinary, conducted personally by the Right 

Reverend Father in Christ, James, by the grace of God and the Apostolic See, 
Bishop of Norwich, in the priory of the church of the regular or convent house 
of the nuns of Carrow, in his own diocese of Nor\vich, follows in this manner :— 
« In the name of our Lord. Amen. On Wednesday, the loth of October, 
in the year of our Lord 1492, and in the 2 1st year of his office, the reverend 
father coming in person to the priory to perform his visitation, was received by 



* A MS. of this is No. 8297 of the Bibliotht'qiu Imperial. 



\ 
I 



the prioress and her nuns with a solemn procession outside the west gate. 
Thence, when the rcsponsory ' Summae Trinitati ' was begun by the cantor, with 
the banner of the Holy Cross raised on high, the bells also ringing, he came to 
the high altar, and when he had prayed to Immortal God, and had bestowed 
his solemn blessing on those present, he at once entered the chapter house, 
along with the prioress and nuns, and with those right eloquent men. Masters 
Nicholas Goldwclle. Archdeacon of NorNvich, Thomas Wotton, Bachelor of 
Laws, taking with them on this behalf me, John Aphowell, notary public by 
imperial and apostolical authority, and scrivener. 

" When the word of God had been preached in the midst, that religious 
woman. Dame Catharine Segrymc, the prioress, herself appeared immediately, 
and handed in letters of certification, sealed with the convent seal, of and 
concerning the execution of the orders of the reverend father in that behalf, 
and she exhibited the charters, but she rendered no account ; an oath of 
canonical obedience to the reverend father having been taken by her in her 
own name and in that of all her sisters. Then the reverend father examined 
secretly and singly all and singular the said prioress and her sisters, of and 
concerning the state of that house. What was found by that examination is 

as follows : — 

" In the first place it was found that the younger nuns were restricted to 
eight loavcs-a quantity far too little for ten sisters for a whole day ; and it was 
ordained that the prioress should receive, as servants, women of good fame and 
honesty, and that an inventory of the priory goods should be made so that one 
part should remain with the prioress, the other with the sisters. Also it was 
found that ill-disposed servants of the prioress caused great loss of goods of the 

prior>'. 

"Next that the prioress confides more and has greater faith in a certain 
Margaret Knight, now absent, than in the other sisters of the house, who,=> 



» Dr. Jessopp has printed quia instead of qua. 



i 



i 



lO 



Carroiu Abbey: Chapter I. 



whilst she was in the house, did much harm to it, and therefore it is for the 
good of the house that she be not recalled. 

"Also that the prioress lends too ready an ear to some of the sisters, and 
that thus great discord arises among them. 

" Next, that there is very often scarceness of bread, contrary to the honour 

of the house. 

•' Names of the prioress and nuns : — 

Dame Catharine Scgryme, the prioress. 

Dame Cecilia Ryall, the sub-prioress. 

Dame Margaret Folkard 

Dame Anna Martyn 

Dame Johanna Grcne 

Dame ^laria Whyght 

Dame Agnes Sherman 

Dame ^largery Carhowe 

Dame Margery Wellys 

Dame Margaret Clarke 

Dame Margaret Steward 

Dame Margery Wodehows 

Dame Catherine Jerveys 



, Professed. 



Not professed. 



« And then the said Reverend Father dissolved for that time in peace the 
above visitation, reserving to himself the power of making injunctions, and of 
compelling the said prioress and her nuns to observe the same." 

1 5 14. "On the 25th day of the month of August, in the year of our Lord 

one thousand five hundred and fourteen, the reverend father in Christ. &c.. 






1 



I 



Carrow Abbey : Chapter I. ^ 

personally visited the house or priory of the nuns of Bungay.' And he 
was reverently received there with a procession, and afterwards entenng the 
chapter house, he caused the prioress and sisters to be summoned, to whom, 
after the word of God had been preached, he caused articles to be shown on 
which they were to be examined. And he questioned them as follows :- 

Dame Isabella Wigan, the prioress, says That all is well. 

Dame Ann Martin, the sub-prioress, says That Dame Margaret K.dman 

is unkind. 

That the rations distributed are 
Dame Johanna Green says mat uic 

more scanty than is usual. 

Dame ^largaret Carrow says .... AH is well. 

^ ,, ^4. r'orb . . . Agrees with her. 
Dame Margaret Cierk ^ 

Dame Agnes Warner Agrees. 

Dame Katherine ^S^ees. 

Dame Margaret Stcwardc Agrees. 

Dame Ann London Agrees. 

Dame Margaret Kidman Agrees. 

« And this done, the Bishop closed his visitation as ordinary there." 

"June 14th 1526. Dame Isabell Wigan, the prioress, denies that the house 1526. 
is in debt, and' in respect to the other matters she declares them to be well 

observed. , . i.1, r 

.. Dame Ann Marten, the sub-prioress, says that she knows nothmg worthy of 



« By an error 



of the scribe Bungay is put for Carrow; but the names of the prioress and nuns 



identify the place as being Carrow beyond a doubt 



C 2 



\ 



12 



Car row Abbey: Chapter I. 



reformation, but she says that the sisters say and sing quicker than they ought, 

and without due pause. 

"Besides this, she complains of the thinness of the liquor. 

"Dame Margaret Steward, a nun of twenty-eight years standing, on being 
questioned, declares that the pauses in the chanting and reading are badly 
observed, and that no punishment is inflicted for breaking silence. 

"Dame Catherine Jerves, precentress and fourth prioress, professed for 
thirty-eight years, says, on examination, that the liquor is thin, and for the 

rest all is well. 

"Dame Agnes Warner, on examination says that the pause is not observed 

in singing and saying the hours, but that they sing too quickly. 

"Dame Agnes S wanton, the sacrist, who has been a nun twenty-one years, 

says that they do not possess a clock. 

"Dame Ann London, the refectoraria, says that all things, both spiritual and 

temporal, are in good state. 

"Dame Johanna Botulph says that they do not celebrate the Feasts of the 
Name of Jesus, or of St. Edward, and take no notice of them ; besides, that on 
Christmas Day they make the youngest nun pretend to be Lady Abbess,^ and 
on this occasion she is obliged to consume and waste all she has obtained by 
alms or the gifts of her friends. Likewise that the obedientiaries of the house 
are obliged to renew the cloths and vessels which relate to their office, and no 
funds are assigned for that purpose by the prioress. 

"Dame Cecilia Suffeld declares she knows nothing demanding correction or 

reforming. 

"Injunctions:— In the first place the prioress is ordered to get and keep 
in order a clock before next Michaelmas. 






Car row Abbey: Chapter I. 



13 



"Also that a laundress be got and provided, who shall be more equal 

to her work, and can do her duty. 

"That Divine Scrxice be celebrated with greater devotion, and with due 

pause both in singing and saying. 

"Next that the expenses of making good the cloths and vessels belongmg to 
the offices (of the obedientiaries) should be defrayed, when needful, by the 

^"°'"Ilso that for the future the assuming of the character of abbess be dis- 

continued. r - a 

" Next that silence be duly obser^•ed for the future under pain of an mcreased 

^'"'"Next that the Feasts of the Name of Jesus and of St. Edward be observed, 
even as they are in other parts of the diocese." 



"lothjune, 1532:— 



1 1 do not know if this curious paraUd to the well-known Boy Bishop has ever been noticed. 



Dame Isabel Wigan, prioress. 

Dame Ann Marten, in charge of the infirmary. 

Dame Margaret Steward, the sub-prioress. 

Dame Katherine Jerves. 

Dame Agnes Warner, in charge of the infirmary. 

Dame Agnes Swanten, sacrist 

Dame Ann London, in charge of the refectory. 

Dame Johanna Botolf 

Dame Cicely Suthfeld. 

Dame Matilda Graby. 

Dame Johanna Bound \ 

Dame Agnes Hammond | Not professed. 

Dame Christian Browne / 



..Dame Isabel Wigan, the prioress, questioned and examined about the state 
of the house and the essentials of religion, and also concerning the observance 



1532. 



) 



14 



Cirroiv Abbey: ChapUr I. 



of the Rule of the Order, and concerning the administration of the spiritualities 
and temporalities of the said priory, says that everything is duly done and 
observed according to the powers and means of the house. 

"Dame ISIargaret Steward, sub-prioress, says that some of the sisters use 
girdles or belts of silk, and advise others to do the same. She says that it was 
an old custom of the house for the younger nuns, who held no office, each day 
after mid-day to sit together in a chamber set apart for that purpose, under the 
superintendence of one of the seniors, and now they disperse to separate 

apartments. 

"Item that the sub-prioress be ordered that only once in the week shall she 
call any of the nuns outside the choir away from compline, and that the sub- 
prioress be forbidden to allow any sister to absent herself from the choir at the 
hour of compline more than once a week. 

"Dame Catharine Jer^•is, the third prioress, says that the choir has no doors, 
and with this excuse many can and do have access to the nuns in the choir. 

"Dame Agnes Swanton, the sacrist, sajs that all entries are duly 

obser\'cd. 

"Dame Ann London complains about the choir being open, and that con- 
sequently lay people can stare at the nuns daily ; for the rest she says all is 

well. 

"Dame Johanna Botolf says that the Feast of Relics is not observed among 

them on a Sunday, as is the case in other places, but it simply takes place on 
the evening of the Octaves of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin ; also that the 
nuns do n"ot put on their veils when they go out ; also that the nuns have no 
annual pension ; also that laymen have access to and sight of the choir, through 
the absence of gates or doors ; also that the priest who officiates at evening 
service is scarcely audible by the sisters in the choir, from the want of a lectern 
on which to place the priest's book. 

"Dame Cecilia Suthefeld says that the nuns receive no pension from the 
resources of the house, and that otherwise all is well. 



Car row Abbey : Chapter I. 



"Dame Matilda Gravell {sic) says that the nuns, according to the rule, were 
wont to have one of their number in the refectory waiting upon the rest at 
table and that they do not now, otherwise all is well. 

"Also she says that in the same priory the Octaves of St. Benedict are not 

celebrated. 

"INJUNCTIONS -.-That the younger nuns who have no offices are to sit 
together in the afternoon, in the same room assigned for this purpose by the 
prioress, according to the custom of former times. 

"That the sub-prioress neither allow to be away, nor call away, any of the 
nuns from the choir at compline, except once only a week. 

"That before the Feast of St. Peter ad vincula. a door be made, lest 
laymen should have access to the western entrance of the choir. 

"That the Feast of Relics be for the future observed as in other places, that 
is to say on the Sunday next after the Feast of the Translation of St. Thomas, 
and that a double feast be celebrated. 

"That according to ancient custom the prioress shall appoint one of the 
nuns to serve the rest at table in the refectory." 



The scene of the pathetic poem of Plnlip Sparrow is said to have been 
laid at Carrow Abbey by Skelton.« the poet laureate, who died 1529. How 
"Gib our cat" slew the pet sparrow is told in verses not devoid of fancy. 
which begin thus :— 



. Can it be that John Skelton was of the family of the Sheltons who soon after had a grant of the 
place? T^.Norfolk 71.. boldly says he was the son of ^VilUam Skelton and Margaret his wife, whose 

wUI was proved at Norwich, 7th November, 1512. 



hi 



^ 



\\\ 



I 



".v^^..- 



-•- M 



i6 



Car row Abbey : Chapter I. 



"A Little Boke of Philip Sparow. 



" Pla ce bo 

Who is there who 
Di le xi • 

Dame Margery 

Fa re my my 

Wherefore and why why 

For the soule of Philip Sparow 
That was late slaine at Carow. 



"Among tHe nunnes blake 
For that sweet soule's sake 
And for al Sparowes' soules 
Set on our bead roules 

Pater noster qui 

With an Ave Maria 

And with the comer of a creed 

The more shalbe your meed." 



When the " Norfolk Chantry Certificates " were taken, the Commissioners 
reported very well of the abbey. The eight nuns were persons " of very good 
name by report of the country," and the house was " in very good and necessary 
reparation." Besides the nuns there were two priests, seven "hinds" for 
husbandry, and eight women-servants. The value of the lead, bells, and 
buildings was estimated at £i^^. 

On the dissolution the site was given in 1539 to Sir John Shelton,' by a grant, 
printed in Appendix VII. Sir John's wife was aunt to Anne Boleyn, who was 
beheaded three years before. Was this gift intended to appease her family ? 
Litigation seems to have at once commenced between Sir John and the city as to 
the jurisdiction which the city claimed within the Priory of Carrow and Trowse 
Millgate as parcel of the county of the city. This Shelton denied, affirming 
them to be within the county of Norfolk. Complaints were also made that one 
of the farmers of the late priory had ploughed up and encroached on a common 
way called " Grenegateway," near the walls of the city ; but whether the former 
dispute was arranged we do not know. Documents relating to these differences 
will be found in Appendix VIII. 



* One of the name, Margaret Shelton, had been received as a guest in 31st Henry VI. (1452-3.) 



Ill 



Carrow Abbty : Chapter I. 



17 



In 1544 Mary, the widowed Duchess of Richmond and daughter of the 
second Duke of Norfolk, must have been staying here, for the city sent her a 
present of a gallon of fine hippocras worth 6s. Zd, 

The revenues of this house being under ;C200 per annum, it fell by the 
first statute in the 27th Henry VIII., A.D. 1536, at which time it was valued at 
;C64. 6s. 6\d. {Dugdale) ; and £%\. \2s. \%d. {Speed). From this time it continued 
in the Crown till the year 1544, when it was granted* by King Henry VIII., with 
all the revenues, rights, and privileges thereunto belonging to John Shelton of 
Shelton in Norfolk, Esq., it being then worth £^0. i^s. ^d. 

The estate is said to have passed by the marriage of Anne, daughter of 
Thomas Barrow, Esq., of Suffolk, and widow of Sir Ralph Shelton, to Charles 
Cornwallis. I cannot trace this, but it seems to have been bought by her relations, 
for in 13th Elizabeth, Sir William Butts, Knt, Nicholas Bacon, Esq., Thomas 
Barrowe, Esq., and William Barrowe, Gent., acquired this manor for themselves 
and the heirs of William Barrowe, which acquisition was pardoned them in the 
29th Elizabeth {Feet of Fines, divers counties. Trinity, 13th Elizabeth, and 
Entry Book of Licenses and Pardons, 29th Elizabeth, fo. 134 d.) 

The manor of Carrow was the subject of a fine, Michaelmas, 9th Charles I. 
(1633) between the Rev. Edmund Dye and the Rev. Sampson Hopes ^ and 
Margaret his wife, who must have been the heiress of a former owner, and who 
with her husband sold it to Dye for £i2Q? Sir Humfrey May had owned it in 






1 See recital in Licenses and Pardons,— Alienation Office Lib. I, fol. 250.— Inq. 24-26 Eliz. 

> Sampson Hopes was Vicar of East Winch : presented 1592. 

» Feet of Fhus, Norfolk, 9th Charles L, Michaelmas.— Fine levied at Westm., on the morrow of St. 
Martin, 9th Charles L (1634) between the Rev. Edmund Dye, quer., and the Rev. Sampson Hopes and 
Margaret his wife, def., of the manor of Carowe alias Carrowe, with appurts. and of one messuage, four 
cottages, two bams, twenty-six acres of land, ten acres of meadow, ten pasture, thirty shillings rent, and 
lil)crty of foldage, with appurts. in Eastwinche, Gayton, and Middleton, together with the rectory and 
advowson of the vicarage church of Eastwinche, with all tithes of com, grain, and hay belonging to the 



<. 



ty 



i8 



Carrow Abbey : Chapter I. 



1624. He was a Royalist, (see Royalist Comp. Papers, ix., p. 275, and 
Register of Burials at Westminster), and after him his widow, Judith May, 
who presented to St. Julian in 1634. 

By fine, Easter, 1682 (divers counties), Robert Axtcll, Gent., bought the 
manor and other property of James May, Esq., of Carrow, for £ 1 100.* 

Nathaniel Axtell must have been owner in 1685— 1704, for he presented to 
St. Julian on these dates as Lord of Carrow. In 1722 Robert Axtell sold to 
John Walthoe and wife (a bookseller in Fleet Street), who is said to have kept 
it but a short time, and reconveyed it to the Axtells. By fine, Trin., 8th 
George I., John Walthoe and Mary his wife conveyed {i.a.) the manor to 
Nathaniel Axtell, Esq., for;^i200.5 



said rectory. The said Sampson and Margaret quit claim and warrant the premises to the said Edmund 
and his heirs against themselves and the heirs of the said Margaret for ever. Consideration, £i20 
sterling. 

* Fines, divers counties, 34th Charles II., Easter, 1682.— [Note of] Fine between Nathaniel Axtell, 
Gent., quer., and James May, Armiger, def., of the manor of Carrowe, with appurts., and of eight 
messuages, eight gardens, eight orchards, fifty acres of land, sixty meadow, one hundred pasture, and locw. 
rent, with appurts. in Carrowe, Troughes, and the parishes of St. John and St. Stephen; also the advowson 
of the churches of St. Edward, St. Julian, All Saints, and the chapel of St. Katherine in Norwich, in the 
county of Norwich, with all manner of tithes belonging to the same. And of the manor of Carrowe with 
appurts. and of twelve messuages, twelve gardens, twelve orchards, one hundred and twenty acres of 
land, seventy-five meadow, three hundred pasture, sixteen wood, and 100 shillings and twenty 
measures of fine wheat rent, with appurts. in Carrowe, Troughes, Lakenham, Surlingham, Brakendell, 
Ameringhall, Rockland, Helston, Porland, Kirby, Biskley, Bramerton, Bemham, Rednall, Thurleton, 
Wreningham, Birkham, Skerinnge, Stowbardolfe, Haylesdon, Melton, Thetford, Eastwinche, Swardestone, 
Halvergate, Shelton, and Hardwicke; also of the advowson of the churches of Stowbardolfe and 
Surlingham, in the county of Norfolk. The said James quits claim and warrants the premises against 
himself and his heirs to the said Nathaniel and his heirs for ever. Consideration, £l 100 sterling. 

» Fine, divers counties, 8th George I., Trinity. Fine levied at Westm., on the morrow of the 
Ascension, 8th George I., 1722. Between Nathaniel Axtell, Armiger, quer., and John Walthoe, senior, 
and Maria his wife, of the manor of Carrowe, with appurts., and of eight messuages, eight gardens. 



'/ 



Carroiv Abbey : Chapter I. 




19 



In 1 7 14 Samuel Thacker, brewer, lived here and voted. Nathaniel (?) Axtell 
left it to his relation, Susannah Sterman, who married Robert Moreton, a 
Barrister-at-law, who in 1746 was life tenant Her heiress, probably daughter 
Mary, married George Stuart, and they together conveyed it and other property 
by fine to Edward Stanley, Esq., for £l6o.^ The next owner was John 
Drinkwater, and from him the estate passed into the hands of John Ridges, who 
sold it in 1807 to Sir Roger Kerrison, Knt. In 181 1 the Abbey and grounds 
were purchased by Philip M. Martineau, Esq., and remained in the Martineau 
family until 1878, when the building, lands, and manor of Carrow were purchased 
by Messrs. J. & J. Colman, the present owners. 

Among the Exchequer Depositions by commission, 21st Charles I., there 



^1 

• ft I 



• ^ 



\ 



IS 

•4 



eight orchards, fifty acres of land, sixty meadow, one hundred pasture, and \<X)s. rent, with appurts. in 
Carrowe, Trowse, and the parishes of St. John and St. Stephen, and of the advowson of the churches 
of St. Edward, St. Julian, All Saints, and the chapel of St. Katherine, in Norwich, county Nor\vich, 
with all manner of tithes belonging to the same. And of the manor of Carrowe, twelve messuages, 
twelve gardens, twelve orchards, one hundred and twenty acres of land, seventy-five meadow, three hundred 
pasture, sixteen wood, and the rent of iooj., and twenty bushels of fine wheat, in Carrowe, Trowse, 
Lakenham, etc., in county Norfolk. The said John and Maria quit-claim and warrant the premises against 
themselves, and the heirs of the said Maria, to the said Nathaniel and his heirs for ever. Consideration, 
£1200 sterling. 

• Fines, Norfolk, 20th George II., Michaelmas. Fine levied at Westm., Michaelmas, in three weeks, 
20 George II., 1746. Between Edward Stanley, Esq., quer., and George Stuart and Mary his wife, def., of 
the manor of Carrowe, and twelve messuages, twelve gardens, twelve orchards, one hundred and twenty 
acres of land, seventy- five meadow, three hundred pasture, sixteen wood, and the rent of iooj., and twenty 
bushels of wheat, in Carrowe, Trowse, Lakenham, Brackend, Ameringhall, Rockland, Helston, 
Porland, Kirkby, Biskley, Bramerton, Bemham, Rednall, Thurleton, Wreningham, Berkham, Skeringe, 
Stowbardolfe, Haylesden, Melton, Thetford, East Winche, Swardeston, Havei^te, Shelton, and 
Hardwicke. The said George and Mary grant for themselves, and the heirs of the said Mary, the 
premises aforesaid (after the death of a certain Robert Moreton, Esq., who then held them for term of 
his life), to the said Edward, to be held by him and bis heirs of the chief lord of the fee, at the usual 
services for ever. Warranted against the heirs of the said Mary. Consideration, £160 sterling. 

D 2 



20 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter /. 



arc some of great interest. In a suit (which practically revived one supposed 
to have been settled in 1290, see ante) between Dame Judith May, widow, and 
William Tooke and others, v. the Mayor of the City of Norwich, Adrian 
Parmiter, Henry Crew, and others, sheriffs, citizens, and commonalty, relating to 
Carrow Hills and Carrow Pits, and the dispute about the city "recreation 
ground," John Tooke deposed that he had divers years past seen the foundation 
of a house of stone which might have been either the kiln house or stable, and 
referred to a piece of hilly ground adjoining, lying between it and the house, 
called Brakendale. Robert Bunne deposed that the owners of Carrow Abbey 
have always been reputed owners of Carrow Pits. William Tooke's evidence is 
amusing. He says that when his father or he drove out defendant's, Crewe's, 
horses " he hath used both of them in very rude and uncivil manner, and used 
many thretninge words to them, both threatning to make an end of them or 
that he would be their death, and words to that effecte ; and once when this 
deponent did offer to drive the said Crewe's horses from thence the said Crew 
did in a ver>' outragious manner assault this deponent with a knife, and did 
threaten to cutt his throate, and did with the said knife cutt the deponent's band 
about his neck, and did with a great slash [cut] through this deponent's coat and 
dublett." Another witness (Thomas Smith) said that one Barcham "did bid 
Crew runne his knife in the said Tooke's gutts, &c." The evidence for the 
defence was that the ground in dispute was a place of recreation for " Runinge," 

shootinge, bowlinge, and the like for the citizens and inhabitants," and 

that they always called it Conisforth Pits and Carrow Pits. 

The Chartulary has long been lost, and has escaped careful search, but 
I succeeded in finding some considerable extracts from it in the Tanner MSS. at 






Carrow Abbey : Chapter I. 



21 



the Bodleian Library (Tanner MS. 342, fo. 149), which cites " Ex libro monachii 
Monialium de Carho in manibus Jo. Corbet, Bart.]' and again (151, fo. 4) from 
charters (qy. a chartulary) of Carhow, penes Nath. Axtell, arm., who was, it will 
be remembered, then the freeholder. 

Some of the ACCOUNTS of the prioresses were in existence when Kirkpatrick 
wrote his History of the Religious Orders of Norwich (see p. 296), in which he 
quotes a payment of 4^., in the 25th Edward I., for writing and sealing divers 
writs in the castle. 

The seals are fully described and illustrated in Blomefield ; but it is as well 
to note that an impression of one of them, ascribed to the thirteenth century, is 
in the British Museum. See Catalogue of the British Museum Seals, 1837, 

p. 51. 

A draught of the common seal of this house, taken from a draught lately 
in the possession of Peter Le Neve, Esq., Norroy King at Arms, is in the Norris 
collection, but it and that at the British Museum are not clear enough for 

engraving. 

It may be as well to print here the following note made by Norris :— 

•' This convent had also a spirittial jurisdiction which extended over Carhowe and part of 

" Trowse and Briskelee. 

" Their chaplain was judge of the court, in which they punished all sorts of spiritual crimes 
'• and offences cofifra bonos mores, and also proved wills. I have seen a book of the acts of 
♦* this court beginning in the year 1213." 




' It is very singular that the Athletic and Cricket Grounds, better known as the " Lakenham 
Grounds," should so closely represent the old site. The active connection of the Colman family with 
cricket, and the " eleven" of the brothers Colman of 1845-6, are mentioned in Appendix XIII. 



■ ^./".•ij^ 



i 



— Plan «f ^, Ruims .> Cawwow Pwiory. - NoRwigg. — 



H I 



01 OmgiWAL VteK* . 

--; SUCCCSTED RtSTORATIONS 



I 







- - -- ^Kitm mutt-tmnmm 

9.CATM 

; q D D G a OpO • <* • 



NoavM 



Ai*kt 



9.C«tMUIW<t CMVCk 




— N 



—So o » •• 



<>«>0< 




£ 



3 {rffe?g='^=i«H« 



*t» k I — 



rsn -ii ■ TT—n 



• — Ci-OltTtW C*"*" — 



|l2j gr BICICSSJ IB ■■ C£SSS2(S» 




i-. 



fiiiif r r T T r 



Note.— This plan is a reproduction of that used by Mr. Phipson, which differs very slighUy only from 
thAt inserted by me in the Norfolk Antiquarian AlUcellany, vol. ii. p. 465.— W.R. 







CHAPTER II. 



©Ijje Ipriorg ^uilbiitgs. 



( 



HOSE who prefer a skilled architect's description of the existing — and 
theories on the non-existing — buildings, are referred to the Appendix 
at pp. xl.-xlv., in which I reprint Mr. Phipson's " Notes on Carrow 
Priory," which appeared in the ninth volume of The Norfolk and Norwich 
ArcJuBological Society's Transactions. 

The following is as the place seemed to Mr. E. A. Tillett and myself, 
when we wrote our account of it in vol. ii. of The Norfolk Antiquarian 

Miscellany. 

• •••••• 

"There are still the parlour of the prioress, a chamber over it, and the 
strangers' hall with a projecting rectangular bay. The foundations may be 
traced of the church, sacristy, chapter-house, and day-room, and the site of the 
cloister walls can be identified : other foundations of buildings in various parts 
of the priory grounds are to be found ; but it is difficult to speak with any 
degree of certainty as to the use to which the buildings were appropriated. 



I 



I 



24 



Car row Abbey : Chapter II. 



"The boundary walls are to a great extent standing, and the course of them 
can easily be traced on the south, east, and west sides. It is curious to observe 
that on the north side some portions of the wall are 2 or 3 ft. in the 
channel of the river, thus shewing that the VVensum has deviated in its course 
southward since the wall was built. 

"In describing the various portions of the remains,' which are scanty as to 
detail, we consider it best to commence with the indications of the earliest 
work, which take us to the Norman period. The chancel, exterior and interior, 
shews nothing but Norman workmanship. The east wall externally is divided 
by piers into three bays, each pier having columns at the angles and faced with 
stone in courses averaging 6 ins. deep, the bays being faced with flint ; 
and the plinth, which is a foot below the level of the floor of the chancel, can be 
traced round the greater portion of the original building. As the remains of 
this wall are not more than 2 ft. out of the ground, very little of the 
architectural features can be observed. The interior of this wall shows a plinth 
directly on the floor level, with the projections for the same division into bays. 
The chancel was approached by steps from the choir. Of this (the choir) little 
can be seen ; but it appears to have been in four bays, two of which were open 
on the north side into St. Catherine's Chapel, and on the south side into that of 
St. John the Baptist. On the south side, in the second bay from the chancel, is 
a brick vault lined with plaster, and taking up half the thickness of the wall 
from the interior. The bricks on the exterior side being on edge led to the 
supposition that they might form the division between two vaults ; but having 
endeavoured to pierce through the wall, the other side did not appear to be 



' Much of the building must have been pulled down and carted away. The beautiful porch at 
Arminghall Hall is said to have come hence. See Cotman, i. p. 34. 

Norris says there was a tower, with a pinnacle of stone on the top of it, but that the monastery was 
only covered \vith reed, " as appears by several rolls mentioning repairs done to it." 



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24 



Grr.'vii' Abbey : Chapter II. 



"The boundary \valls arc to a great extent standing, and the course of them 
can easily be traced on the south, cast, and west sides. It is curious to observe 
that on the north side some portions of the wall are 2 or 3 ft. in the 
channel of the river, thus shewing that the Wensum has deviated in its course 
southward since the wall was built. 

•' In describing the various portions of the remains," which are scanty as to 
detail, we consider it best to commence wttli the indications of the earliest 
work, which take us to the Xorman period. The chancel, exterior and interior, 
shews nothing but Xorman workmanship. The east wall externally is divided 
by piers into three bays, each pier having columns at the angles and faced with 
stone in courses averaging C ins. deep, the bays being faced with flint ; 
and the plinth, which is a foot below the level of the floor of the chancel, can be 
traced round the greater portion of the original building. As the remains of 
this wall are not more than 2 ft. out of the ground, very little of the 
architectural features can be obscr\'ed. The interior of this wall shows a plinth 
directly on the floor level, with the projections for the same division into bays. 
The chancel was approached by steps from the choir. Of this (the choir) little 
can be seen; but it appears to have beer in four bays, two of which were open 
on the north side into St. Catherine's Chapel, and on the south side into that of 
St. John the Baptist. On the south side, in the second ba}- from the chancel, is 
a brick vault lined with plaster, and taking up half the thickness of the wall 
from the interior. The bricks on the exterior side being on edge led to the 
supposition that they might form ihc division between two vaults ; but having 
endeavoured to pierce through the wall, the other side did not appear to be 



^ Much of the building must have been pulled down and carted away. The beautiful porch at 
Arminghall IL1II is said to h.-ive come hence. See Cotman, i. p. 34. 

Norris says there was a tower, with a pinnacle of stone on the top of it, but that the monastery was 
only covered with reed, " as appears by several rolls menlioninij repairs done to it." 







fr 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter II. 



25 



hollow. At the time of the excavations, which were made by Mr. Colman, M.P., 
about two years ago, so far as we have been able to learn, the vault was 
unoccupied. There were four massive-looking piers, about 5 ft. in diameter: 
the base of one still remains. These evidently supported a tower, and were 
cased with stone in blocks of an average thickness of 7 ins., the core being 

of rubble. 

"On the south side of the choir and chancel is St. John the Baptist's 
Chapel,^ which is decidedly part of the work of the Norman foundation : this 
may have been originally an aisle of the eariy church, as we find the floor level 
of the altar in this chapel was 7 ins. above the plinth line, and obscured 
Norman bases of columns for arcading, and this altar and the floor level must 
therefore be of a later period. In the remains of the wall forming the base of 
the altar is a piece of Norman billet cable moulding. 

•• Passing to the north side of the choir and chancel we come to the site of 
St. Catherine's Chapel.^ But little can be traced here. There remain indications 
of a wall at double the distance from the choir than from the exterior wall of St 
John's Chapel. In this wall are formed two cylindrical tanks, evidently placed 
there for the stowage of water, being respectively from 10 to 12 ft. deep. 
The remains of walls at the east end of this chapel suggest that it may have 
been afterwards devoted to secular purposes. There doubtless was a north 
transept ; but we have been unable to trace its foundations. 



• In which John Dowes requested to be buried in 1439- The chapel of St. John the Evangelist was 

on the south side in 1438. 

* The altar of St. Catherine is specially mentioned in the undated gift of some land in Norwich by 
Robert son of John de Stamford, to find a lamp burning before it for ever. 

The image of our Lady of Pity is mentioned in the will of William Aslak in 1531. (Regr. Alpe, 195.) 
In 1530 Elizabeth Yaxley left " a clothe of tappestry worke, scored w* the Nativite, Resureccon, and 
Epiphany, to hange in theyr Church at solempne feestes, to remember myn husbandes soule and myn." 
She also gave to the prioress " a gylte spone and my clothe of the iij Kynges of Coleyn." 

E 2 



26 



Carroiv Abbey: Chapter II. 



" The south transept is undoubtedly a part of the original fabric, the west 
wall shewing the Norman plinth, on which plinth sprang arcading. The south 
wall of this transept has insertions of Early English work, which is also seen 
in the change in the moulding of the plinth and in the base of a column at the 
south-east angle (interior), and also in a similar base at the same angle on the 
exterior. 

"The sacristy is wholly Early English, and at the time of its erection 
considerable alterations appear to have taken place, Early English work being 
substituted where it must have previously been Norman. The colouring of the 
walls (dark red and blue) of the sacristy was clearly distinguishable when the 
excavations were first made. There is a comparatively modern brick wall, in 
which are two doorways, inside and running parallel with the south wall of the 
south transept, at a distance therefrom of about 4 ft. Why this small 
portion should have been partitioned off from the transept can only be a matter 
of conjecture. The Early English arch jambs which preceded the erection of 
this latter wall are defaced by its erection. 

"Between St. John's Chapel and the sacristy there was a small compartment 
of later construction, approached from the south transept. One pier of the 
exterior wall of the chapel appears to have been cut away when the east wall 
of this compartment was built : to what purpose it was appropriated cannot now 
be stated. 

"Coming to the nave, it is noticeable that it is of later date than the eastern 
portion of the church, bringing it beyond the transition to the Early English, 
as is clearly seen by the section of the south-east pier, which is of the plain and 
pointed bowtell moulding. A portion of the north wall remains. As will be 
seen by the plan it does not run parallel with the other walls of the church. 
There appears to be some little doubt as to the western boundary of the nave. 
We are not inclined to think that it was where a wall line runs across our plan, 
but consider it more likely to have been where there is a return of the plinth of 
a north-west angle pier, the present state of which plinth shews that it was long 



Carro7v Abbey : Chapter II. 



27 



exposed to the weather. Taking this as one view, there remains the cross wall 
above alluded to, which w-e think must have been one of four walls forming 
some enclosure, possibly of the more sacred portion of the convent. A difficulty 
presents itself here, but the present north gable of the house, now occupied by 
Mr. Tillett, M.P., which we have carefully surveyed, shews an abrupt ter- 
mination, which, but for such termination, might have been a continuation of 
roofed or covered-in portions of buildings or ways connecting the apartments 
of the prioress with the west end of the church and also with the cloisters. 
Several good sections of Norman and Early English mouldings, and a cross, a 
portion of a gable finial of good Early English character, were found during 
the recent excavations, which lead us to the conclusion that the buildings were 
richly ornamented. 

" Passing through the south transept we enter a passage or slype which 
separates the church from the chapter-house, having at the south-east comer a 
circular staircase for access to a room which was undoubtedly over it From 
this passage there seems to have been no direct entrance into the chapter-house ; 
but there was a doorway on the west side entering into the cloisters, and on the 
east there was one by which the graveyard was approached. 

"In this graveyard, which is on the south-east side of the church, were found 
several graves, one having over it a marble slab in fair preservation, upon which 
is a mediaeval cross of similar style to the finial one above alluded to : concrete 
beds for other slabs can also be seen. Against the south wall of the chancel 
was found during the excavations a small stone coffin, which we have been 
informed contained the skeleton of a young female : no coffin lid was discovered. 
The burial ground appears to have also extended round to the north side of 
the church, as during the cutting of a new path in Mr. Colman's garden about 
the year 1862 several skeletons were dug up. 

" The chapter-house, which was to the south of the slype, certainly had an 
entrance from the cloister on the west. Next, southward, we come to the 
day-room, at the north-east corner of which are the foundations of steps leading 



2S 



Carrozu Abbey: Chapter II. 



up to a higher level, beyond which is a passage to the necessaria. Though the 
dormitories were probably over the day-room, we do not think it should be 
inferred that these steps formed part of the staircase to it. 

" The day-room had a groined ceiling springing from corbels in the walls, 
and spanning to columns ranging along the centre of the room. One circular 
column still remains ; some of the corbels may still be seen in the west wall. 
Several openings of windows can be traced in the east wall, having splayed 
recesses, and there are also doorway openings. The western wall of the day- 
room was continued beyond the south wall, and can be seen by a slight 
projection and broken section of the wall. Mr. E. A. Tillett, in 1862, traced 
this for some yards further than it is at present, there being at that date a ditch 
on the eastern side, which has since been filled up. The wall evidently met 
another running at right angles with it and in a direct line to the foundations 
of the walls at the south-eastern boundary of the precincts, and which we 
conceive may have been those of the infirmary. They were certainly the walls 
of some important buildings connected with the convent. 

" The buildings on the south side of the cloister have been entirely 
demolished. Here the refectory was undoubtedly situated, as fragments of 
wall have from time to time been found, which shew that there were extensive 
buildings on this side of the cloister. On Mr. Tillett's lawn there is a 
rectangular piece of wall about three feet out of the ground, running north and 
east. This shews an external face on the south and west sides. The north and 
east shew it plastered, and we think we may safely say this was the south-west 
angle of the outer wall of the cloister. In dry seasons extensions of these 
walls have been traced, the grass being then withered. 

" The original strangers' or guest hall seems to have been pulled down 
and replaced by new buildings more to the west, in the time of Isabell 
Wygan, whose rebus appears no less than four times in the only now 
habitable portion of the priory, which we have before stated consists of the 
strangers' hall, with the prioress' parlour and a semi-circular staircase turret, 



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Carroiu Abbey: CJiaptcr II. 



up to a higher level, beyond which is a passage to the neccssaria. Though the 
dormitories were probably over the day-room, we do not think it should be 
inferred that these steps formed part of the staircase to it. 

" The day-room had a groined ceiling springing from corbels in the walls, 
and spanning to columns ranging along the centre of the room. One circular 
column still remains ; some of the corbels may still be seen in the west wall. 
Several openings of windows can be traced in the cast wall, having splayed 
recesses, and there are also doorway openings. The western wall of the day- 
room Avas continued beyond the south wall, and can be seen by a slight 
projection and broken section of the wall. Mr. E. A. Tillett, in 1S62, traced 
this for some yards further than it is at present, there being at that date a ditch 
on the eastern side, which has since been filled up. The wall evidently met 
another running at right angles with it and in a direct line to the foundations 
of the walls at the south-eastern boundary of the precincts, and which we 
conceive may have been those of the infirmary. They were certainly the walls 
of some important buildings connected with the convent. 

" The buildings on the south side of the cloister have been entirely 
demolished. Here the refectory was undoubtedly situated, as fragments of 
wall have from time to time been found, which shew that there were extensive 
buildings on this side of the cloister. On ]\Ir. Tillett's lawn there is a 
rectangular piece of wall about three feet out of the ground, running north and 
cast. This shews an external face en the south and west sides. The north and 
east shew it plastered, and we think we may safely say this was the south-west 
angle of the outer wall of the cloister. In dry seasons extensions of these 
walls have been traced, the grass being then withered. 

" The original strangers' or guest hall seems to have been pulled down 
and replaced by new buildings more to the west, in the time of Isabell 
Wygan, whose rebus appears no less than four times in the only now 
habitable portion of the priory, which we have before stated consists of the 
strangers' hall, with the prioress' parlour and a semi-circular staircase turret, 




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Carrow Abbey : Chapter II. 



29 



in which is a portion of a closed staircase, landing at a chamber over, and 
shewing a plastered soffit. 

" The walls of the parlour are panelled out with oak, ribbed and moulded 
panelling, out of which opens a segmental flat-arched fireplace, having square 
mantel, in the spandrils of which are shields bearing the rebus, y and a gun. 
The doors of this room are linen-moulded ; the ceiling has heavy moulded 
beams and ribs. In the spandrils at the head of the oak door frame to the 
present entrance hall are shields bearing the rebus of VVygan, and the same 
appear in spandrils to the door frame at the entrance to the present kitchen 
apartments. In this case the y takes its form in stags' horns, and the gun the 
form of a blunderbuss. This door we believe to be in its original position." 



A very interesting description of the Hall and Parlour, and the stained 
glass in them, as they appeared to Anthony Norris about the year 17..., is given 
by him in his collection now in my library, and is as follows : — 

"■ The old hall is yet remaining, in the windows whereof are the following arms painted 

on the glass.' 

" These arms were all of them, as I take it, put up since the dissolution of the house, 
by the family of the Sheltons. The first of the foregoing shields is Bacon quartering 
Butts. Sir Nicholas Bacon, Bart., son of Sir Nicholas, Lord Keeper, temp. Ehzabeth, 
married Ann, sole daughter and heir to Ed. Butts of Thornage in Norfolk. These are the 
old arms of the Bacons, now quite disused. 

" The second shield is the arms of the Heveninghams of Ketteringham in Norfolk. 

•• The third shield is the arms of the Knevets. 



' Blomeficld says that in the Hall east window were— (i) Skelton impaling Barrow; and (2) Gules, 
on a cross ingrailed sable five escallops [ ] : and describes the rest as being in the west windows. 



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30 



Qirnnv Abbey : Chapter IT. 



"The fourth shield was the arms of Sir Ralph Shelton, Knt., temp. Elizabeth, and of 

his second wife, daughter of Barrowe. The arms were broken, but the 

names remaining. 

" The fifth is Calthorpe impaling Drewry. 

" The sixth is Woodhoivse impaling Repps, and is the coat of Sir Thomas Woodhowse 
of Waxham, Knt. (who died A.D. 1571), and of Ann his wife, daughter to John Repps of 
Walpole, gent. 

"The seventh shield is the arms of Sir John Shelton, Knt. (father of Sir Ralph 

Shelton, Knt., before mentioned), and of Margaret his wife, daughter to Parker, 

Lord Morley. Note that both the Lovells and the Parkers, who successively inherited the 
title of Lord Morley, bore the Black Lion, which was the ancient arms of the Morleys. 

"The eighth shield is the coat of Lovcll, Lord Morley, and is quarterly of 

eight : l, Morley; 2, Lovell of Titchmersh ; 3, Holland; 4, Deuicourt ; 5, Dehpole ; 
6, Wingfield; 7, Mareschall (these two last are by mistake transposed in the drawing) ; 

" The ninth shield is impaled — the first coat quarterly of four : i and 4, Catvdy ; 2 and 
3, Bassingbourn. The second coat is quarterly of sue : 1, Wootton ; 2, Berdewell, 3, 
Erpingham; 4, Phelip; 5, Fumeaux; 6, Wychingham. 

"The tenth shield is likewise impaled— the first coat is quarterly of six: i, 

Cornwallis; 2, [Sable, three bars gemellesj ; 3, Braham; 4, Argent, a bend between 

three crosslets fitch^e sable, ; 5, Tyrrell; 6, Duke. The second [impaled] coat was 

quarterly of eight : i, Jernegan; 2, Inglethorpe; 3, Fitz Osbert; 4, which is quite gone, 
was Marling; 5, Mortimer; 6, Gonvill ; 7, Keldon; 8, Clifton. 

" Through the hall is a large parlour, in the windows of which are the following coats, 
which seem to have been designed for a perfect pedigree of the Shelton family. They 
were at first, without doubt, placed in a regular order; but some of them are now 
misplaced. In the east [parlour] window' [Blomefield says in " the Hall " windows] :— 

1. Shelton, Azure, a cross or. 

2. Shelton impaling Harltng. 

3» M » lU* or IlUgh, Ermine^ two chevrons sable. 



» Blomefield describes these at vol. iv., p. 529. He also gives a coat as being in the east window— 
"Gules, on a cross engrailed sable five escallops," which is not figured here. 



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V. 



"The fourth shield was the arms of Sir Ralph Shclton, Knt., temp. Elizabeth, and of 
his second wife, daughter of Barrowe. The arms were broken, but the 



names rcmammg. 



" The fifth is Calthorpe impaling Drt-iiny. 

" The sixth is Woodhoicse impaling Repps, and is the coat of Sir Thomas Woodhowse 
of Waxham, Knt. (who died A.D. 1571), and of Ann his wife, daughter to John Repps of 
Walpole, gent. 

"The seventh shield is the arms of Sir John Shelton, Knt. (father of Sir Ralph 

Shclton, Knt., before mentioned), and of Margaret his wife, daughter to Parker, 

Lord Morley. Note that both the Lovells and the Parkers, who successively inherited the 
title of Lord Morley, bore the Ulack Lion, which was the ancient arms of the Morlcys. 

"The eighth shield is the coat of Lo\cll, Lord Morley, and is quarterly of 

eight: i, Morley; 2, Lovell of Titchmcrsh ; 3, Holland; 4, Deincoiirl ; 5. Delapcle ; 
6, Witigjield; 7, Mareschall (these two last are by mistake transposed in the drav.ing) ; 
8, 

" The ninth shield is impaled— the first coat luarterly of four : i and 4, Gatjdy ; 2 and 
3, Bassiiigbouni. The second coat is quarterly of six : I, ll'oottoti ; 2, BadtWtll, 3, 
ErpiHghavi ; 4, Phelip; 5, Fiirneaux; 6, Wychingluwi. 

"The tenth shield is likewise impaled— the first coat is quarterly of six: I, 

Cornwallis; 2, [Sable, three bars gemelles], ; 3, Brahnm; 4, Argent, a bend between 

three crosslets fitchee sable ; 5, Tyrrell; 6, Duke. The second [impaled] coat was 

quarterly of eight : 1, Jernegan; 2, Ini;lethorpe; 3, Fitz Osbert ; 4, which is quite gone, 
was Marling; 5, Mortimer; 6, Gonvill ; 7, Keldon; 8, Cli/ton. 

" Through the hall is a large parlour, in the windows of which are the following coats, 
which seem to have been designed for a perfect pedigree of the Shclton family. They 
were at first, without doubt, placed in a regular order; but some of them are now 
misplaced. In the east [parlour] window =« [Biomefield says in " the Hall " windows] : — 

1. Shelton, Azure, a cross or. 

2. Shelton impaling Hjrling. 

3» »» fi Illi or Illegh, Ermine, two chevrons sable. 



^ Biomefield describes these at vol. iv., p. 529. He also gives a coat as being in the east window — 
*' Gules, on a cross engrailed sable five escallops," which is not figured here. 













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Car row Abbey: Chapter II, 



31 



4. Shelton impaling Metiers, Azure, in a bordure per pale wa\7 gules and 

argent ; on a fesse of the second, between 
three crowns or, three mascles conjoined (?) of 
the field. 
„ St. Ptiilibert, Argent, three bendlets azure. 
„ Vaux^ Cheeky argent and gules. 

JSurys, Ermine, on a chief indented sable two lions rampant 



6. 
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„ Gedding^ Argent, three mullets sable. 



In the West Window. 



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17. 

18. 

19. 

20. 

21. 
22. 



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Uvedate or Owdate, Azure, a cross moline gules. 

Lowdtiam, Argent, three inescutcheons, two and one, 
sable. 

Coclifield, Azure, a cross cheeky argent and gules. 

Stapteton [blank shield, wrongly lettered Stapulam]. 

Baret^ Argent, a fess between three mullets sable. 

Ufford, Sable, a cross engrailed or. 

Brewse [blank shield]. 

Ctere. 

Martte^ Per pale ermine and azure, a lion rampant counter- 
changed within a bordure sable bezant^e. 



„ „ Boteyn. 

[Blank shield, lettered SJutioK, impaling IVoodkouse, quartering Barowe."] 
Shetton impaling Mortey. 

.. ,. two blank shields. 



" The arms on the woman's side of the twelfth and fifteenth shields were broken and 
destroyed, as was also the whole nineteenth shield ; but the names which were painted on 
the glass under the arms, are still remaining. The two last were originally blank 

impalements. [For all the foregoing, see plates lettered 181 to 185.] 

F 



32 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter II. 



" On the left-hand side of the great gateway are two large rooms, one over the other, 
each having a stone bow window. These rooms (as I conjecture) were the halls where the 
strangers and boarders dined : the men probably in the one, and the women in the other. 
In the bow window of the lower room are the two following shields— [See plate 

lettered 186.] 

"The first of these shields is impaled ; the first quarterly of four : I, Blennerhasset j 
2, Loudam; 3, broken out ; 4, Keldon. The second (or impaled coat) is likewise quarterly 
of four : I and 4, Tindallj 2nd, broken out ; 3rd, Scales.* 

"The second shield is the arms of In a window in one of the chambers. 

[See plate lettered 186.] 

"These are the arms of John Wychyngham, Esq., who lived in the reign of Henry 
VII., and of Ann his wife, daughter to Thomas Bramton, Esq. 

" Of the four following shields the two former were carved in wood over the great hall 
door, on the outside ; and the two latter were likewise car\ed in wood, on the chimney- 
piece of the great parlour. [See plate 187.] 

"What these shields were designed for I know not," says Norris; [but they are clearly 
the rebus of Isabella Wygun— a y and a gun.— W.R.] 



" The guest hall was divided into five bays, as seen by the flat open timber 
roof, which has four whole and two half heavy moulded principal beams and 
framed spandrils, which are filled in with perforated cusped tracery ; in the 
southernmost one having a carved rose in each spandril, and the next a 
shamrock, the next the letter ® crowned, the next an eagle, the next a Y 
and a gun, and the last a rose. We need hardly say that the carvings in the 
above spandril tracery allude to England, Ireland, the Virgin Mary, and Saint 
John (to whom the convent was dedicated), and to Isabell VVygan the prioress, 
during whose time the roof was doubtless constructed. 



« For John Blennerhasset of Frense, and Jane his second wife, daughter of Sir Thomas Sendal of 
Hockwold. He died 1510. 

















^fie^/ixgio/fAtft. jiLUlt/t i^ ilfr^P^ fK^/txtf- at4^kJtir»t^ o/"^ 










CarroiJ Abbey : Clial^Lr IL 



" On the left-hand side of the great gateway arc two large rooms, one over the other, 
each having a stone bow window. These rooms (as I conjecture) were the halls v.here the 
strangers and boarders dined : the men probibly in the one, and the women in the other. 
In the bow window of the lower room are the two following shields— [See plate 

lettered i86.] 

"The first of these shields is impaled; the first quarterly of four : i, Blciincrhasset ; 
2, Loudam; 3, broken out ; 4, KcUon. The :,econd (or impaled coat) is likewise ciuarterly 
of four : 1 and 4, Timiall ; 2nd, broken out ; 3rd, Scales.^ 

"The second shield is the arms of In a window in one of the chamljers. 

[See plate lettered 1S6.] 

"These are the arms of John Wychyngham, Esq., who lived in the reign of Henry 
VII., and of Ann his wife, daughter to Thomas Hramton, Esq. 

"Of the four following shields the two former were carved in wood over the great hall 
door, on the outside ; and the two latter were likewise carved in wood, on the chimney- 
piece of the great parlour. [See plate 1S7.] 

" What these shields were designed for 1 know not," says Norris ; [but they are clearly 
the rebus of Isabella Wygun— a y and a gun.— W.R.] 



" The crucst hall was divided into five ba>-s, as seen by the flat open timber 
roof, which has four whole and two half heavy moulded principal beams and 
framed spandrils, which arc filled in with perforated cusped tracery; in the 
southernmost one having a carved rose in each spandril, and the next a 
shamrock, the next the letter XH crowned, the next an eagle, the next a Y 
and a gun, and the last a rose. We need hardly say that the carvings in the 
above spandril tracery allude to England, Ireland, the Virgin Mary, and Saint 
John (to whom the convent was dedicated), and to Isabell Wygan the prioress, 
during whose time the roof was doubtless constructed. 



* For John Blennerhasset of Frense, and Jane his second wfe, daughter of Sir Thomas Scndal of 
Hockwold. He died 1510. 












((T-lt-^. — •■ 





%e^/ixsi o/fAtft, Jku£a/t t^ ilfr^3t> f^^/txsf- ouu&Jtl^l^^ 



Sti A Uftrxoleu* of Ot^e, ef fA^^ Cfi ct*rv4f>i^. 
















'¥t.ou3 rvoi 






r 









rAr' 









Car row Abbey : Chapter II. 



JO 



" The first bay on the west side opens with a Perpendicular arch and piers 
into a rectangular bay, now filled in with a modern staircase, leading to a floor 
dividing this building into two stories. The window frame, as at present, is 
not wholly original. 

«' It is curious that the somewhat rare Aristolochia clematitis or birthwort 
still grows .freely amongst the ruins. Can it be a struggling survivor from the 
herb garden of the nuns ? 

" Before the recent alterations to the grounds were made, the house was 
approached through a lane which ran by the side of Mr. Colman's house. The 
abbey was on the right-hand side of this lane, and on the left were three or four 
recently-built cottages. In one of them lived (about 1 860-61) a very old man 
named Wright. He told Mr. E. A. Tillett that on the right-hand side of the 
gate was a public-house formerly kept by his cousin Jacob Wright, but he 
could not remember the sign. This was probably the lodge or gatehouse 
mentioned by Blomefield. He also told a story of how a cowkceper named 
Edward Meek, who formerly lived in the kitchen part of the Abbey, pulled up 
the skirting board under the window of the parlour, and found there a sum of 
money, which enabled him to hire a farm at Hanwell Another of his stories 
was how a stone coflfin was found standing up end-ways a little lov.er than the 
gate, which would be near the church, whilst men were digging for chalk.. 
Of course he was full of subterraneous passages, specially related, and how 
a fat pig wandered, itinerated, and strolled down one, and was never seen 

more. 

" A few words on the parochial church of St. James at Carrow, which was 

in the patronage of the nuns, may not be out of place. 

" Mr. Phipson, in his paper (see Appendix XH.), says that it is not known 
where it stood, and that some thought it was the nave of the priory church, but 
we have a note that it stood at the bottom of the * great hill.' Blomefield says 
it is ' now so totolly demolished tliat there are no apparent ruins, though its 

F 2 



34 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter IT. 



site is still called the Churchyard.' It was not demolished till after 1556, in 
which year Lady Anne, widow of Sir John Shelton, Knight, by her will, directs 
her body to be buried there. 

"The image of St. James is mentioned in the will, dated 1549, of Robert 
Everard, Chaplain of Carrow, who desires to be buried there before it— Aleyn, 
fo. 39." 



The chief feature of interest at Carrow now is the unique collection of 
books, maps, engravings, drawings, and paintings, and the works of authors 
connected with the city and county, which have been collected and brought 
together by Mr. J. J. Colman, M.P. As a catalogue of the library is now in 
the press, it will be sufficient to enumerate here some of the contents : — 

The library contains a very complete collection of Topographical Works, 
Municipal and Parliamentary Registers, Poll Books, Statutes, Corporation 
Accounts, Reports of Municipal and Charitable Institutions, Works on the 
Agriculture, the Fauna and Flora, and the Geology of the county. 

The works of the Divines include original editions of the writings of Bale, 
Becon, Hall, Sutton, Ames, and a collection of the rare writings of the 
Brownists, a sect originating in Norfolk. 

The works of the Poets include first editions of Skelton, Southwell, 
Fletcher, Suckling, and others. 

Amongst the early printed books will be found a fine specimen of the 
printing of Antony de Solempne, and many works printed by Francis Burgess 
and Henry Crossgrove. 

There is also a very complete collection of Engraved Norfolk Portraits, 
arranf^ed in eleven large folio volumes ; books of Norfolk Views and Etchings ; 
a collection of Newspapers, from the commencement of the eighteenth century 
to the present time ; and several large folio volumes, containing a unique series 




The Quests* or Strangers' Hall, now the Library^ 



34 



Carnm Abbey: Chapter II. 



site is still called the Churchyard.' It was not demolished till after 1556, in 
which year Lady Anne, widow of Sir John Shelton, Knight, by her will, direct-* 
her body to be buried there. 

"The image of St. James is mentioned in the will, dated 1549, of Robert 
Everard, Chaplain of Carrow, who desires to be buried there before it.— Aleyn, 
fo. 39" 



The chief feature of interest at Carrow now is the unique collection of 
books, maps, engravings, drawings, and paintings, and the works of authors 
connected with the city and county, which have been collected and brought 
together by Mr. J. J. Colman, M.P. As a catalogue of the library is now in 
the press, it will be sufficient to enumerate here some of the contents :— 

The library contains a very complete collection of Topographical Works, 
Municipal and Parliamentary Registers, Poll Books, Statutes, Corporation 
Accounts, Reports of ]Municipal and Charitable Institutions, Works on the 
Agriculture, the Fauna and Flora, and the Geology of the county. 

The works of the Divines include original editions of the writings of Bale, 
Becon, Hall, Sutton, Ames, and a collection of the rare writings of the 
Brownists, a sect originating in Norfolk. 

The works of the Poets include first editions of Skelton, Southwell, 
Fletcher, Suckling, and others. 

Amongst the early printed books will be found a fine specimen of the 
printing of Antony de Solempne, and many works printed by Francis Burgess 
and Henry Crossgrove. 

There is also a very complete collection of Engraved Norfolk Portraits, 
arranged in eleven large folio volumes; books of Norfolk Views and Etchings ; 
a collection of Newspapers, from the commencement of the eighteenth century 
to the present time ; and several large folio volumes, containing a unique series 




The Guests- or Strangers' Hall, now the Library. 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter II. 



35 



of Electioneering Squibs, Broadsides, &c., illustrating the political history of 

the county from an early date. 

Arranged on the walls of the Abbey are important Pictures in Oil by the 
Cromes, the Cotmans, Vincent, Stark, and the Stannards. There is also a 
large Collection of Drawings and Studies by Artists of the Norwich School, 
besides Cases of rare Ornithological Specimens which have been killed in the 
county, Local Antiquities, and Specimens of Old Oak Furniture. 

The number of volumes forming the Norfolk Library is about 4000, many 
of them containing twenty and more pamphlets. 





1 




CHAPTER III. 







HE numbers of the nuns, and their income, varied considerably from 
time to time. Norris collected with great care all the information 
he found on the subject from the Account Rolls, which are now, 
unluckily, not to be found, and from his collections I have compiled the 
following table : — 

STRENGTH OF PRIORY. 



DATK. 

15-16 Edward I. 
10 Edward II. 
9 Edward III. 
as 
a6 

34 

4« 



>» 



44 
46 



»» 



Prioress and twenty nuns 

(?) 

(?) 



Prioress and six nuns 

Prioress and nine nuns 

Prioress and fifteen nuns (of whom 

five died in 42 Edward III.) ... 

Prioress and eight nuns 

Prioress and eight nuns 

G 



INCOME. 
£, s. d. 

• • • • 

182 3 8 

165 8 5 

116 17 5 
(?) 

173 4 o 

(?) 

(?) 
170 13 2 



;8 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter III. 





DATE. 


31 


Richard II. 


s 


»» 


7 


>> 


9 


I* 


II 


n 


13 


f* 


15 


»» 


8 


Henry IV. 


2 


Henry V. 


5 


M 


6 


Henry VI. 


9 


>» 


15 


»» 


17 


t» 


aj 


*• 


25 


»» 


36 


w 


27 


n 


3P 


>t 


31 


>* 



STRENGTH OF PRIORY. 
(:] •..•••• •>• ••• 

Prioress and fourteen nuns 
Prioress and fourteen nuns 
(f^ •••••• ••• ••• 

Prioress and twelve nuns ... 
Prioress and thirteen nuns ... 
Prioress and twelve nuns ... 
Prioress and fourteen nuns 

(?) 

Prioress and ten nuns 
Prioress and nine nuns 

(?) 

Prioress and fourteen nuns 

Prioress and sixteen nuns ... 

^r^ . ...*•• ••• ••• 

Prioress and fourteen nuns 

(?) 

(?) 

(?) 



INCOME 

I- s. 
141 12 


d. 

2 


r?) 




13s 





178 4 


8J 


(?) 




(?) 




158 12 


8 


118 19 


7 


150 5 


9 


119 12 


9 


75 19 


8 


99 13 


5 


240 4 


6 


ISO 5 


9 


117 10 


2 


112 13 


4 


125 15 


I 


149 13 


10 


169 2 


I 



PRIORESSES. 

The following is a list of all the Prioresses of whom I have been able to 
find mention : — 



Matilda Lestrange, from 1198 to 1222. 

Agnes de Montchensy, from 1230 to 1247. (Perhaps longer, to 1249.) She may have been 
a daughter of Agnes, the widow of Warin de Montecaniso, who was alive 30 Henry II. 

(1183). 
Magdalen in the year 1264. 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter III. 



39 



PctroniUa in the year 1290, 18 Edward I. Norris says anniversaries were celebrated 

in 19 Edward I. for her soul, so she could not have been long prioress. Dugdale says 

she died 1289. 
Amabilia de Ufford, from 1290 to 1294. She died the Thursday before the Feast of 

St. Benedict, 12th January, and was buried here. 
Catherine de Wendling, from 1294 to 131 1. 
Beatrice de Holm, chosen on the ides (13th) of January, 13" ; she sat till she died in 1325 

(18 Edward II.) 
Agnes de Cariton, pridie non. (6th) Octobris, 1325. She was installed by Master Nicholas 
de Rudham, Fellow Commoner with the nuns and their priests and chaplains, who had 
hitherto always installed the prioresses, the monastery claiming to be exempt from all 
episcopal jurisdiction. Norris says she died about Christmas, i Edward III. (1327), and 
elsewhere speaks of the nuns paying 15^. for masses for her soul in 19 Edward HI. 

(1335)- 
Agnes de Lenn, 3rd calends June (30th May), 1328 ; she died about 1341- 
Margaret de St. Edmund. She sat but a short time, and died before confirmation. 
Cecily de Plumsted, 19th April, 1341- 
Alice de Hetherset, 13th July, 1349. 

Margerj- Catt, 27th January, 1365-6. Buried at Carrow (Dugdale). 
Margerj' de Euges or Enges, 15th September, 1369. 
Editha de Wylton. 8th January, 1396-7. She was prosecuted for harbouring in sanctuar)- the 

murderess of William Koc of Trows, and is said to have been committed to gaol, tried, 

and acquitted. 
Alice VVar>n, 22nd June, 1430- 

Margaret Pygot, 12th February, 1444-5- (Blomefield has her Bygot, in error.) 
Alice Pygot, 1457. Ralph Pygot was a Spicer of Nonvich 20 Henry VI. {Norwich Freemen), 

and as his wife's name was Margaret {Blomefield, iv. p. 132) he may have been father to 

both these prioresses. 
Joan Spalding. I find her prioress A.D. 1466; but it seems she was not confirmed till 

6th March, 1472. 
Catherine Segr>me, 14th June, 1491. Her brother Ralph Segryme, clerk, of London, gave 

;^3. 6j. Zd. in 1494-5 to the Priory, for his souL 
Isabell Wygon. I find her prioress A.D. 15 12, but she was not confirmed till 1514- She is 

the last prioress that I find any mention of, and there is Uttle doubt she was the 

G 2 



40 



Carroii) Abbey: Chapter III. 



last of all. She was alive and prioress in 24 Henry VIII., as appears by the Roll of 
that year, which is but three years before the dissolution of the House, but if she died 
in the interim, and any other were chosen, it was probably 
Cicely Stafford, whom Mr. Willis says was of this House, and had a pension of ;^5 per annum 
at the Dissolution, and from thence only supposes her to have been the last prioress. 
(Cecilia Suffield occurs as a nun in 1526 and 1532, and this surname is more likely to be 
correct. There is little doubt that she was the " surrender prioress," and that her name 
is Suffield, not Stafford. She had a pension of ;^8.) 



Next in order, of course, came the — 



SUB-PRIORESSES' AND SACRISTS. 



Mary Ufford, in i Edward III. sub-prioress. 

Margery de Todenham, sub-prioress, 17 and 23 Henry VI. 

Alice Pemel, sacrist, 32 Edward III. 

Catherine Betterings, sacrist, 46 Edward III. 

Cecily Ryall or Reyel, sacrist, 20 and 21 Edward IV., 1 and 2 Richard III. (She was daughter 
of Adam Ryall of Sloley, whose will was proved 1466.) 

Joan Spaldyng, prioress, exercised her office of sacrist 6 and 7 Edward IV. 

Margery Folcard, sacrist, 8 Edward IV. (She was sister of Thomas Folcard, rector of 
Heigham, who by his will, proved 1461, left her dr. M, and a cup of amber ; and daughter 
of John Folcard, alderman of Norwich, who by his will, proved 1464, left her 40</.) 

Ann Martin, sub-prioress, 15 14. 

Margaret Steward, sub-prioress, 1532. 

Agnes Swanton, 1526-32. 



• Third and even fourth sub-prioresscs are mentioned. 



Car row Abbey : Chapter III. 



41 



CELLARESSES. 



Catherine 14 John, 1213. 

Joan 15 Edward I. 

Margery de Bryton, 16, 17, 18, and 20 Edward I. 

Agnes de Lenn, 21 Edward I. 

Joan de Erlham, 22 Edward I. 

Agnes de Thelnetham, 23 Edward I. Dead by 25 Edward I., when four marks were paid to a 

chaplain at Castre for her soul's repose. 
Agnes de Carlton, 24, 25, 26, and 27 Edward I. 
Rose de Crepping, 32, 34, 35 Edward I. and 2 Edward II. 
The same, with Joan le Eritoun, 10 Edward II. 
Joan le Breton only, 11 Edward II. 
Rose de Crepping, 15 Edward II., in part of the year. 
Cecily de Plumsted, 15 Edward II., in part. 
Rose de Crepping, 16 Edward II. 

The same, with Margery de St. Edmund, 17 and 18 Edward II. 
Margery de St Edmund and Elizabeth D'Argentein, 19 Edward II. 
Margery de St. Edmund, Elizabeth D'Argentein, and Matilda le Groos, 20 Edward II., and 

(part of ) I Edward III. 
Margery de St. Edmund (part of) 10 Edward III., and 2, 3, and 4 Edward III. 
Julian de Hedirsete, 6, 8, 9, 11, and 12 Edward III. 
Margaret de Hackford, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, and 19 Edward III. 
Alice de Hedirsete, in the former part of 20 Edward III. 
Margaret de Hackford, in the latter part of 20 Edward III., and in the former part of 

21 Edward III. 
Sibill de Fastolf, in the latter end of 21 Edward III. 
Sibill de Fastolf and Margery de Euges, 23 Edward III. 
Sibill de Fastolf, 24, 25, and 26 Edward III. 
Sibill de Fastolf and Catherine Verley, 27 Edward III. 
Sibill de Fastolf, 28 Edward III. 
Catherine Verley, part of 28 Edward III., and 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, and 

39 Edward III. 
Joane Parke, in the latter part of 39 Edward III., 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, and 45 Edward III. 



42 



Carrou Abbey : Chapter III. 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter III. 



43 



Editha de Wylton. She entered the office on St. Valentine's Day, 46 Edward III., 47, 48, and 

49 Edward III., and in the former part of 2 Richard II. 
Joane Parke, in the latter part of 2 Richard II., 3, 6, and 7 Richard II. 
Margaret Baryngton, part of 8 Richard II. 
Joane Parke, part of 8 Richard II., 9 and part of 10 Richard II. 
Margaret Baryngton, part of 10 Richard II., 11, 12, and part of 13 Richard II. 
Margaret atte Parke, part of 13 Richard II., 14, 15, and 16 Richard II. 
Joane Parke, part of 16 Richard II., 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, and 23 Richard II., and r, 3, 

5, and 6 Henry IV. 
Margaret Baryngton, 8, 9, 10, 11, and part of 12 Henry IV. 

Agnes Garbald, part of 12 Henry IV., 13 and 14 Henry IV., and i, 2, and 3 Henry V. 
Lettice Eton, 5, 7, and 9 Henry V., 3, 4, 5. 6, 7, and 9 Henry VI. 
Margaret Gappe, 15 Henry VI. 
Agnes Kyng, 17 Henry VI. 

Margaret Pygot, 20 Henry VI. (afterwards Prioress.) 
Agnes Kyng, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, and 32 Henry VI. 
Margery Folcard, i and 3 Edward IV. 

Joan Spaldyng, exercised the office of cellaress in 14 Edward IV., and in some other years. 
Mary White, in some year between 14 and 20 Edward IV. 

Margery Palmer, 20 and 22 Edward IV.. i and 3 Richard III., and i and 2 Henry VII. 
Catherine Sygryme, 4 and 5 Henry VII. 
Joane Greene, 8, 10, 15, 16, 17, and 18 Henry VII. 
Isabell Wygon, 21, 22, 23. and 24 Henry VII., 1, 2, and 3 Henry VIII, in which year she was 

chosen prioress, but continued to exercise the office of cellaress in 3, 6, 7, 9, 10, 20, 22, 23, 

and 24 Henry VIII., and prcbably to the dissolution of the house. 



NUNS. 

The following is as complete a list of all the. nuns as I have been able to 
compile : — 

Allyn, Agathy; nun, 3 Edward II. 

Argentein, Elizabeth; joint cellaress, 19 Edward II., 20 Edward II., and i Edward III. 



Barbour, Isabel ; nun, 23 Henry VI. (she had been a boarder in John VI.) 

Bardolf, Isabell ; nun, 20 Edward I. 

Baryngton, Margaret; cellaress, in part of 8, 10, 11, 12, and 13 Richard II., 8, 9, 10, u and 

part of 12 Henry IV. 
Bassingboumc, Alice de ; nun, 25 Edward I. 

Bendysh, Joan; daughter of Robert Bendysh, professed, 27 Edward III. 
Bertram, Elizabeth ; nun, daughter of John Bertram, will proved in 1462. 

„ Isabel; nun, 26 Henry VI. 
Betterings or Bitterings, Catherine; nun, 44 Edward III.; sacrist, 46 Edward III. 
Bliklyng, daughter of Will. Bliklyng, professed 41 Edward III. 
Botulph, Johanne; nun, 1 526-1 532. 
Bound, Johanna ; nun, 1 532. 

Breton or Britonn, Joan le; cellaress, 10 and 11 Edward II. 
Browne, Christian; nun, 1532. 

Bryton, Margery de; cellaress, 16, 17, 18, and 20 Edward I. 
Burghward, Alice; nun, 2 Edward III. 
Carhouse, Margery; nun, 1492-1514. 

Carlton, Agnes de; cellaress, 24, 25, 26, 27 Edward I.; prioress, 1325. 
Carrow, Alice de, probably daughter of Alina de Rye and John le Marescall. 

Catherine ; cellaress, 14 John (12 13). 

Catt, Margery; prioress, 1365-6. 

Causton, Alice de ; nun, 20 Edward I. 

Clarke or Clerk, Margery; nun, 1492-1514. 

Crepping, Rosede; cellaress, 32, 34, 35 Edward I. and 2 Edward II.; 10 Edward II.; 15 

Edward II.; 16 Edward II.; 17 and 18 Edward II. 
Curson, Catherine ; nun, 4 Edward II. 

Donne ; professed 15 Richard II. 

EJy, Isabell de ; nun, 3 Edward II. 
Elys, Joan ; nun, 1477. 

Enges or Euges, Mary or Margery de; nun, 15 Edward III.; cellaress, 23 Edward III.; 

prioress, 1369. 
Erlham, Joan de ; cellaress, 22 Edward I. 
Eton, Uttice; ceUaress, 5, 7,9 Henry V., and 3, 4, 5. 6, 7, 9 Henry VI.; nun, 17, 23, and 

26 Henry VI. 



^BffiS 



■ » <■ >' ■ 



44 



Car row Abbey: Chapter III. 



Fastolf, Sibellde; cellaress, in the latter end of 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, and 28 Edward III.; 23 

and 27 Edward III. 
Firmary, Isabel ; nun, 26 Henry VI. 
Folcard, Margaret; nun, 17,23, and 26 Henry VI.; ccUaress, I and 3 Edward IV.; sacrist, 

8 Edward IV. 
Frengos, Joan de; nun, 5 Edward III. 

Gappe, Margaret; cellaress, 15 Henry VI.; nun, 17 and 23 Henry VI. 
Garbald, Agnes ; cellaress, in part of 12 Hcury IV., 13 and 14 Henry IV., and i, 2, and 3 

Henr>' 5. 
Graby, Matilda; nun, 1532. Probably the last professed nun of this priory. 
Greene or Grene, Joan; nun, 1492-1498-1514; cellaress, 8, 10, 15, 16, 17, and 18 Henry VII. 
Groos, Matilda le, Margery de St. Edmund, and Elizabeth d'Argentein; cellaress, 20 Edward II., 

and part of i Edward III. 
Hackford, Margaret de; cellaress, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 19, and 21 Edward III. 
Hammond, Agnes; nun, 1532. 
Hecham, Alice de; nun, 16 Edward I. 
Hedirsete, Alice de; cellaress, in former part of 20 Edward III ; prioress, 1349. 

„ Julian de ; cellaress, 6, 8, 9, 1 1, 12 Edward III. (She had been a boarder here). 

„ Matilda de; nun, 44 Edward III. 
Holbroke, Joan de; nun, 10 Edward II. 
Holm, Beatrice de; prioress, 1311-1325. 

Jerv>s, Catherine; nun, 1492. Described as " precentress and fourth prioress" and professed 
for 38 years to 1526; nun, 1532. 

Joan ; cellaress, 15 Edward I. 

Keech, Isabel ; nun, 26 Henry VI. 

Kerdeston, Margery; nun, 17, 23, and 26 Henry VI. 

Kidman, Margery; nun, "unkind," 15 14. 

King, Agnes; nun, 17 Henry VI. ; cellaress, 17, 23, and 26 Henry VI. 

„ Beatrice; nun, 17, 23, 26, and 32 Henry VI. 
Knight, Margaret— the favourite of Dame Catherine Segrjme, prioress in 1492 (? a nun.) 
Kynyngham, Christian de ; nun, 10 Edward 3. 
Lenn, Agnes de ; cellaress, 21 Edward I.; prioress, 1328-1341. 
Lestrange, Matilda; prioress, 1 198-1222. 
Lightfoot, Joan; nun, 17, 23, and 26 Henry VI. 



\ 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter III. 



45 



Lodnes, Isabel! de ; nun, 23 Edward III. 

Lond (? London), Elizabeth; nun, 18 Edward II. 

London, Ann; nun, 1517; refectoria in 1526 and 1532. 

Magdalen ; prioress, 1264. 

Martyn, Ann; nun (will of Kath. Keene, 1498), daughter of Thomas Martyn, 1492. Sub- 
prioress, 1514; in charge of infirmary, 1532. 
Montchcnsy, Agnes de ; prioress, 1230- 1247. 
Moulton, Matilda de ; nun, 20 Edward I. 
Norwich, Margaret de; nun, 18 Edward II. 
Novo Foro (or Ncwmarch), Alice de ; nun, 10 Edward I. 
Palmer, Margery; cellaress, 20 and 22 Edward IV., i and 3 Richard III., and 12 

Henry VII. 
Parke, Joane ; cellaress in latter part of 39 Edward III., and in the 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, and 45 
Edward III.; 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, and 9 Richard II.; and part of 10 Richard II.; 16, 17, 18, 
19, 20, 21, 22, and 23 Richard II.; and in i, 2, 5, and 6 Henry IV. 
Parke, Margaret atte ; cellaress in part of 13 Richard II., and in 14, 15, and 16 Richard II. 
Parker, Catherine; nun, 19 Edward III. 
Pemel or Pervel, Alice; sacrist, 32 Edward III. 

Petronilla ; prioress, 1290. 

Plumsted, Cecily de; cellaress, part of 15 Edward II. ; prioress, 1341. 

Pygot, Alice ; prioress, 1457. 

Pygot, Margaret; nun, 17 Henry VI.; cellaress, 20 Henry VI.; nun, 23 Henry VI. ; prioress, 

1444.5. 
Reed, Agnes; nun, 17, 23, and 26 Henry VI. 
Riall, Ryall, or Reyel, Cecily ; nun, 1488; daughter of Cecily; sacrist, 20 and 21 Edward IV., 

I and 2 Richard III.; sub-prioress, 1492. 
St. Edmund, Margery de ; 17, 18, 19, and 20 Edward II. ; and part of I, 2, 3, and 4 Edward 

III. ; prioress, 1341. 
Segryme, Catherine ; prioress, 1491 and 1492. 
Sherman, Agnes ; nun, 1492. 
Spalding, Joan; nun, 17, 23, and 26 Henry VI.; sacrist, 6 and 7 Edward IV.; cellaress in 

14 Edward IV. and other years ; prioress, 1466. 
Stafford [Suffield .?], Cicely ; prioress (?). 
Stains, Catherine; nun, 44 Edward III. 



46 



Car row Abbey: Chapter III, 



Steward or Styward, Margaret; nun, 1442-15 14; (daughter of Thomas Styward; will proved 

1500) ; is described as a nun of twenty-eight years standing in 1526 ; sub-prioress, 1532. 
Suffield, Cecilia; nun, 1526 to 1532. 
Swanton, Agnes ; sacrist in 1526 and 1532. 
Sygryme, Catherine; cellaress, 4 and 5 Henry VII. 

n n mentioned in will of Margaret Skipwith, 1488. 

Thelnetham, Agnes de ; cellaress, 23 Edward I. 

Todenham, Margery de; nun, 23 Henry VI. : sub-prioress, 17 and 23 Henry VI. 
Tweyt, Cecil de; nun, 7 Edward III. 
Ufiford, Amabilia de ; prioress, 1290- 1294. 
„ Mary; sub-prioress, i Edward III. 
A'erley, Catherine, and Sibill de Fastolf ; cellaresses, 27 Edward III. 
Verley, Catherine ; cellaress, in part of 28 Edward III., and in 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 

37, 38, and 39 Edward III. 
Verley, Mary le; nun, 23 Edward III. 
Verly, Catherine; nun, 44 Edward III. 

Warner, Agnes; nun, 1514-1526. In charge of Infirmary, 1532. 
Waryn, Alice ; prioress, 1430. 
Wasingle, Amitia de ; nun, 17 Edward II. 
Weelar, Isabel; nun, 17 Henry VI. 
Welan, Isabel Barber.'; nun, 1459. 
Wells, Marger)' ; nun, 1492. 
Wendling, Catherine de ; prioress, 1294-1311. 
Wethcrby, Alice ; nun, daughter of Thomas VVetherby, 17, 23, and 26 Henry VI. (she had 

been a boarder.) 
White, Mary; nun, daughter of William Whyte, 1492 ; cellaress in some years between 14 and 

20 Edward IV. 
Wilby, Letticede; nun, i Edward III. 
Windeshore, EUzabeth; nun, 18 Edward II. 
Wirmgay, Isabell de ; nun, 20 Edward I. 
Woodhouse, Margery; nun, 1492. 
Wygon, Isabell; cellaress, 21, 22, 23, and 24 Henry VII. ; i, 2, and 3 Henry VIII. ; 3, 6, 7, 9, 

10, 20, 22, 23, and 24 Henry VIII., and probably to the dissolution of the House; 

prioress, 1512. 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter III, 



47 



VVylby (or Willoughby), Alice ; nun, 44 Edward III., 17 and 23 Henry VI. 

Wylton, Editha de ; cellaress, 46, 47, 48, and 49 Edward III., 2 Richard II.; prioress, 1396-7. 

Wyncheston, Alice de; nun, 22 Edward III. 

Wyth, Agnes; nun, 6 Edward III. 

Vermouth, Joan de ; nun, 25 Edward I. 

Yerston, Alice de; nun, 10 Edward II. 



The Other benefactors to the priory mentioned by Norris, and not included 
in the Appendix : — 



Alderford, Edmund de, 44 Edward III. 
Apleyard, Bartholomew, 9 Richard II. 
Asgar, William (de.?), 40 Edward III. 
Aslak, William, 15-16 Henry VIII. 
Baldwin, H., chaplain, 25 Henry VI. 
Bardolf, The Lady, 25 Henry VI. 
Beatrice, servant of Cecily de Kerdeston, 

9 Henry IV. 
Bemham, William, 25 Henry VI. 
Bertram, John, 21 Henry VI. 
Blickling, Simon de, 41 Edward III., 9 

Richard II. 
Blickling, Margaret, 30 Henry VI. 

„ Robert, 30 Henry VI. 
Bodham, Richard de, 34 Edward III. 
Brigham, Guido de, 7 Richard II. 
Brosyerd, John, 31 Henry VI. 
Bumstede, Thomas de, 40 Edward III., 

9 Richard II. 
Bumstide, Robert de, 41 Edward III. 



Cook, William, 44 Edward III., 9 Richard II. 
Cubytt, William, 15-16 Henry VIII. 
Deye, John, chaplain, 30 Henry VI. 
Dykkes, John, 21 Henry VI. 
Elys, John, wife of, 44 Edward III. 
Erpingham, John de, 34 Edward III. 

„ Sir Thomas de, 9 Henry IV. 

Felbrygge, Lady, 31 Henry VI. 
Gememutha, Lady Joan de, 25 Edward I. 
Gosbec, Margery de, 20 Edward I. 
Hengham, John de, 29 Edward III. 
Hervy, John, of Milton, 31 Henry VI. 
Hevingham, Lady, 31 Henry VI. 
Holbrooke, Dame Joan de, 20 Edward III. 
Huryngham, John de, 40 Edward IIL 
Kelling, William, chaplain, 44 Edward III. 
Kerdeston, Cecily de, 9 Henry IV. 
Kydman, Richard, 15-16 Henry VIII. 
Lampet, Julian, 21 Henry VI. 
Leverich, Thomas, 44 Edward III. 



H 2 



48 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter III. 



Leverich, William, 44 Edward III. 

Lomnour for the soul of JohnTylney, 

44 Edward III. 
Lucy, Robert, chaplain, 26 Henry VI. 
Marker, Peter, 44 Edward III. 
Marlingford, John de, 12 Richard II. 
Methelwold, John de, 34 Edward III. 
Myntan, Richard, 9 Richard II. 
Nichol, John, 41 Edward III. 
Plover, William, widow of, 44 Edward III. 
Pygot, Agnes, 30 and 31 Henry VI. 

„ Anne, 26 Henry VI. 
Roger, rector of St. Julian's, 12 Richard II. 
Riddle, John, 44 Edward III. 
Smyth, John, of E 30 Henry VI. 



Spicer, Thomas, 9 Richard II. 
Stamford, Robert de, 26 Edward I. 
Suldham, John de, 19-20 Edward I. 
Toppes, Godfrey, 15-16 Henry VIII. 
Tounshend, Sir Roger atte, 42 Edward III. 
Tumor, John, chaplain, 21 Henry VI. 
UfTord, Robert de, Earl of Suffolk, 44 

Edward III. 
Ugser, John de, of Bernham, 27 Edward III. 
Walcot, Sir Walter, 41 Edward III. 
Winchester, Bishop of, 26 Henry VI. 
Wode, William, 26 and 31 Henry VI. 

„ William atte, 21 Henry VI. 
Wurthested, William de, 9 Richard II. 



The names of many of the boarders are preserved on the old rolls, and 
noted by Norris, from whose collections I have compiled the following — 



LIST OF BOARDERS. 



Agges, Catherine, 27 Henry VI. 

Alice niece of William Bateman, 

Bishop of Norwich, 19 Edward III. 

Alice 9 Henry IV. 

Alice 17 Henry VI. 

Amby, Isabel, 5 Henry V. 

Ancar, Joan, 32 Edward 111. 

Argentein, Isabell, and servant, 9 Richard II. 

Aslak, Dorothy, daughter of 

Pylkyngton, 18 Henry VII. 



Bacon, Thomas, 6 Henry VI. 

Bafyle (Bayfeld ?), Richard, 29 Henry VI. 

Balle, Catherine, 17 Henry VI. 

Barber, Isabell, 9 Henry VI. ; afterwards a 

nun of this house. 
Baret, Margaret, 2 Henry V. 
Bateman, William (Bishop of Norwich), 

niece of, 19 Edward III. 
Baxter, Julian, 9 Henry VI. 
Beatrice ... 9, 10, 13, 15, and 19 Richard II. 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter III. 



49 



Berdolf, the Lady Elizabeth, 24 Edward III. 

Bere, Catherine, 27 Henry VI. 

Bernard, John, 30 Henry VI. 

Bilney, Henry, 27 Henry VI. 

Blakene, William, a daughter of, 19 
Edward III. 

Blickling, the Lady Audelee, 20 Edward III. 
„ Catherine de, 2 Edward II. 
„ William de, a daughter of, 20 
Edward III. 

Blickling, Elizabeth, 31 Henry VI. 

Bokenham, Annabel, 29 Henry VI. 

Bracolee, Catherine, 9 Henry VI. Possibly 
a relation of Fria;- Brackley, the well- 
known Confessor of the Pastons. 

Brandon 20 Edward III. 

Bray, Eliza, 8 and 9 Henry IV. 

Brigham, Ada, 9 Henry IV. 
n Ada de, 2 Henry V. 

Briselee, Alice de, 44 and 45 Edward III. 

Browne, Margaret, 30 Henry VI. 
„ Richard, 30 Henry VI. 

Brygham, Ada, 6 and 9 Henry VI. 
„ Ada de, 5 Henry V. 

Bryst, Alice, 9 Henry VI. 

Bumstede, Beatrice de, 20 Edward III. 

Bumsted, Ralph de, a daughter of, 19 
Edward III. 

Buntyng, Sir Robert, 29 Henry VI. 

Cambryg, Alice, 17 Henry VI. 

Chamberleyn, Thomas. 10 Richard II. 

Cheselden, Alice de, 8 Henry IV. 

Cere, Robert, a daughter of, 15 Edward III. 

Qerk, Margaret, 10 Edward IV. 



Cole, Agnes, 26 Henry VI. 

Cothferth, Phillippa, 29 Henry VI. 

Couteshall, Cecily, 29 Edward III. 

Creyk, William, 26 Henry VI. 

Croffts, Elizabeth, 25, 26, 27, and 29 

Henry VI. 
Cross, Catherine atte, 12 Richard II. 

„ John atte, two daughters of, 12 
Richard II. 

,, Margaret atte, 12 Richard II. 
Dain, Cecily, 31 Henry VI. 
Dam, Thomas, 30 Henry VI. 
Daniel, John, 8 Henry IV. 
Davy, Margaret, 10 Edward IV. 
Depham, Matilda de, 2 Henry V. 
Drake, Joan, 9 and 10 Richard II. 

„ Nicholas, a daughter of, 9 and 10 
Richard II. 
Dykkys, John, 23 Henry VI. 
Edwards, Alice, 25 Henry VI. 
Elmham, Alice, 23 Henry VI. 
Elot, William, 9 Henry VI. 
Elyhys, Rosa, 19 Edward III. 
Elyngham, Margaret de, 29 Edward III. 
Elys, Alice, 25, 26, and 31 Henry VI. 

„ Joan, 41 and 42 Edward III. 

„ Margery, 32 Edward III. 

„ William, a daughter of, 40, 41, and 42 
Edward III. 
Erlham, Alice de, 44, 45, and 46 Edward III. 
Erlham, John de, a daughter of, 44 and 46 

Edward III. 
Fador, John, 10 Edward IV. 
Famham, Margaret de, 34 Edward III. 



50 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter III. 



Fastolf, Alexander, a daughter of, 15 

Edward III. 

Fastolf 20 Edward III. 

Ferrers, Ellen, 31 Henry VI. 

Filby, Alice, 9 Henry VI. 

Flynt, John, two daughters of, 20 Edward 

III. 
Foxley, Alice de, 27 and 29 Edward III. 
Frost, Catherine, 20 Edward III. 
Geest, Alice, 2 Henry V. 
Gloos, Cecily, 34 Edward III. 
Goodnape, Alice, 17 Henry VI. 
Groos, Cecilia, 2 Henry V. 
Gunmore, Cecily, 26 and 27 Henry VI. 
Halle, Elizabeth, 31 Henry VI. 
Halys, Margaret, 5 Henry V. 
Hauk, John, a daughter of, 9 Henry VI. 
Hedersele, Julian de, 9 and 11 Edward II. 

Afterwards a nun of this house. 
Helyis, John, a daughter of, 15 Edward III. 
Hemgrave, Sir Thomas, 5 Henry V. 
Heneghye, Helen de, 24 Edward III. 

„ John de, a daughter of, 24 

Edward III. 
Hewe, Catherine, 10 Edward IV. 

Heyham of Leystoff, 27 Henry VI. 

Hockwolde, Margaret de, 19 Richard II. 
Holveston, Catherine de, 19 Edward III. 

„ John de, a daughter of, 15 

and 19 Edward III. 
Holveston, Margery de, 15 Edward III. 
Hoste, Edward, 10 Edward IV. 
Howard, John, and wife, 31 Henry VI. 
Ingham. Isabel, 6 Henry VI. 



Inglose, Margaret, 7 Richard II. 

Inglose, the Lady, and daughter, 40 

Edward III. 

Isabel 8 Henry IV. 

Jenney, Margaret, 31 Henry VI. 
„ Thomas, 27 and 31 Henry VI. 

John ,9 Henry IV. 

John , chaplain to John Bernard, 30 

Henry VI. 
Joye, Cecily, 29 Henry VI. 
Kerdeston, Cecily, 10 Richard II. 

tt Sir Leonard, 10 Richard II. 

„ the Lady, and daughter, 9 and 10 

Richard II. 
Kerdeston, Lady Margaret and her woman, 

10 Richard II. 
Kerdeston, Sir Thomas de, a daughter of, 

8 Henry IV. 
Kerdeston, Tliomas de, 9 Richard II. 
Ketylstone, Sir Richard, 10 Edward IV. 
Kynge, Margaret, 10 Edward IV. 
Kyngeshagh, Margaret, 13 Richard II. 
Lamoeye, Eliza, 8 and 9 Henry IV. 
Lampet, George and son John, 30 Henry VI. 
Lethom, Elizabeth, 31 Henry VI. 
Leverich, Alice, 41 and 42 Edward III. 

„ William, a daughter of, 41 and 43 
Edward III. 
London, Joan, 10 Edward IV. 
Love, Henry, the wife of, 12 Richard II. 
Lovell, Agnes, 23 Henry VI. 
Lucham, Beatrice de, 13 Richard II. 
Lynge, William, 10 Edward IV. 
Machyn, Margaret, 30 Henry VI. 



Carrow Abbey: Chapter III. 



51 



Maloysel, the Lady and her servant, 46 

Edward III. 
Marshal, John, 5 Henry V. 
Mascal, John, and servant, 7 Richard II. 
H Margaret, 3, 5, and 7 Richard II. 
Massey, Margaret, 29 Henry VI. 
Matilda servant to the Lady 

Wetherby, 29 Henry VI. 
Mayhue, John, 25 Henry VI. 
Michfield (Mickelfield) Hamon de, a daughter 

of, 15 Edward III. 
Middilton, Matilda de, 19 Edward III. 
Middleton, Matilda, 20 Edward III. 
Monk, William, 23 Henry VI. 
Mowting, Thomas, 26 Henry VI. 
Mymet, Geffery, a daughter of, 20 Edward 

III. 
Norwich, Amy, 17 Henry VI. 
Norwold, Margaret and daughter, 27 Henry 

VI. 
Oldbarly, Agnes, 30 Henr)' VI. 
Ordeyner, Stephen, 29 Henry VI. 
Osborne, Sibill, 31 Henry V^I. 
Oxneye, Margaret, 19 Richard II. 

II William de, a daughter of, 19 

Richard II. 
Person, Margaret, 27 Henry VI. 
Plomere, John, 9 Henry IV. 
Pygot, Agnes, 25, 26, 27, 29, 30, and 31 

Henry VI. 
Pyromund, Peter, two daughters of, 11 

Edward II. 
Qweynterell, Richard, 10 Richard IV. 
Rafman, Joan, 5 Henry V. 



Ramyssey, Alice de, 32 Edward III. 
Redd, John de, a daughter of, 46 Edward III. 
Rede, John, two daughters of, 44 Edward III. 
Redeham, Joan de, 32 Edward III. 

Repond ,27 Edward III. 

Reson, Elizabeth, 9 Henry VI. 

Richard 17 Henry VI. 

Rose, Joan, 25 Henry VI. 

Rose, Thomas, the daughter of, 8 Henry IX. 

Saxlingham, Emma de, 10 Richard II. 

„ Margaret de, and sister, 10 

Richard II. 
Shakcrysc, Richard, 27 Henry VI. 
Shelton, Margaret, 31 Henry VI. 
Smyth, William, 27 Henry VI. 
Sparham, John de, two daughters of, 44 

Edward III. 
Spycer, Adam, a daughter of, 9 and 10 

Richard II. 
Spycer, Benedict,a daughter of, 10 Richard II. 

„ Margaret, 9 and 10 Richard II. 
Stans, Isabella, 27 Edward III. 
Stow, Matilda de, 34 Edward III. 
Sweket, John, 19 Richard II. 
Synger, William, 10 Edward IV. 
Terell, Joan, 25 Henry VI. 
Thomas .... 9, 13, 15, and 19 Richard II., 

8 Henry IV. 
Thorn, John, 27 Henry VI. 
Thome, Ann, 31 Henry VI. 
Thorp, Elianor de, 2 Henry V. 
Thurkyld, Catherine, 9 and 10 Richard II. 
Thurkyld, Robert, a daughter of, 9 and lo 

Richard II. 



..> 



r^ If 1^ ihTT 



52 



Carrow Abbey : Chapter III, 



Toftus, Joan, ii Edward II. 

Toppe, Alice, 17 Henry VI. 

Toppe (or Toppes), Amy, 17 Henry VI. 

Toppys, Alice and sister, 10 Edward IV. 

Tostyn, Mary, 40 Edward III. 

Ty, Margaret de, 27 Edward III. 

Tybenham, Agnes, 9 Henry VI. 

Tylney, Cecily, 5 Richard II. 

Tylney, Margaret de, 44 Edward III. 

Tylney, Mathew de, a daughter of, 44 

Edward III. 
Tylneye, John, 6 Henry VI. 

Tylys 9 Henry VI. 

Ussleth, Alice, 32 Edward III. 
Vyce, Margaret, 29 and 30 Henry VI. 
Wachesam, Elizabeth de, 19 and 20 Ed- 
ward III. 
Wachesam, Sir Robert de, a daughter of, 

19 and 20 Edward III. 
Walsyngham, Will., 29 Henry VI. 
Warmale, Julian, 15 Henry VI. 
Wederby, the Lady Margaret, 26 Henry VI. 
Welburn, Beatrice de, 27 and 32 Edward III. 
Wellisham, Sir Roger, two daughters of, 

5 Richard II. 
WeUitham, Agnes de, 40 Edward III. 
Wetherby, Alice, 9 Henry VI. 

„ Elizabeth, 17 Henry VI. 

„ Joan, 6 and 9 Henry VI. 

„ Lady Margaret, 27, 29, 30, and 

31 Henry VI. 



Wetherby, Thomas, two daughters of, 9 

Henry VI. 
White, Margaret, 19 Richard II. 
„ Oliver, 19 Richard II. 
„ Robert, 19 Richard II. 
White, Sir John, two daughters and a son 

of, 19 Richard II. 
William . . . chaplain to the Lady Wetherby, 

27 Henry VI. 
William .... chaplain to William Wode, 

26 Henry VI. 
Willoughby, Joan, 27 Henry VI. 
Wode, William, 25, 26, 27, 29, and 30 

Henry VI. 
Wode, William atte, 23 Henry VI. 
Wolcey, John, 26 Henry VI. 
Wolrych, Alice, 5 Henry V. 
Wr)'ght, William, and servants, 6 Henry VI. 
Wylton, Margaret, 5 Henry V. 

,, Margaret, and servant, 31 Henry VI. 
Wynt, [Wynter ?], Ann de, 8 Henry IV. 
„ Elizabeth, 19 Richard II. 
„ Joan, 2 Henry V. 
„ John, a daughter of, 19 Richard II. 
Wynter, Joan, 23 Henr)' VI. 

„ Margaret, 25, 26, 27, and 29 
Henry VI. 
Wyth, Sir Geffery, a daughter of, 20 

Edward III. 
Yaxley,* Elizabeth, 1530. 
Ymb, James, 27 Henry VI. 



• Her most interesting will and inventory (of which there are copies in the VEstrauj^t's Wiils^ 
p. 2084) has much about Carrow in it. 




APPENDIX I. 



(tmx^i-x n Cartulario be Camtot. 



Tanner MS. 342, f. 149. 



Ex Libro Monasterii Monialium de Carho in manibus Jo. Corbet, Bart.^ 

Fol. 2a. S. Rex, etc. Sciatis, etc., me dedisse &(c) et praeterea concedo eis et firmiter 
praecipio quod bene et in pace et libere et quiete teneant haec omnia praedicta et omnes res 
suas alias et teneduras et homines infra burgum et extra, etc. 

Fol. i8b. Sciant praesentes et futui quod ego, Agnes de Monte Caneisi, priorissa de 
Karhow, assensu et voluntate totius conventus nostri, concessimus, et hac prsesenti carta 
confirmavimus, pro nobis et successoribus nostris Galfrido Ridel et haeredibus suis liberam 
faldam per totum annum in villa de Wroxham, secundum quod pertinet ad liberum tenementum 
suum quod de nobis tenet in eadem villa, ita tamen quod non liceat eidem G(alfrido) nee 
haeredibus suis pasturam de Wroxham ultra quam pertinet ad dictum tenementum superaverare : 
quod si fecerit liceat nobis et successoribus nostris per captionem averorum suorum distringere, 
quousque dictam superaverationem amoverit, et arbitrio liberorum hominum curiae nostrae de 
Wrokesham nobis vel successoribus nostris competenter fuerit satisfactum. In cujus rei, etc. 
Fol. 149b. Haec sunt ecclesiae sanctae munimenta Mariae, 

Quae concementes sint in coelo gloriantes, 

Et defraudantes damnentur in igne cremantes. 

Karho Deo charum templum constat Monacharum. 
Anno Domini 1146 fundata est Domus Sanctae Mariae de Carhowe Anno Regis Stephani 
decimo per Seynam et Lescelinam, sorores moniales de hospitali Sanctae Mariae et Sancti 
Johannis, in Norwico, Anno Episcopatus Willelmi Turbe Norwici 2°. 

Ex Chartulario Monialium de Carho juxta Noruicum. 

Fol. 1 8b. Omnibus has literas visuris vel audituris Johannes de Hecham et Cecilia Rida 
salutem. Noveritis nos concessisse pro nobis et haeredibus nostris et pro hominibus nostris 



' Tanner also quotes (151, fo. 4) Charters (qy. a chartulary) of Carhow, penes Nath. Axtell, Arm. 



II 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



Ill 



Deo et Ecclesiae de Karhow et monialibus ibidem Deo scrvientibus, scilicet quod nos vel 
haeredes nostri vel attumati nostri et homines nostri veniemus ad summonitionem Priorissae 
de Karhow vel ballivi sui semel in anno ad plegium renovandum ad curiam praedictae Priorissae 
in Wroxham, ad faciendum in eadem curia quod jus dictaverit coram dicta Priorissa vel 
monialibus vel Ballivo suo secundum legem et consuetudinem regni et ad majorem securitatem 
fidem dedimus ad invicem. Et ad praedictam formam observandum obligamus nos sub poena 
centum solidorum renuntiantes omni exceptioni, cavillationi et omni juris remedio, et maxime 
regise prohibition^ In hujus testimonium sigilla nostra apposuimus. Testibus, Domino 
Bald'co de TanV etc. 

Noverint universi praesentes literas inspccturi vel audituri quod ego Harveus de Hecham 
de consensu Priorissae de Karhow, dominae de Wroxham, feci attumatos meos Alexandrum de 
Beston, vel Johannem de AUington, et eosdem attomavi in curia de Wroxham, a die Sancti 
Edmundi Regis et Martyris anno regni Regis Hcnrici filii Regis Johannis xxxviij" usque ad 
festum Sancti Michaelis proxime sequens, in omnibus placitis in dicta curia placitandis, ratificans 
quicquid per dictos Attumatos vel per eorum alterum actum fuerit in dicta curia sicut per me 
ipsum, ego autem teneor dictae Priorissae in xl solidis pro defectibus meis in dicta curia 
praehabitis, in quibus prius obligavi me eo quod remisit mihi centum solidos in quibus ei 
prius tenebar pro defectibus sequelae in curia alias praeteritis. In hujus testimonium 
praesentibus, etc. 

Pol. 19b. Sciant praesentes et futuri qund ego Johannes de Hecham, miles, filius Hervei de 

Hecham, concessi, dedi, et hac praesenti charta mea confirmavi Deo et Ecclesiae beatae Mariae 

de Karhow, Amabili de Ufford Priorissae, et ejusdem loci conventui in liberam, puram et perpetuam 

elemosinam totum manerium meum de Wroxham integre sicut illud tenui de praedictis Priorissa 

et Conventu cum omnibus tenementis et pertinentiis ad dictum manerium spectantibus 

in villis de Wrokesham, Racheya, Crostwic, Beston, Blifeud, Upton, Bastwicke, et Belaghe, ut 

in messuagiis, aedificiis, virgultis, gardinis, terris, pratis, pasturis, mariscis, turbariis, communiis, 

herbagiis, faldagiis, cum pascuis, haiis, sepibus, viis, semitis, aquis, fossatis, bruariis, chaciis, 

introitibus, exitibus, redditibus, homagiis, releviis, scutagiis,wardis,eschaetis, tam libere tenendum 

quam villanorum, villanis et eorum sequela cum eorum tenementis et catallis et cum eorum ser- 

vitiis, operibus, consuetudinibus, auxiliis, tallagiis, chevagiis alleg. fortunis et omnimodis dominiis, 

libertatibus, aisiamentis, profituis et pertinentiis ad dictum manerium quoquo modo spectantibus 

et pertinere debentibus et accidentibus. Habendum et tenendum praedictis Priorissae et 

Conventui et earum successoribus et earum ecclesiae antedictae libere, quiete, pure, pacifice, 

integre et honorifice, sine aliquo inde retenemento vel clamio seu aliqua calumnia ac contra- 

dictione mei vel haeredum meorum inperpetuum. Et ego praedictus Johannes et haeredes mei 

warrantisabimus et praedictis Priorissae ac Conventui et earum successoribus et earum 

ecclesiae antedictae totum manerium praenominatum cum suis pertinentiis in omnibus et per 

omnia prout supradictum est ut liberam puram et perpetuam eleemosinam. In cujus rei 

testimonium huic scripto sigillum meum apposui. Testibus, Dominis Thoma de Hakeford, 

Thoma Bardolfe, etc. 

Fol. 20a. Notum sit universis praesentibus et futuris quod ego Johannes de Hecham 
miles, filius Hervei de Hecham, pro salute animae meae et antecessorum et successorum meorum, 
concessi, reddidi, remisi et omnino quietum clamavi de me et de haeredibus meis inperpetuum 



Deo et Ecclesiae beatae Mariae de Karhow, Amabili de Ufford Priorissae, et ejusdem loci 
Conventui et earum successoribus et earum ecclesiae antedictae in liberam puram et perpetuam 
elemosinam totum manerium meum de Wrokesham integre sicuti illud tenui de eisdem 
Priorissa et Conventu cum omnibus tenementis et omnibus dominiis ad dictum manerium 
pertinentibus in villis de Wrokesham, Rachira, Crostweic, Beston, Bastwic, Upton, Blafeud, et 
Belagh, ut in messuagiis, aedificiis, terris, pratis, pasturis, mariscis, turbariis, aquis, fossatis, 
communiis, herbagiis, bruariis, haiis, sepibus, viis, semitis, faldagiis, pascuis, introitibus, exitibus, 
redditibus, homagiis, releviis, scutagiis, wardis et eschaetis tam liberorum quam villanorum villa- 
nis et eorum sequelis cum eorum tenementis et catallis et cum eorum servitiis, operibus ac 
consuetudinibus, auxiliis, talliagis, chevagiis, alleg. et fortunis, et cum omnimoda alia libertate 
proficuo et pertinentia ad dictum manerium spectantibus et pertinere debentibus. Habendum et 
tenendum praedictis religiosis et earum successoribus ac earum Ecclesiae antedictae libere, 
quiete, pure, pacifice, integre et honorifice, sine aliquo inde retenimento vel clamio seu aliqua 
calumnia aut contradictione mei vel haeredum meorum inperpetuum. Dedi etiam eisdem 
Priorissae et Conventui et earum successoribus totum tenementum et totum dominium cum 
suis pertinentiis, quod habui et tenui in dicto manerio de quibuscunque aliis dominis in dicta 
villa de Racheya et alibi. Habendum et tenendum de dominis feodi praedictis Religiosis et 
earum successoribus libere, quiete, pacifice et honorifice inperpetuum faciendo inde annuatim 
dominis feodi ser\itium debitum. In cujus rei testimonium sigillum meum apposui. Testibus, 
Domino Thoma de Hakeford, etc. 



APPENDIX II. 



FrOxM the Norris MSS. 



Gregorius, Episcopus, servus servorum Dei, dilectis in Christo filiabus priorissae et 
conventui de Carrowe, Norwicen. dioc, salutem et apostolicam benedictionem. Exposita 

nobis ex parte vestra petitio quod vos ad instantiam precum quorundam nobilium 

Angliae, quibus propter suam potentiam resistere non valeatis, tot jam recepisti in monasterio 
vestro moniales, quod vix potestis domus redditibus congrue sustentari. Quare auctoritate 
presentium vobis inhibemus, ut nullam recipiatis in gravamen monasterii vestri de caetero 
in monacham vel sororem, dat. Perusii xii kalend Septembris pontificatus nostri anno tercio.— 
(Ex autog. quondam Bib. Sim. D'Ewes.) 



^ -.. JU-ij 



liii^iiMtiii 



a«MHiifli^ 



-■^-r-^ 



IV 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices, 



APPENDIX III. 



Charter Rolls, 13TH Henry III., Mem. 12. 



Rex, Archiepiscopis, episcopis, etc., salutem. Sciatis nos, intuitu Deo, et pro salute animae 
nostrie et animarum antecessorum et hcereJum nostronim, dedisse, concessisse, et hac carta 
nostra confirmasse, Deo et ecclesiae sanctae Mariae de Kairo, et monialibus ibidem Deo 
servientibus, viginti quinque solidatas terrae in campis de Norwico cum prato ad terram illam 
pertinente, quas praedecessores nostri, reges Angliae tenuerunt, et terram illam in qua ecclesia 
sua de Kairo fundata est, habendas et tenendas, de nobis et heredibus nostri, sibi et succes- 
soribus suis, in liberam, puram, et perpetuam elemosynam. 

Quare volumus et firmiter praecipimus, quod praedictae moniales et earum successores, 
habeant et teneant praedictas viginti quinque solidatas terrae cum prato praedicto, sicut 
prsedictum est, et cum omnibus aliis rebus, et tennris, et hominibus suis, quas habeant infra 
burgum et extra, ita bene et in pace, libere, quieti et integre, sicut antecessores nostri, reges 
Angliae melius et liberius eas, in manibus suis tenuerunt, dum fuerant in manu sua. Test., 
J. Batthon, L. Dunelm, W. Karliol, episcopis ; Huberto de Burgh, Comite Kanciae, Justiciario 
Angliae, Stephano de Segrave, Nicholas de Moles, Hugone Dispenser, Bartholomeo Peche, 
Richardo filio Hugonis et aliis. Dat. per manum R. Cicestrensis episcopi apud Westmonaste- 
rium xiij die Februarii. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



versus Orientem et messuagium quod quondam fuit Adae Geggard et Roysae filiae Rogeri de 
Mundham, uxoris dicti Adae, versus Occidentem, et abuttat super terram Priorissae et 
Conventus de Carhowe versus Austrum, et super viam regiam versus Aquilonem ; Habendum 
et tenendum praedictis domino Rogero et Thomae et eorum haeredibus vel suis assignatis de 
domina Priorissa et Domo et Conventu de Carhowe per servitium sex denariorum et obeli 
praedictis Dominabus et Domui annuatim reddendorum, videlicet ad festum Sancti Michaelis 
tres denarios et obolum et ad Pascha tres denarios, pro omni servitio, consuetudine, secta, curia 
et exactione saeculari, et cui quibus aut quando dictum messuagium dare, vendere, vel assignare 
voluerint in quocunque statu fuerint libere, quiete, pacifice, integre et haereditarie sine aliquo 
inde retenemento, calumnia, clamio vel contradictione mei vel haeredum meorum vel alicujus ex 
parte mea in perpetuum. In cujus rei testimonium et securitatem huic praesenti cartae sigillum 
meum apposui. His testibus. Domino Nicholas de Kirkeby, clerico, Hugone de Bekkles, Alano 
de Baketon, Roberto Carpentario, Johanne de Brok, Galfrido Ryngolf, Roberto de Emehale, 
Thoma Vincent, et aliis. Datum apud Carhowe die Jovis in festo Sancti Dunstani, anno regni 
Regis Edwardi, filii regis H(enrici), vicesimo tertio. 



APPENDIX V. 



Register of the Prior and Convent of Norwich, p. 153 a 



t. 



APPENDIX IV. 



Douce Charters, 45 (Bodleian Library). 



Sciant praesentes et futuri quod ego, Radulphus filius Leciae de Emmesby, concessi, dedi et 
hac praesenti carta mea confirmavi domino Rogero de Stowe, capellano, et Thomae Finch, pro 
eorum servitiis et pro tresdecim solidis et quatuor denariis argenti, quos dederunt mihi in 
gersumam, totum illud messuagium cum aedificiis et omnibus suis pertinentiis, quod ego quondam 
habui ex dono et feoffamento Mathildis Skrike et Johannis filii dicUe Mathildis, et jacet in villa 
de Trows in vico qui vocatur Millegate inter messuagium quod fuit quondam Philippi Corel 



Prioresse de Univf has Iras visuris vt auditurf Agnes Priorissa de Karrowe et eiusd 

Karrowe 9ventus salm in dfio. Ad univ'so? noticiam volumg pvenire nos ecc'e 

See Trinitatf de Norw« & mochis ibid deo s'vientib3 remisisse et quiet 
damasse quiq3 ^d. et sol : \d. annul redditg in quibj nobis annuati tenebantur ex donacoe Reg. 
le Veyly ,p \s. et \d. in quib-j eis tenebamur annuatim ,p quadam terra qm dedit nobis Adam 
clericus quos solite ftiimg reddere annuatim Celerario de Norwic recognoscentes et [confi]tentes 
^ ad hue tenemur eisde de p'dca tra in xxiij*/. sol : ad ffm sci Mich'is eciam in iiijj. annualibus 
,p pastura de Lakenham de Elon's ad flfih Inuecois see crucf soluendf. In cuig rei testimoniu 
huic scpto sigill' capitti nri fecimus apponi. 



" 



VI 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



APPENDIX VI. 



Pat. 26th Henry VI., Part II., m. la 



Rex omnibus ad quos, &c. Inspcximus cartam domini S[tephani] quondam 
Regis Angliae factam in haec verba : — 

S[tephanus] Rex Angliae, Archiepiscopis, Episcopis, Abbatibus, Comitibus, Justitiariis, 
Baronibus, Vicecomitibus, Ministris et omnibus fidelibus suis, Francis et Anglis, totius Angliae 
salutem. Sciatis me dedisse et concessisse in perpetuam eleemosynam Deo et ecclesiae sanctae 
Mariae et Sancti Johannis de Norwico et monialibus meis ibidem Deo servientibus illam terram 
excultibilem quam habeo apud Norwicum in campis, videlicet xxv solidatas terrae et pratum ad 
terram illam adjacens ; et volo quod in ipsa terra fundent ecclesiam suam. Et praeterea 
concedo eis, et firmiter praecipio, quod bene, et in pace, et libere, et quiete teneant haec omnia 
praedicta et omnes res suas alias et teneduras* et homines infra burgum et extra de quocumque 
teneant, sicut unquam melius et honorificentius tenuerunt, et sicut ego ipse liberius terram 
praedictam tenui dum in manu mea esset, cum soca et saca, et toll,' et team, et infangenetheef, 
et cum omnibus libertatibus cum quibus ego ipse melius tenui. Et praeter hoc siquis eis aliquid 
contulerit beneficii, a Deo retributionem accipiet, et a me dignas gratias. Et prohibeo ne super 
hoc aliquis eis aliquam praesumat inferre molestiam. Testibus, Episcopo Sarum per Hugonem 
Big[od?J, et R. filio Ricardi apud Oxeneford. 

Inspexiraus etiam cartam Domini Henrici filii Regis Johannis, quondam Regis 
Angliae, de confirmatione similiter factam in haec verba : — 

Henricus Dei gratia Rex Angliae, Dominus Hibemiae, et Dux Aquitaniae, Archiepiscopis, 
Episcopis, Abbatibus, Prioribus, Comitibus, Baronibus, Justitiariis, Vicecomitibus, Praepositis, 
Ministris, et omnibus Ballivis et fidelibus suis, salutem. Inspeximus cartam quam Dominus 
Johannes, quondam Rex Angliae, pater noster, fecit Deo et ecclesiae sancta Mariae de Carhou 
et monialibus ibidem Deo servientibus in haec verba : — 

•• Johannes Dei gratia Rex Angliae, Dominus Hibemiae, Dux Normanniae, Aquitania, 
"et Comes Andegavi«, Archiepiscopis, Episcopis, Abbatibus, Comitibus, Baronibus, 
"Justitiariis, Vicecomitibus, Przepositis, Ministris, ac Ballivis et omnibus fidelibus suis, 
"salutem. Sciatis nos intuitu divini amoris et pro salute animae nostrx et animarum 



' See Ducange for this word, which seems to be equivalent to Unetura, 
' For talntlum, one of the many forms of thtlonium. 



Oi 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



vu 



"patris nostri Henrici et fratris nostri Ricardi Regum, et pro animabus omnium 
" antecessorum nostrorum, concessisse Deo et ecclesiae Sanctae Mariae de Carhow et 
"monialibus ibidem Deo servientibus feriam suam* de Carhou quatuor diebus duraturam, 
"vigilia scilicet nativitatis Beatae Mariae Virginis, et die nativitatis Beatae Mariae, et 
"duobus diebus proxime sequentibus, cum omnibus libertatibus, quas monachi'de 
" Nor%vico habent in feria sua in villa Norwici. Quare volumus et firmiter praecipimus, 
"quod feriam illam habeant et teneant inperpetuum bene et in pace, cum omnibus 
" libertatibus et liberis consuetudinibus ad liberas ferias pertinentibus. Et prohibemus 
"ne aliquis eis de feria sua molestiam faciat vel injuriam quamdiu ipsa duraverit. 
"Testibus, W. Londoniensi et H. Sarum Episcopis, G. filio Petri Comitis Essexia, 
"Willelmo Marescallo Comite de Penbroc, Hamel Comite de Warenna, Willelmo de 
"Breos, Hugone Bard[olph?], Stephano de Turneham, Willelmo de Boterell. Data 
"per manum H. Cantuariensis Archiepiscopi, Cancellarii nostri, apud Norhamptonam 
" ix die Junii regni nostri anno primo." 

Nos autem concessionem praedictam ratam habentes et gratam, earn pro nobis et 
haredibus nostris, quantum in nobis est concedimus et confirmamus sicut carta prjedicta 
rationabiliter testatur. His testibus, Roberto Aquillon, Ely a de Rabayne, Willelmo de 
Wyntreshull, Imbto de Monte Feranti, Stephano de Eddeworth, Willelmo Belet, Radulpho 
de Bakepuz, et aliis. Data per manum nostram apud Westmonasterium decimo die Junii 
anno regni nostri quinquagesimo sexto. 



Inspeximus insuper cartam domini Edwardi, quondam Regis Angliae, 
progenitoris nostri, similiter factam in haec verba : 

Edwardus, Dei gratia Rex Angliae, Dominus Hibemiae, et Dux Aquitaniae, Archiepiscopis, 
Episcopis, Abbatibus, Prioribus, Comitibus, Baronibus, Justitiariis, Vicecomitibus, Praepositis, 
Ministris, et omnibus Ballivis et fidelibus suis, salutem. Sciatis nos concessisse, et hac carta 
nostra confirmasse, dilectis nobis in Christo Priorissae de Carhowe et monialibus ejusdem loci, 
quod ipsa: et earum successores inperpetuum habeant liberam warennam in omnibus dominicis 
terris suis de Wroxham, Rakheythe, Crosthweyt, Bestone, Brakendele, Magna Melton, et 
Rokelund juxta Langele, in Comitatu Norfolciae, dum tamen terrae ills non sunt infra metas 
forestae nostrae, ita quod nullus intret terras illas ad fugandum in eis, vel ad aliquid capiendum, 
quod ad Warennam pertineat, sine licentia et voluntate ipsarum Priorissae et monialium, vel 
earum succcssorum. super forisfacturam nostram decem librarum. Quare volumus et firmiter 
pra.-cipimus pro nobis et haeredibus nostris, quod praedictae Priorissa et moniales et earum 
successores imperpetuum habeant liberam warennam in omnibus dominicis terris suis praedictis, 
dum tamcn terrae ilia: non sunt infra metas forestae nostrae, ita quod nullus intret terras illas ad 
fugandum in eis, vel ad aliquid capiendum, quod ad warennam pertineat, sine licentia et 
voluntate ipsamm Priorissae et monialium vel earum successorum, super forisfacturam nostram 
decem hbrarum sicut praedictam est. His testibus, venerabilibus patribus Johanne Wintoniensi, 



* Nostram? 




^mmm- 



VIU 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



IX 



Ricardo Hcreford.nsi, « Simon. Sarum EpUcopU, Johanne d. ^^'""""^J"™" ^„^;^' 
Guidone it Bello Campo Comite Warrenne, Johann. de Bntann, Hugone le D«pens« 
^ Cot UyWe, WaUero d. M>o Campo ^enescaHo Hosp.J,. nos.^^^^^^^^^ 
Brabazun. Johanne de Merk, et aliis. Dat. per manum nostram apud Red.ng ..ee«mo 
die Novembris anno regni nostri tricesimo primo. 

Inspeximus ulterius literas patentes Domini Ricardi, nuper Regis Angli*. 
secundi post conqu=Bstum. de confirmatMne similiter factas m h^c verba :- 

Ricardus Dei gratia Rex Angli* et Francis et Dominus Hibemi^, omnibus ad quo, 
pr«"e;.;e,^enerin.sa.u,em. Inspeximus canam Domini Hennc, quondam Reg,, 
Andia, progenitoris nostri, m hicc verba :— ... 

Henrieus Dei gratia Rex Anglic. Dominus Hibemia., Dux Normanma, Aqu,tan«. 
e. Come" AndeV^i-. Archiepiscopis, Episeopis, Abba.ibus. Pnor,bus, Commbus 
LonTu' JustitLis, Vicecomitibus, Prxpositis, Ministris, et omn.bus Balhv.s, « 
MrbuTsuissIlm. Sciatis nos, intuitu Dei et pro salute anim;e nostra e, ammarum 

rr -e.orum et ^^^^^^ rstrrctrrro^ 
fb^rr::- rs:Tor;:dr:onr e, earum —.s imp.^.uum 

IxTnt .t teneant omnes terras possessiones et eleemosynas suas cum soka et saka. 
.tone r T:lZT..^^r.J.^.^ ^ ^n. omnibus libertatibus et Hbens con- 
utudinibus et quietantiis suis, in bosco et piano, ^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

::^rrb:^:~--^^ 

ri rs tis^^^^ et hundredorum. et placitis. et .uerelis et de pecun.a danda pro 

?oTsfo tu o de murdro, et de scutagio. et geldo et danegeldo, et h.dag.o et ass.s.s. et de 

op"bus castellorum, et parcorum. et pont.um, et -»<=---' ^^ ^^ ^^^fj^";,^ 

Zltl^ et flemenefrith, et de hamsokne, et de wardpeny, et de averpeny. et de blod«.te. 

^^^^^^^l^^^ et de hundredpeny. et de thithmgpeny. ita quod v.sus 

Lncip e.°i fi ; in curia ipsarum moniaUum coram ser^.ente nostro ad hoc vocato s. ven.e 

vTerit sin autem venire noluerit. non ideo remaneat. Sunt et.am ,psae momales qu ctce 

;rL.rram nostram de tbe^one. -:^r7:m m^ ^i^ ^^^^ 

omni s^culari ser^mo et opere ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ „. Eliensi Episcopo, H. 

SCci:;:^:K-t.orcr N;r.^ W^e -ke^an. De.. W. 

Martini Londonia., Godefrido de Crancumb, Radulpho Gun, ..maur de Sancto Amando 

Wmehno de Piche orde. Bartholom^o de Sankevill. et aliis. Dat. per manum venerab.hs 

Willelmoaericneio . p^.^n^ii nostri, apud Sanctum Edmundum, xix die 

patris R. Cicestrensis Episcopi, Canceliaru nosin, apuu 

Martis anno regni nostri decimo nono. 



» Flet-u'iUi 



• Lerwite. 



Nos autem concessiones et confirmationes prajdictas et omnia alia in dicta carta contenta 
rata habentes et grata, ea pro nobis et ha^redibus nostris, quantum in nobis est, Priorissae et 
Conventui loci praedicti et successoribus suis concedimus et confirmamus, sicut carta prsdicta 
rationabiliter testatur. et prout esdem Priorissa et Conventus et pr^edecessores suae libertatibus 
et quietantiis pra^dictis hactenus rationabiliter usae sunt et gaviss. In cujus rei testimonium 
has hteras nostras fieri fecimus patentes. Teste Meipso apud Westmonasterium vicesimo die 
Maii anno regni nostri primo. 

Nos autem pias et laudabiles intentiones dictorum inclytorum progenitorum 
nostrorum intime ponderantes, ac ad reverentiam et honorem pr^celsjE Dei 
genitricis ac gloriosissimae Virginis Mariae et Sancti Johannis dictam ecclesiam 
cum suis juribus libertatibus et pertinentiis universis illaesam observare volentes, 
omnes et singulas cartas et litcras praedictas, necnon omnia et singula in eisdem' 
cartis et literis contenta, rata habentes et grata, ea pro nobis heredibus et 
successoribus nostris, quantum in nobis est, acceptamus, approbamus, et 
Margaretae nunc Priorissae de Carhou et ejusdem loci sive ecclesis conventui 
et successoribus suis ratificamus, concedimus, et confirmamus, prout cartae et 
literae praedictae rationabiliter testantur. Praeterea volentes eisdem nunc 
Priorissae et Conventui ac successoribus suis gratiam in hac parte facere 
uberiorem, de gratia nostra speciali concessimus pro nobis haeredibus et 
successoribus nostris praedictis, quantum in nobis est, eisdem nunc Priorissae 
et Conventui et successoribus suis quod licet ipsae vel praedecessores suse aliqua 
vel aliquibus franchesiarum, libertatum, privilegiorum, consuetudinum, immuni- 
tatum, allocationum, et quietantiarum in dictis cartis et literis contentorum 
aliquo casu emergente hactenus plene usae non fuerint vel abusa, aut earum 
aliqua plene usa non fuerit vel abusa, esedem tamen nunc Priorissa et Conventus 
ac successores suae franchesiis, libertatibus, privilegiis, consuetudinibus, immuni- 
tatibus, allocationibus, et quietantiis illis, et eorum quolibet, de csetero plene 
gaudeant et utantur, sine occasione vel impedimento nostri vel haeredum 
nostrorum, justitiariorum, escaetorum, vicecomitum, coronatorum, aut aliorum 
ballivorum, scu ministrorum nostrorum haeredum, vel successorum nostrorum 
quorumcunque. Et ulterius ne propter obscuritatem seu generalitatem literarum, 
verborum vel terminorum, in cartis et literis praedictis, vel earum aliqua conten- 
torum, vel quamcunque aliam causam vel occasionem in concessionibus, confirma- 
tionibus, cartis vel literis dictorum progenitorum nostrorum aut alicujus eorum, aut 
in aliquo in eisdem vel earum aliqua contentorum, seu in allocationibus super 
eisdem et in earum usu habitis, sive facta materia quaestionis vel dubii imposterum 
possit generari, sed ut omnis ambiguitas et controversia quae in eisdem aut earum 



X 



Carrow Abbey: Appetidices. 



aliqua moveri posset tollatur penitus et submoveatur, ex abundant! gratia nostra 
concedimus per praesentes pro nobis, haeredibus, et successoribus nostris praefatis 
nunc Priorissae et Conventui et successoribus suis praedictis omnia et singula 
libertates, franchesias, privilegia, consuetudines, allocantias,' quietantias et 
immunitates, quibus eaedem Priorissa et Conventus aut praedecessores suae 
vigore, colore, seu praetextu quorumcunque generalium seu obscurorum literarum 
verborum vel terminarum in cartis et literis praedictis vel earum aliqua 
contentorum ante haec tempora usae et gavisae fuerunt, vel earum aliqaa usa vel 
gavisa sint quovis modo. Et quod eaedem Priorissa et Conventus et successores 
suje praedictae eisdem omnibus et singulis libertatibus, franchesiis, privilegiis, 
consuetudinibus, allocationibus, quietantiis, et immunitatibus, absque aliqua 
speciali declaratione sive interpretatione earundem, de caetero plene, integre, et 
quiete gaudeant et utantur, et adeo plene et integre ; ac si nos (seu aliquis 
progenitorum vel prsedecessorum nostrorum) libertates, franchesias, privilegia, 
consuetudines, allocationes, quietantias, et immunitates ilia praefatis nunc 
Priorissae et Conventui et successoribus suis praedictis vel alicui praedecessorum 
suorum per verba specialia concessimus, vel ea specialiter interpretati fuissemus, 
necnon adeo plene, integre, et quiete, prout eaedem Priorissa et Conventus et 
praedecessores suae praedictae libertatibus, franchesiis, privilegiis, quietantiis, 
consuetudinibus, allocationibus, et immunitatibus illis et eorum quolibet, vel 
aliquo eorundem, colore vel praetextu generalium vel obscurorum literarum, 
verborum, vel terminorum praedictorum aliquo tempore praeterito usae fuerunt 
et gavisae, vel earum aliqua usa est et gavisa, absque impedimento, perturbatione, 
molestatione, sive impetitione nostri, haeredum vel successorum nostrorum, 
justitiariorum, escaetorum, vicecomitum, coronatorum, aut aliorum ballivorum 
seu ministrorum nostrorum, heredum vel successorum nostrorum, quorumcunque, 
aliquo statuto, actu, ordinatione, restrictione, mandato incontrarium cdito, 
proviso, ordinato, sive dato, vel alia re, causa, seu materia quacumque non 
obstante. In cujus, etc. Teste Rege apud Westmonasterium ix die Julii. 

Per breve de privato sigillo et de dat. praedict, etc. Et pro Deo et pauperes 
et pro viginti solidis solutis in hanaperio. 



^ Sic, for allocationes. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices, 



XI 



APPENDIX VII. 



Originalia, 30TH Henry VIII. 



Rex secundo die Novembris concessit Johanni Shelton militi scitum et precinctum nuper 
monasterii sive prioratus Carroue ac manerium de Carroue in com. civit. Norwic. necnon 
rectorias ecclesiarum de Estwynche, Stow Bardolf, Erlham, et Wrenyngham in com. Norff. 
necnon advocationes, &c., sancti Edwardi, sanctae Julianae, et Omnium Sanctorum, ac capellae 
sanctae Katherinae in dicta civitate, ac advoc. vicariae de Erleham in dicto com. Norff. necnon 
omnia maneria, &c., de Brakendell, Trowes, Amerj'nghall, Rokland, Helston, Porland, 
Kyrkeby, Bramarton, Saxlyngham, Bemham, Rednall, Thurlton, Wrenyngham, Dereham, 
Skernyng, Stow Bardolf, Lakenham, Hayleston, Melton, Thetford, Estwinche, Erlham, 
Swardeston, Halvergate, et alibi in dicto com. Norff. ac in Cheston, Pakenham, Thurston, 
Southelraeton, et alibi in com. Suff. dicto nuper prioratui spectan. habend. ei et haeredibus suis 
imperpetuum.—Ro. xxxv. 



APPENDIX VIII. 



Norwich City Records. 



M* that in the ffest of Saynt Mary Magdalen in the xxxiiij yeer off the reign off o" Souaign 
lord Kyng Henry the viij**" m VVillim Rogers, mayer off the Citie off Norwich, Robt. Leche, 
Thomas Pikrell, E. Rede, Austen Styward, Nicholas Sywhat, Robt. Rug, & E. Woode, Alder. 
of the same Citie, m s'jaunt Townesend, m Corbet, & m Warde, Toun Clerk, counsellors of the 
same citie, m John Shelton, Esquyer, & Humffrey Wyngffeld, knyght, m Gosnold, m Gaudy, & 
m Yelu'ton, Counsellers off the same mast Shelton, mette all togeder at the Newe hall wMn the 
seid Citie by agrement beffore taken bitwen m maier & others ffor & in the name of the Coialtie 
of the seid Citie & the seid master Shelton on the other ptie to comon & treate off m vpon 
certen iurisdiccon, p'uilegiez, &c., which the seid maier Citzens & Coialtie of the seid Citie 
claymed to haue within the p'ory off Carrowe & Trousemilgate as pceli of the countie of the 



xu 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



seid Citie, which Jurysdiccon, puilegiez, &c., the seid mast Shelton denyed affermyng that 
Carrowe et Trouse milgate to be w»in the Countie of Norflf. & noon pte of the Countie off the 
Citie off Nonviche, &c., vpon whiche mat beyng thus in contencon the said m maier & alder- 
men & Councell of the seid Citie for the pffe of ther seid dayme shewed vnto the seid mast 
Shelton & his Councell certen Recordf remajTieng w» the seid mayer & coialtie conc'nyng as 
well the foundacon off the seid late p'orye as also ther Jurysdiccon, p'uylege, &c., ther peasibly 
had, &c.. vpon whiche evydence ther so shewed the seid in Shelton & his counsell aft delibacon 
sea'ally by them selff had desyred of the seid meyer a respette till the next Sessions that in the 
meane tyme thei myght see the euydence of the seid m Shelton & than to make aunswer, &c., 
wherunto the seid m maier, &c., agreed, &c. And therupon it was agreed that the Constables 
of the seid Trouse millegate & other thenhabetaunts ther & at Carrowe in the meane tyme 
shuld be attendant at the commaundement of m mayer & sheriffes as thei haue ben herunto 
before, &c., notwithstandyng aft that in Shelton caused diu's of thenhibitunts of Trouse 
millegatte to muster before hym at Shelton halle oute of the seid libties & ther receyued & 
p'sted them & aft sende a comandement to the constablez ther to wame the seid psons to be 
redy w«in one owres warneng to be attendunt vpon hym to do y« kyngs maiestye s'uice, &c., 
which mandat' the seid constablez brought to mast' mayer on the eve of the Natyuytie of o* 
ladye, &c., which mandat' the seid mast' mayer deleyned & wuld not suffer the seid constables 
to execute it at the co'mandement of the seid in Shelton but comanded the seid constables in 
his name to wame the seid psons which had receyued p'ste of the seid in Shelton to be redy, 
&c. accordyng to ther prest, &c. Atte whiche Sessions the seid master Shelton made nou 
Answer but lefte his clayme & demand in the same, &c 

Conuocacio Alder, videlicet magri Will'i Rogers maioris, Ede Grey, Robt. Leche, Thoihs 
Pykerell, E. Rede, Austen Styward, Nich'i Sywhat, Amborf vie', Thom Necton, Hamois L>'nsted, 
Rici Catlyn, Ade Lawes, & ffelicis Pottok, die veneris penultimo die Marcij A» rr. henr. viij. 

xxxiiij. 

This daye Nicholas Trigat' & John Bonde s'unts to the lady Shelton cam psonally before 
the seid maier & alder, in thys sam p'sent courte & declared to the seid maier & aldermen that 
oone Gouell somtyme s'unt in the late p'ory of Carrowe hath shewed to her that her flfermers of 
her londs abbuttyng vpon a comon wey called grene gateway were the walls of the citie hath 
enchroched w* ther ploughes pte of the same comon wey, &c., which encrochement she is 
contentid that by the view of the seid meyer, &c., shall be reformed, &c., trustyng that iff eny 
Injury hath ben comytted to her by like encrochement upon eny of hir londs by eny of the seid 
Citizens that then the seid maier, &c., will likewise see redresse therof & therupon it is agreed 
that as well the seid maier as the same lady at ij of the clok of thf p'sent day aft'non shall mete 
togeder at the seid comon wey to order the p'mysses accordyngly. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



Xlll 



APPENDIX IX. 



Extracts from Wills relating to Carrow. 



Walter de Calthorpe, alias Suffield, Bishop of Norwich, by will dated 1256, gave to the 
nuns of Carhe 5 marks. — Blomefield, ii. p. 347. 

Thomas de Trows, citizen of Norwich, by his will dated 1371, gave to the prioress and 
convent of Carhowe half a marV.— Register Haydon, f. 19, 20. 

William Plomer, citizen of Norwich, by his will proved 1373, gave to the prioress and 
nuns at Carhowe \os.—Ib., f. 28 a. 

John de Bemey, by his will proved 1374, gave to the nuns at Carhowe ^os.—Ib., f. 42. 

Thomas Veriey of Norwich, son of Roger \'eriey and Margaret his wife, gave to the nuns 
at Carhowe ^10; to each of his sisters, probably Catherine and Mary, both nuns of this house, 
£5. His will was proved A.D. 1380.— /J., f. 179. 

Walter de Bemey, by his will proved A.D. 1370, gave to the nuns at Carhowe ^5.— 
Ib.f f. 207. 

Thomas Qwhytyng of Spertyshall, Rector of St. Edmund and St. Julian in Norwich, by 
his will proved 1379, gave to the prioress of Carhowe los.—Ib., f. 168 a. 

Sir Roger de Wylasham, Knight, by his will proved 1381, gave to the prioress of Carhowe 
6s. Zd. ; to every nun professed y. \d. ; to every nun not professed zs.—Ib., f. 211 a. 

Roger, Vicar of Suriingham, by his will proved 1381, gave to the prioress and convent at 
Carhowe 2cw. — lb., f. 196. 

Nicholas Downe or Donne, citizen of Norwich, by his will proved May 2nd, 1388, directed 
his body to be buried in the church of St. Mary, Carhowe, and gave to the high altar there 
6j. Zd. ; to the repair of the church 6j. Id. ; and to every nun professed Aod.— Register 
Harsyke, f. 96 a. 

William, Rector of Intewode, by his will dated 1389, gave to every nun of this house 
I2d.—lb., f. 107 b. 

Ralph Chirchman of Nekton, clerk, and citizen of Norwich, by his will dated 1391, 
gave to the prioress and nuns at Carhowe bs. 8d., and to every nun there 3s. Ad.— lb 
f. 153 b. 

William Dancastre, chaplain, by his will proved 1408, directed to be buried in the church 
of the nuns at Carhowe, if he died there.—/*., f. 340 a. 

John Danyell, citizen of Norwich, by his will proved 1418, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 
4ar. — Register Hyrnyng, f. 32. 

Joan, relict of William Eton, late citizen of Norwich, by her will proved 1419, gave to the 
convent at Carhowe 2cxr., and 20s. more to be divided among the nuns.—/*., f. 50 a. 



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Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



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Elizabeth, relict of Sir William Elmham, Knight, by her will proved 1419. gave to the nuns 
at Carrowe ^os.— Register Hymyng, f. 58 a. , j 

John Bainzet (? Banzet) of Mylham, by his wiU dated at Carhowe 1420, and proved 1421, 
gave to the repair of the church of St. Mary at Carhowe ^od.—Ib., f. 93 a. 

John Erlham, merchant and citizen of Norwich, by his wiU proved 1423. gave to the nuns 

at Carhowe 20s.— Jb., f. 109 b. .„ ^ ^ . .u« 

John Ryche, parson of St. Michael's of Coslany. by his wiH proved 1426. gave to the 

anchoress at Carhowe 2oii.—Ib., 151 b. , u- u 

William Elsham, rector of Swanton Novers, by his wiU proved 1426, gave to the high 

altar of Carhowe \2,i.— Register Surflete, f. 2 a. 

Thomas Sustede, by his will proved 1428. gave to the nuns at Carhowe 3^- 4^:-/*-. 

Robert Baxter, citizen of Norwich, by his will proved 1432. gave to the anchoress at 
Carhowe 20s. ; to the convent 20s. ; to the nuns, to be divided amongst them, d,os.-Ib., 

f. 86 a. t. T J 1 r 

William Seteman, citizen of Nor%vich. by his will proved 1433. gave to the Lady Julian 
(Lampyt), anchoress at Carhowe, zos. ; to every servant of the said lady 4<v/-; to every nun 

25.— lb., f. 124 b. ^ v * V . 

Richard Schyrlok of Badlee, by his will proved 1434, gave to the anchoress at Karowe 
ys. ^. ; to each of her two servants \2d.—Jb., f. 163 a. 

Henry Boole, chaplain, by his will proved 1435, gave to every nun at Carhowe \2d. ; to the 
anchoress there \2d. ; to Margaret her servant I2d.—Ib., f. 193 b. 

Roger Comwayle, citizen of Norwich, by his will proved 1438, gave to the nuns at 
Carhowe, to be divided amongst them, bs. ^d.— Register Doke, f. 63 a. 

William Baxtere, chaplain, by his will proved 1438, to be buried in the chapel of St. John 
the Evangelist, on the south side of the church of St. Mary at Carhowe, and gave to the 
prioress 6.. &/. ; to every nun 2od.', to the Lady Alice Parys 2od. ; to every servant of 
the said house ^.—Ib., f. 86 a. 

John Dowes, late parson of Cantele, by his will dated I439, to be buried in the chapel of 
St. John Baptist at Carhowe. and gave to the high altar of St. Mary there ts. Zd. ; to the 
anchoress y. 4^/. ; further, he willed that his executors should repair the said chapel of St. 
John Baptist, out of his goods, if it could be done consistently with his other legacies.—/*., 

f. 90 b. 

Joan Colman of Worsted, by her will proved 1439, gave one moiety of her goods to be 
divided equally between the Lady Julian Lampyt (anchoress at Carhowe), the Lady Joan 
(anchoress in Consford), Elizabeth Baret. and Joan Bam.—/*., f. 112 b. 

William Fen, citizen of Norwich, by his wiU proved 1440, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 

ly. ^—Ib., f. 138 b. 

Robert Staynton, rector of St. Edward and St. Julian in Norwich, by his will proved 1440. 

gave to the nuns at Carhowe 6j. %d. — /*., f. 144 a. 

John Caimbrigge, citizen and alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1442, gave to the 
anchoress at Carhowe ts. %d. ; to each of her maidens 2od, ; to the prioress Afid. ; to every 
nun 2(x/. — /*., f. 192 a. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



XV 



Simon Thurton, by his will proved 1443, gave to the nuns here 6j. Zd.~ Register Doke, 
f. 223 b. 

Robert Norwych, by his will proved 1443, gave to Julian, the anchoress at Carhowe, zod.— 
lb., f. 5 a. 

William Woderove of Trowse, by his will proved 1443, directed his body to be buried in 
the church of St. James at Carhowe, on the south side of the ioT\\..~ Register Surflete, 
f. 2 1 1 b. 

Simon Wade, chaplain, by his will dated and proved 1419, to be buried in the parish 
church of St. James in Carhowe, and gave to the high altar of the said church bs. 8d. ; to the 
parochial chaplain of the said church i2d. ; to the clerk Sd. ; he also gave to the said church 
a vestment. — Register Hyrnyng, f. 49 a. 

Thomas Wetherby, Esq., by his will proved 1445, gave to the high altar of the church of 
Sl James at Carhowe 20s. — Register Wylbey, f. 30 a. 

The Lady Margaret Wylton, late of Carhowe, died intestate. Administration granted 30 
March, 1459 (dne Margarete Wylton, nuper de Qzix\\Q^e).— Register Brosyard, Part I., f. 13 a. 

John Brosyard, citizen of Norwich, merchant, by his will proved 1455, gave to the nuns 
at Carhowe loj. ; to the Lady Julian, anchoress there, her servants y. ^. ; to the Lady Alice 
Par>'is at Carhowe, %d. — lb., f. i a. 

John Intewode, by his will proved 1457, gave to the nuns of Carhowe 6s. Zd.—Ib , 
f. 41 b. 

Thomas Spreggy, mercer, by his will proved 1457, gave to the nuns of Carhowe y. 4d.— 
lb., f. 54 a. 

Katherine Brasyer, widow, by her will proved 1457, gave to the prioress of Carhowe izd., to 
ever>' nun there except Isabell Barbour 4//. ; to the said Isabell zr. ; to the Lady Julian Lampet, 
anchoress there, 6s. Zti. ; to her servants 2d.: to Alice Parys at Carhowe I2d.—Ib., f. 58 a. 

John Kempe of Erlham, by his will proved 1456, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 7 marks.— 
lb., fo. 70 b. 

William Asshwell, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1457, gave to the anchoress at 
Carhowe y. 4^. —lb., f. 78 a. 

Margaret Wcthyrby, late wife of Thomas Wethyrby, Esq., by her will proved 1458, gave to 
the prioress of Carhowe y. \d. ; to every nun there 2od. ; to the anchoress there her mantle 
furred with fitchewys ; to the Lady Alice Wethyrby her daughter, a nun at Carhowe, 10 marks ; 
and made the said Alice and Alice Pygott, prioress of Carhowe, with others, executors.— 
Ib.y i. 83 a. 

John Harrowe, alias John Wyghton, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1457, gave to 
the convent at Carhowe 6s. Sd. ; to Isabell Barbour, a nun there, 6s. Zd.—Ib., f . 80 a. 

Katherine Marchale, by her will proved 1458, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 6s. Zd.—Ib., 
f. 99 a. 

Richard Lombe, Rector of St. Julian's in Norwich, by his will proved 1458, gave to the sacrist 
at Carhowe 6j. Zd. — lb., f. 108 a. 

John Ode of Norwich, by his will proved 1458, gave to the anchoress at Carhowe izd. ; to 
the convent there dr. Zd.—Ib., f. 135 a. 

John Goodw>n, chaplain, by his will, proved 1459, gave to the repair of the church of the 



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Car row Abbey: Appendices. 



Car row Abbey: Appendices. 



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nunsatCarhowe 3^.4^.; to the prioress there ^^d,^ to I^bell «f ^^'^ """Jj^^^^^^^^^^ 
Joar* Lyghtfoot, a nun there. 6^.; to Alice Wylby W. ; to Beatrice Kyng of the said house 4^. . 
to every other sister professed yi.-Register Brosyard, f. 146 a. ^ , . . « 

Isabell Colman, widow, by her will proved 1459, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 2od.-It., 

'' 'lotn Penny^g, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1459, gave to the nuns at 
Carhowe, to be equally divided among them. icx.. ; to Joan Spaldmg, a nun there. 3^. 4^.-/*.. 

^' '^Robert Aleyn. alderman of Norwich, by his will proved I459, gave to the prioress and 
nuns at Carhowe 20s. ; to Dame Julian Lampett. a recluse there, 6.. &/.-/*.. f. 1 56 b. 

Thomas Welan, barber, by his will proved I459, gave to Isabell h.s daughter, a nun at 

Carhowe, 10 marks.—/*., 159 b- , . j « ^«» ^r 

John Attilburgh, chaplain, by his will proved 1459. gave to the pnoress and convent of 

Carhowe bs. Zd. ; to the anchoress there izd.—Ib., f. 171 b. 

John Farwele, by his wiU proved 1459, gave to Agnes Kyng. a nun at Carhowe, y. 4^— 

^*" ThlY^ady Catherine Felbrigg. by her will proved 1460, gave 10//. to be divided among 
the nuns of Carhowe and eight other nunneries in Norfolk and Suffolk.-/*., f. 185 a. 

Joan Barbour, by her will proved 1460. gave divers legacies to »^<^^^f "g*;;^^\^^" 
Barbour, a nun at Carhowe ; made her said daughter executrix by the name of IsabeU Welan.- 

^*"' Mllr'wiUiam Sekyngton. by his will proved 1460, gave to the convent at Carhowe 

IV. Ad. — /*.. f. 226 a. , ^ 

Thomas Warner alias Bokenham of Norwich, by his will proved 1461, gave to the convent 

at Carhowe 6s. Zd.—Ib., f. 250 b. . c ^ .« »»,• 

Thomas Folcard, Rector of Heygham by Norwich, by his w.ll proved 1461. gave to the 
prioress of Carhowe and to every nun there 4^. ; to Margery Folcard his sister, a nun there. 
6j. Zd., a cup of amber, and other things.—/*., f. 252 a. 

Beatrix Balle. widow, by her will proved 1466, gave to the pnoress of Carhowe 2s. , to 
every other nun there \2d.—Ib., f. 273 b. , . » 

William Brampston, citizen of Norwich, gave, by his will proved 1462. to the anchoress at 
Carhowe 12^.; toeachofher servants 4^.-/*., f. 292 a. ^ , . . . u» 

John Bertram of Saxlingham, Gent., by his will dated .462, gave to Elizabeth his daughter 
a nun at Carhowe. 40.. per annum for her life, payable out of his manor of Saxlmgham which 
manor he gave to Thomas his son in tail male, and for default of such issue to be sold, and 
one-fourth part of the money arising from such sale he gave to the convent of Carhowe.- 

^*"' Stephe^n Multon. citizen of Norwich, grocer, by his will proved 1463, gave to the prioress 
of Carhowe 12^.; to every other nun there 4^. ; to the anchoress there I2rf.-/*., f- 315 a. 

Katherine. widow of William Goodered. late one of the king's judges, by her will dated 
,450 and proved 1464, gave to the Lady Julian Lampet of Carhowe xys. ^.-Ib. f. 330 b. 

Agnes, wife of Godefrid Joye, alderman of Norwich, by her will proved 1464, gave to the 
prioress of Carhowe 2od. j to the anchoress 2od. ; to every other nun there I2d.^/b., f. 332 »• 



John Folcard, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1464, gave to every nun of the 
house of St. Mary at Carhow ic3d. ; to Margery Folcard his daughter, a nun there, 4od.— 
Register Brosyard, f. 350 a. 

John Hunworth, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1465, gave to the anchoress at 
Carhowe Zd. ; to the prioress of Carhowe i2d. ; to every other nun there. A,d.—Ib., 
f. 331 b. 

Matilda Wilbey, relict of John Wylbey, senr., alderman of Nonvich, and formerly wife of 
John de Dunston, merchant and citizen of Norwich, by her will dated and proved 1444, gave 
to the nuns at Carhowe zod.—Ri'gisUr IVylbey, f. 13 a. 

William Jay of Northcrek, by his will dated and proved 1445. gave to the nuns of Carhowe 
2od.—Jb., f. 28 a. 

Thomas Wctherby, Esq., gave to the church of St. Mary at Carhowe 40J. ; to the Lady 
Alice War>n. prioress of the said church, 40//. ; to the Lady Alice Wetherby, his daughter, a nun 
there, 2Qs. per annum for her life ; to the Lady Alice Paryssh 40^, ; to the Lady Julian Lampet. 
anchoress there, 6s. Zd., by his will, proved 1445 and dated 1444.—/*., f. 30 a. 

Robert Pert, senr, citizen of Norwich, by his will proved 19 November, 1445. gave to the 
anchoress at Carhowe is.; to ditto at St. Julian's is.; to every nun at Carhowe is.; to the 
Lady Joan Spalding, a nun there, ijj. 4//.—/*., f. 58 a. 

Thomas Balle. citizen of Norwich, by his will dated 1446, gave to the anchoress at 
Carhowe 2s. ; to the prioress there 40^. ; to ever>- nun t'lcre Zd.—Ib., f. 78 b. 

Baldon Cratyng, chaplain of Eye, by his will dated and proved 1446, gave to the fabric at 
Carhowe 5 marks; to every nun there 6s. Zd.; to the anchoress there 6s. Zd.—/.'\, f. 126 a. 

The Lady Bardolf, by her will proved 1447, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 5 luarks; to the 
Lady Julian Lampet, anchoress there, 10 marks upon certain conditions.—/*., f. 133 a. 

The Lady Isabel Moriey died a.d. 1466, and gave a legacy to Dame Julian, anchoress 
there. 

William Lyhart, Bishop of Norwich, by will dated 1472, gave to the prioress of Carrowe 
2cxr., and to every nun there y. 4//.- Blom. AW/, ii. p. 382. 

Alice Norwych, widow, by her will proved 1472. gave to the prioress of Carhowe 2s. ; to 
every other nun there iid.— Register Gelour, f. 46. 

Agnes DroUe. widow of John Drolle, alderman of Norwich, by her will dated and proved 
1472, gave to the prioress of Carhowe 2od. ; to every other nun there Zd.—/b., f. 9 a. 

Jowetta Bumstcd, widow of Thomas Bumsted, by her will proved 1472, gave to the nuns 
at Carhowe y. 4d. — /*., f. 13 b. 

Roger Bresyngham. chaplain, by his will proved 1474, gave to the anchoress of Carowe 
ys. 4d.—/b., f. 52 a. 

John Banyard of Norwich, Esq.. by his will proved 1474, gave to the nuns at Carhowe los., 
to be divided among them, and 2or/. to the anchoress there.—/*., f. 56 b. 

Richard Rayc, citizen of Norwich, by his will, proved 1474, gave to the anchoress at 
Carhowe i2d.—/b., f. 66 a. 

Godfrid Joye, citizen and alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1474, gave to Margaret 
Pygott, prioress of Carhowe, y. 4d.\ to every other nun there Zd. ; to the anchoress there 12^ 
— /*., £ 68 b. 



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XVlll 



Car row Abbey: Appendices. 



Thomas Jeckys of Hunworth. by his will proved 1474, gave to the nuns at Carhowe zod.- 

Register Gelour, f. 80 a. , xt ■ t u v 

Agnes Segryme, widow of Ralph Segryme. late citizen and alderman of Nor>v.ch, by her 
will proved 1474. gave to the prioress of Carhowe lys. 4^.; to every sister there 2d.; to the 

anchoress there 2od. — lb., f. 81 b. . r <- u 

Richard Porynglond, chaplain, by his will proved 1475, gave to the pnoress of Carhowe 

35. 4./.; to the Lady Agnes Kyng there 3^. 4^.; to every other nun there izd.; to the Lady 
Ar JuUan Lampet, a recluse there, 6s. Sd. ; to each of her servants izd.-Id., f. 91 b. 

Henry Oudolf, citizen of Norwich, by his will proved I47S, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 

6s. Sd.—Id., f. 92 b. ^ • e 

William Davy, citizen of Norwich, by his will proved 1475- gave to the pnoress of 

Carhowe 8./.; to the Lady Margaret Folcard 3^. 4^.; to every other nun there 4^.-/*.. 

Alice, widow of Edmund Wychingham, Esq.. by her will proved 147S. gave to the nuns of 
Carrowe ioj. ; to the anchoress there 2od.—Jb., f. 115 a. 

William Walsingham, chaplain, by his will dated at Karrowe, 7th April, 1474. and proved 
16th January, 1475, directed to be buried in the church of the nuns of Karrowe by Norwich, 
before the door of the chapel of St. Ann ; and gave to the high altar 6s. 8d. ; to the pnoress 2^.; 
to every other nun there I2rf. ; to the Lady Julian Lampet, anchoress there, 6s. %d.-Ib., 

f. "5 b. _ . 

John Wyndham the elder, Esq., by his wiU proved i47S. gave to the nuns at Carhowe 

6s.^i.— lb., i. 120 h. 

Margaret, widow of Edmund Bedyngfeld, Esq., and sister and heir to Sir Thomas 
Tudenham, Knight, by her will proved 1476, gave to the repair of the nunnery of Carhowe 
by Norwich ioj.; to the nuns in the choir there lod.—Ib., f. 122 a. 

John Drewry, by his will proved 1476, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 6s. Bd.—Ib., f. 127 a. 

Agnes Reyner, widow, by her will proved 1476, gave to the nuns at Carhowe ios.-/b., 

f. 128 a. 

Walter Geffrey, citizen and aldennan of Norwich, by his will proved 1476. gave to the 

priory and nuns at Carhow 3J. 4d.—/b., f. 128 b. 

Robert Taylor, chaplain, by his will proved 1476, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 6s. Sd.— 

lb., f. 131. 

William Pepyr, citizen and alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1476, gave to every 

nun at Carhow 8^/. — /b., f. 142 b. 

John Byppys, chaplain, by his will dated 12th March, 1476, and proved 29th March, I477. 
gave to the anchoress at Carhowe Sd. ; to the nuns 3J. 4d.—Ib., f. 154 b. 
'"• Joan Croftys of Westhale. widow of Thomas Croftys, Gent., by her win proved 1477. gave 

to the nuns at Karrow 2od.—/b., f. 164 b. 

John Dykkes, chaplain, by his will proved 1477, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 3J. 4</.— /*., 

f. 165 b. 

John Alcok, chaplain, by his wUl proved I477, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 2od.—/b., 

f. 174 a. 

John Spendlove, chaplain, by his will dated in the feast of St. Augustine the Bishop, 1475, 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



XIX 



and proved 1477, gave to the Lady Julian Lampet, a recluse at Carhowe, is. \d.; to every nun 
there ^.—Register Gelour, f. 183 a. 

Robert Grond, clerk, by his will dated 26th August, 1477, and proved nth April, 1478, 
directed to be buried in the church of the nuns at Carhowe, and gave to the prioress izd.; to 
every sister there 4^. ; to the Lady Joan Elys, a nun professed there, 6s. Sd. ; Thomas Ryghtwys 
of Salle, one of his executors, and Thomas Elys, alderman of Norwich, supervisor.—/^., 
f. 189 a. 

William Hallys, chaplain, by his will dated 5th April, 1478, and proved i ith June following, 
directed to be buried in the conventual church at Carhowe, by the image of St. Barbara there, 
and gave to the altar of St. James there 3^. 4^. for a certein ; to the parish church of Carhowe, 
a legend ; to the Lady Joan, prioress there, 20^. ; to every sister there i2d. ; to the Lady 
JuUan Lampyt, anchoress there, i2d.—/b., f. 195 a. 

Thomas Caumbrigge. citizen of Norwich, by his will, proved 1479, gave to the nuns at 
Carhowe 4od. ; to the anchoress there 4od. ; to her maid 2od.—/b., f. 232 b. 

Edmund Bokenham of Snetterton, Esq., by his will proved 1479, gave to the prioress and 
nuns at Carhowe 13J. ^d. ; to the anchoress there 6s. Sd.— Register Caston, f. 36 a. 

John Heydon, Esq., by his will proved 1480, gave to every nun in Norfolk not having any 
annuity, \od. ; to every prioress 6s. Sd. ; to the anchoress at Carhowe 20s.— lb., f. 49 a. 

Thomas Sheef, citizen of Norwich, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 20^. ; to the anchoress 
\2d. Will proved 1480.-/3., f. 74 b. 

John Goche of Norwich, barber, gave to the nuns at Carhow 4s. Will proved 1481.— 
lb., f. 81 a. 

William Bruyn, chaplain, by his will proved 1481, gave to the nuns at Carrowe 40^.— 
lb,, f. 106 a. 

Edmund Colman, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1481, gave to the anchoress at 
Carrow i2d.; to Dame Margery Folcard, a nun there, 13s. 4^. and a habit cloth.— /3., 
f. 109 b. 

William Barbour, Rector of Gresham, by his will proved 1483, gave to the nuns at 
Carhowe 6s. Sd. — /b., f. 133 a. 

Thomas Storm, proctor of the Consistory Court, by his will proved 1483, gave to the 
prioress of Carrowe 2s.; to every nun there 12^., for a dirige and mass.— /3., f. 148 b. 

Margaret Purdance, Gentlewoman, widow of Richard Purdance, by her will proved 1483, 
but dated 1471, gave to the Lady Julian Lampet, anchoress at Carrowe, 20^.; to each of her 
servants 2a/.; to the nuns at Carrowe, to be divided equally, 13J. 4^.; to the repair of their 
church and houses 6s. Sd. [The legacy to the anchoress and servants had a line drawn through 
them, by which I imagine the anchoress was dead before the probate of this will].— /(J., 
f. 163 b. 

John Shottesham, chaplain, by his will proved 1483, gave to the prioress and nuns at 
Carrowe 4s.— lb., f. 176 b. 

John Fen-our of Wendlyng, by his will proved 1483, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 5J — 
lb., f. 185 b. 

Edmund Sylvester, chaplain, by his will proved 1483, gave to the nuns at Carrowe 6s. Sd.— 
lb., f. 191 a. 



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Cat-row Abbey: Appendices. 



John Ferrour of Gressenhall. by his will proved 1484, gave to the nuns at Carrowe ts. %d.~ 

Register Caston, f. 204 b. ,„.!.>„♦ 

William Kyng, citizen of Norwich, barker, by his will proved 1484. gave to the nuns at 

Carhowe as. — lb., f. 232 a. 

John Hebbes, citizen of Norwich, mercer, by his wiU proved i486, gave to the nuns at 

Carhowe iv. ^d.—Ib., f. 278 b. . <- ^ . . 

Ralf Est, citizen of Norwich, fletcher. by his wUl proved 1487, gave to the nuns at Carrowe 

to each nun ^i.—Ib.., f. 300 b. , , . j j j 

Richard Furneys, quondam heremita de Newbryg?. by his will, dated the 2nd and proved 

the 4th of May, 1464, gave to the prioress and convent of Carrowe y. 4^/.; to the Lady Juhan 

Lampet, a recluse there, \zd.— Register Jekkys, f. 15 b. 

Adam Kerbrook, chaplain, by his will proved 1466, gave to the prioress of Carhowe 20./. . 

to every nun there ^i. ; to the recluse there xzd.—Ib., f. 24 a. 

Margaret Furbysshour. widow of Robert Furbysshour. by her w.ll proved 1466, gave to 

every nun at Carhowe ^d.—Ib., f. 39 a. . ,, . • 

John GUbert, alderman of Norwich, by his will dated and proved .466, gave to the repair 

of the house of nuns at Carhowe 5 marks; to the prioress there , or. ; to Dame Catherine 

Segryme 10..; to Dame Margery Folcard 6.. 8^.; to Dame Joan Elys 6.. 8./.; to each other 

nun \2d. ; to the anchoress \2d. ; to her maydens %d.~Ib., f. 47 b- 

The Lady Isabell Morley, by her will proved 1466, gave to the prioress and nuns at Carhowe, 

to be divided amongst them, 20..; to Dame Julian the anchoress there 6.. Zd.-Jb I ^o a. 
John Ncketon of Sail, chaplain, by his will proved 1467. gave to the nuns at Carhowe 12^. 

"^^Thomas* Goldbeter of Norwich, by his wiU proved 1467. gave to the nuns at Carhowe 

'''^' Richard Ho^st of Norwich, by his will proved 1467, gave to the house of nuns of Carhowe, 
to repair their buildings, 40.. ; to the prioress 3^. 4^- ; to the sexton there 2S. ; to each other 
nun there I2d. ; to the anchoress 3^. ^.—Ib., f. 84 a. , , <• 

John Northalis, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1468. gave to the house of 
Carhowe 20rt'. ; to the prioress there 6d. ; to each nun ^.—Ib., f. 104 a. 

John Fyce of Nor^vich. by his will proved 1468, gave to the nuns at Carhowe. to be 
divided amongst them, 3^. 4^- 1 to Agnes Kyng, a nun there, 3^. 4^.-/*., f. i U b. 

Roger Bolytowth, by his will proved 1469, gave to the anchoress at Carhowe 12^.- 

" John Draylles, chaplain, dated 24th September and proved nth October. 147 «, directed to 
be buried within the monastery of St. Mary at Carrowe, and gave to the high altar there 
V 4// • to the prioress 5^.; to every nun there and to the anchoress I2rf.each; to every 
chaplain in Carrowe, viz., Robert Matteshall. William Halle, and William Walsingham, X2d. 

each.— /J. , f. 229 b. . • r 

William Lockwood alias Cl>-velond. by his will proved 1471. gave to the prioress of 

Carhowe 6^. 8^. ; to every nun there 20^. ; to the anchoress 5 J.-/*., 231 a. 

John Chyttok. alderman of Nor^vich, by his will proved 1471, gave to the prioress of 

Carhowe 2od. ; to every nun there I2d.—Ib., f. 251 b. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



XXI 



Henry Gardyner, chaplain, by his will proved 1471, gave to the prioress of Carhowe %d. ; 
to every nun there ^.—Register Jekkys, f. 254 b. 

Galfrid Champnes. Vicar of St. Stephen's in Norwich, by his will proved 1472, gave to the 
house of Carhowe 2s. ; to Dame Julian there \2d. —lb., f. 275 b. 

Joan Grene, a nun of Carhowe. occurs i^()^.— Register IVolman, p. 61, f. 19 a. 

Robert Toppe of Great Melton. Gent., by his will proved 1488. gave to the nuns at 
Carhow los.— Ib., f. i b. 

Robert Riall. chaplain of Sloley. by his will dated 1488, gave to the prioress of Carhowe 
&/. ; to every nun there 4//. ; to Dame Cecily Riall his sister, a nun there, ^os.—Ib. f. 13 a. 

Margaret Skipwith. widow of William Skipwith of Norwich, Esq., by her will proved 
1488, gave to the prioress of Carhowe 12^/.; to the sub-prioress 8</. ; to Dame Catherine 
Segryme, a nun there, 6j. 8^^. ; to every other nun there 4//. ; also she gave to the said house 
one table cloth and two napkins of diaper.— /(J., f. 18 b, 

Thomas Mowtyng. parson of Dysse, by his will proved 1490, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 
for a dirige and a mass 13J. 4//. — lb., f. 67 b. 

Robert Sharington, chaplain, by his will proved 1491, gave to the prioress of Carhowe 
(hi. ; to ever)' nun there yi. — lb. f. 102 a. 

Elizabeth Clere. widow of Robert Clere of Ormesby, Esq., by her will dated and proved 
1492, gave to every house of nuns in Norfolk and Norwich 66s. 8d., half for repairs and half 
to be divided amongst the nuns; to Mary Whyte, daughter of William Whyte, a nun at 
Carhowe, 20s. ; also 26s. 8d. a year for her life ; also to the said house at Carhow and divers 
others, los. a year; also to the said house at Carhow, and divers others, los. a year for two 
years to keep her ycarday for the said term, with placebo, dirige, and mass of requiem.— 
/b., f. 131 a. 

John Hendy of Mowton, by his will proved 1493, gave the convent at Carhowe 6s. 8d.— 
lb., f. 183 a. 

John Caster, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1494, gave to the prioress of 
Carhowe \2s., to every nun there Zd.—Ib., f. 185 a. 

Edmund Southwell of Norwich, by his will proved 1495, gave to the prioress of Carhowe 
l2d. ; to Dame Cecily Ryall, a nun there, 8^/. ; to every other nun ^.—Ib., f. 195 a. 

Sir William Calthorp, Knight, by his will proved 1494, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 20s.— 
Ib.t f. 206 a. 

Collctte Smyth, widow, gave to each nun at Carhow \2S. Proved 1494.—/^., 226 c. 

Robert Kerre of Norwich, by his will proved 1496, gave to the nuns at Carhowe equally 
amongst them 2s. — Register Multon, f. 10 c. 

William Gylbcrt of Norwich, by his will proved 1496, gave to each nun at Carhowe 4^/,— 

f. II a. 

John Hayne of Norwich, by his will proved 1496, gave to the nuns at Carhowe ^s. 4^.— 

f. 13 a. 

John Symonds, citizen of Norwich, by his will proved 1495, gave to the repair of the house 
of nuns at Carhowe y. 4//. — /b., f. 24 a. 

Roger Aylmer of Tutington. Esq., by his will proved 1497, gave to the prioress of Carhowe 
3J. 4d., to everj' nun there 12^. — lb., f. 49 a. 



lb 



lb 



It 



r 



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xxu 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



Robert Bull, priest, by his will proved 1497, gave to the house at Carhowe y. 4^. ; to each 
nun there Ad. ; to Dame Margaret 40*- ; to the chapel of Our Lady in the churchyard, y. Ad- 
Register Mult on, f. 52 b. . 

Bartholomew Wychingham of Swanton Abbots, gave to the abbey at Carhowe 2^.-/^,1. 

Joan Bukley, widow, by her will proved 1498. gave to the nuns at Carhowe bs. 8^- 

Ib.y f. 79 a. , . • •« A 

John Byshop of Norwich, gentleman, gave to the nuns at Carhowe lo.., by his will proved 

1408.—/^., f. 82 a. ... . o ^ *- 

Katherine Kerre of Norwich, genUewoman and widow, by her will proved .498, gave to 
the prioress of Carrowe X2d. ; to Dame Cecily Ryall, a nun there, dr. &/. and a smock cloth ; 
to Dame Mary Whjte, a nun there, 3^. Ad. and a smock cloth ; to Dame Ann Martyn, a nun 
there, 6.. %d. and a kirtle cloth and a smock cloth ; and to every other nun of the same place 
3.. 4./. ; to the repair of the church of Our Lady at Carhowe 12... to the repair of St. James 

church there ts. M.—Ib., f. 89 c. . r- x. j 

Robert Machon of Norwich, by his will proved 1498. gave to each nun at Carhowe 4^.- 

"' John Savage, Rector of St. Cement's in Norwich, by his wiU proved 1448. gave to Julian 
Lampet, a recluse at Carhowe 20s.— Register Aleyn, f. 12 a. ^ . u 

Joan Alkok of Norwich, widow, by her will proved 1449. gave to the nuns at Carhowe by 

Nonvichdf. 8</.— /3.,f. 15 b- , . /- v « 

John Chese, chaplain, by his will proved 1449, gave to the prioress and nuns at Carhowe 

loj.; to Dame Julian Lampet, anchoress there, ts. Sd. ; to Margaret her servant 12^.- 

"' Robert Everard, chaplain of Carehowe, by his will dated 20th March, 1449, and proved 
16th April. 1450, directed to be buried in the parish church of Carehowe, before the altar of 
St James, and gave to the prioress and nuns at Carehowe his messuage called Chyrchys, with 
"o acres of land lying in the towns and fields of Cowteshale and Hauteboys Magna. Skuryston. 
Belaghe by Cowteshale and Hoveton St. John, to keep yeariy his anniversary and that of his 
parents, and made the Lady Margaret Pigot, prioress of Carehowe, with others, executrix.- 

"' Robert Gunton, mercer of Norwich, by his will proved .450. gave to Joan Spaldyng a nun 
at Carhowe, 3s. 4^.; to all the other nuns there, equally amongst them, ts. Sd.-/K 

' ^^wiuiam Veautre, chaplain, by his will proved 1450, gave to the nuns of Carhowe 6.-8^. 
upon condition that they receive him as a brother of the convent of the said nuns.-/*., f. 
>g a 

Peter Gameys of Beklys, Esq.. by his wiU proved 1451. gave to the recluse at Carhowe 

6s. Sd.—Id., f. 101 b. , ^ ^ . /^ . V 

Robert Blyklyng of Norwich. Esq., by his will dated 5th July and proved i6th October. 
,452, directed to be buried in the church of St. Mary of Carhowe by Margaret his wife, and 
ordered a marble stone to be laid over their graves, and gave to Dame Julian the anchoress 
there 2ar. ; to the convent to repair the roof of their dormitory, 20 marks.-/*., f. 230 b. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



XXlll 



Agnes Martyn, widow of Thomas Martyn, mercer and citizen of Norwich, by her will 
proved 1453, gave to the nuns at Carhowe \y. Ad. 

Thomas Aleyn, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1553, gave to the prioress of 
St Mary of Carhowe y. Ad., and to every nun there \2d.— Register Aleyn, f. 184 a. 

Peter Mawc, chaplain, by his will proved 1480, gave to the nuns at Carhowe ds. %d.— 
Register Awbreye, f. 56 a. 

William Lancastere. Esq., by his will proved 1493, gave to every nun at Carrow i2j. — 
Register Typpes, i. 174 a. 

The Lady Eleanor Jenney, widow of Sir William Jenney. Knight, by her will proved 1496, 
gave to the nuns at Carhowe \os. — lb., f. 119 a. 

Richard Foxe of Norwich, by his will proved 1497, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 2s. — 
Register Multon, f. 48 a. 

Stephen Chyld of Trowse, by his will proved 1473, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 6s. 8d. — 
Register Pay not, f. 1 1 a. 

Joan Underwode, by her will proved 1473, gave to the repair of the church of Carhowe 
3J. A^.—Ib., f. 74 b. 

Robert Bylney of Brakendale, by Norwich, by his will proved 1493, gave to the 
prioress of Carhowe 4J.. and directed to be buried in the churchyard of the church of St. James 
of Carrowe aforesaid, and ordered two images, a Mary and a John, to be made and placed in 
the walls of the said church. — Register Sayve, f. 19 b. 

Thomas Weston, parson of Castre St. Edmund by Norwich, by his will dated at Carhowe, 
20th April, and proved 23rd May, 1499, directed to be buried in the holy sanctuary of Carrowe 
aforesaid, gave to the church there 4cw.; to the prioress 6s. Zd.\ to each of her nuns \2d.; to 
Dame Joan Green, whom he made supervisor, 40J.— /*. 

Robert Cook, citizen and alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1499, gave to the 
prioress and nuns of Carrowe 6s. Zd.— Register Wight, f. 3 a. 

John Smyth, chaplain, by his will dated 1493 and proved 1499, gave to every nun at 
Carrowe 3</.. to Dame Catherine Segryme. prioress there, \2d. — lb., f. 21 a. 

William Smyth, citizen of Norwich, by his will proved 1499, gave to each nun at Carhowe 
Ad. — lb., f. 22 c. 

Thomas Sty ward, citizen of Norwich, by his will proved 1500, gave to Dame Margaret 
Styward, a nun at Carrowe, ^od. — lb., f. 77 a. 

Thomas Plowman of Norwich, by his will proved 1501, gave to each nun at Carrowe Ad., 
and to the priest that serves them 4//. — lb., f. 90 b. 

John Stalon, citizen of Norwich, by his will proved 1500, gave to the prioress at Carhowe 
Zd., to every nun there 4//. — lb., f. 95 a. 

Alice Brown, widow of Richard Brown, citizen and merchant of Norwich, by her will 
dated 1464 and proved 1465. gave to the anchoress at Carhowe 2od. ; to the prioress there 
6j. Zd. ; to Dame Catherine Segryme 6s. Sd. ; to every other nun there i2d., and to the repair 
of their buildings 5 marks. — Register Cobbalde, f. 68 a. 

Thomas Grys of Norwich, by his will dated 1457, gave to the prioress and nuns at 
Carhowe y. Ad.— lb., f. 57 b. No probate. 



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A 



xxii 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



Robert Bull, priest, by his will proved 1497. gave to the house at Carhowe y. ^t ; to each 
nun there 4^. ; to Dame Margaret 40.- ; to the chapel of Our Lady in the churchyard, y. 4^.- 

Register Multon, f. 52 b. <- v 7* f 

Bartholomew Wychingham of Swanton Abbots, gave to the abbey at Carhowe 2^.-/*., t. 

68 a 

Joan Bukley, widow, by her will proved 1498. gave to the nuns at Carhowe ts. 8^.- 

^^'^ Joh^Byshop of Norwich, gentleman, gave to the nuns at Carhowe lo., by his wiU proved 

'"^^^K^fherLe'Kerre of Norwich, gentlewoman and widow, by her will proved 1498, gave to 
the prioress of Carrowe 12^. ; to Dame Cecily Ryall, a nun there, 6.. %d. and a smock cloth ; 
to Dame Mary Whyte, a nun there, y. 4^. and a smock cloth ; to Dame Ann Martyn, a nun 
there, 6.. 8^. and a kirtle cloth and a smock cloth ; and to every other nun of the same place 
3.. 4./. ; to the repair of the church of Our Lady at Carhowe 12... to the repair of St. James 
church there 6j. 8^.—/^., f. 89 c. 

Robert Machon of Norwich, by his will proved 1498, gave to each nun at Carhowe 4^.- 

^^" jJhn Savage, Rector of St. Gemenfs in Norwich, by his wiU proved 1448. gave to JuHan 
Lampet, a recluse at Carhowe 20J.—/?<§7>/<?r^/0'«,f. 12 a. 

Joan Alkok of Norwich, widow, by her will proved 1449. gave to the nuns at Carhowe by 

Norwich 6j. %d.—Ib., f. 15 b. • ^ ♦ r, »,«^. 

John Chese. chaplain, by his will proved 1449, gave to the prioress and nuns at Carhowe 

loi.; to Dame Julian Lampet. anchoress there, 6.. 8^.; to Margaret her servant 12^.- 

"' Robert Everard. chaplain of Carehowe, by his will dated 20th March, 1449. and proved 
.6th April, 1450. directed to be buried in the parish church of Carehowe, before the altar of 
St James, and gave to the prioress and nuns at Carehowe his messuage called Chyrchys, with 
"o acres of land lying in the towns and fields of Cowteshale and Hauteboys Magna, Skuryston. 
Belaghe by Cowteshale and Hoveton St. John, to keep yeariy his anniversary and that of h.s 
parents, and made the Lady Margaret Pigot, prioress of Carehowe, with otliers, executrix.- 

/(J., f. 39 a. T e 1J 

Robert Gunton, mercer of Norwich, by his will proved 1450. gave to Joan Spaldyng. a nun 
at Carhowe, 3^. 4^.; to all the other nuns there, equally amongst them, ts. ^-Ib.. 

' ^^William Veautre, chaplain, by his will proved 1450, gave to the nuns of Carhowe 6.-8^. 
upon condition that they receive him as a brother of the convent of the said nuns.-/^, f. 

^* %eter Gameys of Beklys, Esq.. by his wiH proved 1451. gave to the recluse at Carhowe 

6s. Zd.—Ib.y f. 101 b, , J /: u rv * u 

Robert Blyklyng of Norwich. Esq., by his will dated 5th July and proved 16th October 
1452, directed to be buried in the church of St. Mary of Carhowe by Margaret h.s wife, and 
ordered a marble stone to be laid over their graves, and gave to Dame Julian the anchoress 
there 20s. ; to the convent to repair the roof of their donnitory, 20 marks.-/*., f. 230 b. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



XXI n 



Agnes Martyn, widow of Thomas Martyn, mercer and citizen of Norwich, by her will 
proved 1453, gave to the nuns at Carhowe ly. 4^. 

Thomas Aleyn. alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1553, gave to the prioress of 
St. Mary of Carhowe y. 4^., and to every nun there 12^. — Register Aleyn, f. 184 a. 

Peter Mawe, chaplain, by his will proved 1480, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 6s. Zd. — 
Register Awbreye, f. 56 a. 

William Lancastere. Esq., by his will proved 1493, gave to every nun at Carrow 12 J. — 
Register Typpes, f. 174 a. 

The Lady Eleanor Jenney, widow of Sir William Jenney. Knight, by her will proved 1496. 
gave to the nuns at Carhowe loj. — lb., f. 1 19 a. 

Richard Foxe of Norwich, by his will proved 1497, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 2s. — 
Register Multon, f. 48 a. 

Stephen Chyld of Trowse, by his will proved 1473, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 6s. %d. — 
Register Pay not, f. 1 1 a. 

Joan Underwode, by her will proved 1473, gave to the repair of the church of Carhowe 
y. ^.—Ib., f. 74 b. 

Robert Bylney of Brakendale, by Norwich, by his will proved 1493, gave to the 
prioress of Carhowe \s., and directed to be buried in the churchyard of the church of St. James 
of Carrowe aforesaid, and ordered two images, a Mary and a John, to be made and placed in 
the walls of the said church. — Register Sayve, f. 19 b. 

Thomas Weston, parson of Castre St. Edmund by Norwich, by his will dated at Carhowe, 
20th April, and proved 23rd May, 1499, directed to be buried in the holy sanctuary of Carrowe 
aforesaid, gave to the church there 40J.; to the prioress 6s. 8d.; to each of her nuns 12^. ; to 
Dame Joan Green, whom he made supervisor. 40s.— /b. 

Robert Cook, citizen and alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1499, gave to the 
prioress and nuns of Carrowe 6j. Sd. — Register Wight, f. 3 a. 

John Smyth, chaplain, by his will dated 1493 and proved 1499, gave to every nun at 
Carrowe yi., to Dame Catherine Segryme, prioress there, 12^. — lb., f. 21 a. 

William Smyth, citizen of Norwich, by his will proved 1499, gave to each nun at Carhowe 
4^. — lb., f. 22 c. 

Thomas Styward, citizen of Norwich, by his will proved 1500, gave to Dame Margaret 
Styward, a nun at Carrowe, yid. — lb., f. 77 a. 

Thomas Plowman of Norwich, by his will proved 1501, gave to each nun at Carrowe 4//., 
and to the priest that serves them 4//. — lb., f. 90 b. 

John Stalon, citizen of Norwich, by his will proved 1500. gave to the prioress at Carhowe 
Zd., to every nun there 4//. — lb., f. 95 a. 

Alice Brown, widow of Richard Brown, citizen and merchant of Norwich, by her will 
dated 1464 and proved 1465, gave to the anchoress at Carhowe 2od. ; to the prioress there 
6s. Zd. ; to Dame Catherine Segryme 6s. Zd. ; to every other nun there 12^., and to the repair 
of their buildings 5 marks. — Register Cobbalde, f. 68 a. 

Thomas Grys of Norwich, by his will dated 1457, gave to the prioress and nuns at 
Carhowe 3J. j\d.—Ib., t. 57 b. No probate. 



]/ 



f- 



y 



XXIV 



C arrow Abbey: Appendices. 



Alice Nyche of Norwich, by her will proved 1466. gave to the pnoress of Carhowe 2s. , 
every nun there 8rf. ; to the anchoress 3^. 4^.-^<?^V/.r Mdal^i^, f. 90 b. 

WUliam Fyssher of Norwich, by his wiU proved 1466, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 20./. 

''" idam Ryall of Sloley, by his will dated and proved 1466. gave to Dame Cecily Ryall. his 

dauffhter, a nun at Carhowe, 4QI.— /«•, f- 103 a. ,k„„,. „ rarhowe 

Petei la Bolle of Nonvich, by his will proved .466. gave to the anchoress at Carhowe 

''' "^^r/cierke^tf'Nor^ich, widow of John Clerk., by her will proved u66. gave to the nuns 

" ^^^'^ Bller. widow of Sir Andrew Boteler, Knight, by her will dated and 
provedT4L ga^to D^e Julian Lampet, anchoress at Carhow ,o..-«.^W B^yu^. 6 b. 
' jihn Vvygenhale, ArchLcon of Sudbury, by his will dated ,460, gave .0 the pnores « 
Carhowe 6r. &/. , .0 every nun there W. , to Dame Julian Lampet, a recluse there, ,y. *'- 

'"" Gregory Draper, alderman of Norwich, by his wiU proved .464. gave to the nuns at 
rnrViowe icy., to the anchoress 2S. — lb,, f. 90 a. 

^h "d Tomson of Norwich, chaplain, by his wiU proved ,464, gave .0 the nuns a. Carhow 

*°^^hn' DrolCalderman of Non.ich,by his will proved 1467, gave to the prioress of Carrowe 

"od. : and to each nun there \2d.—Ib., f. I35 a- . r^rV,<^ur#. 

John Causton, citizen of Nor>.ich, by his will proved .463, gave to every nun of Carhowe 
!-»// ■ tr» the nrioress 25. ; to the anchoress zs. — lb., f. i6i a. 

Mrrgaref Stubbe of Norwich, widow, gave, by her will proved .464, to the nuns a. 
Carhowe 6s. U. ; to the anchoress there .M. ; to her servant A^.-Ji., f- 164 a. 

Thomas Aylemer of Norwich, by his will dated and proved .500, gave to every nun 

'^'"E^Lt;: ^S:: wX'oVlltnry Lovell, Lord Morley. by her will dated at Norwich 
,o.h December, and proved „th Februar>-, .,^ directed to be buH^ ,. the c urch o the 
nuns at Carrowe, and gave to the prioress there 6s. 8rf., and to every nun 3^. A^.-Ii.. I- l83 b 
RthaTpynnes of Est Derham. senior, by his will proved .500, gave to the nuns at 

'^*Thlt Wo'^^t'of No;wich, by his will proved ,5=0. gave .0 the nuns at Carhow 3.. ^.- 

""' Joan Drake, wife of William Drake, and late wife of Stephen Bryan, alderman of Norwich, 
by her wiU proved 1 500, gave to the nuns at Carhow los.-lb., f. J23 a- 

Annable Kyng of Norwich, by her will proved .50.. gave to each nun at Carrowe 4^- 

^'IIT'.; vl^arof Melton Parv^a, by his will proved in ,50., gave to each nun at 

'";n:h:f::c;iith.°:iderman of Norwich, by his will proved .50. gave ,0 the house f 
nuns at Carrowe .0.. ; and .0 each nun there 4^. : and every year for seven years to each nun 
5</. ; and to the prioress %d. — lb., f. 125 a. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



XXV 



William Thacker of Nonvich, by his will dated and proved 1502, gave to the lady 
prioress of Carhow \zd. ; to Dame Joan Green \2d. ; to every other nun 4^. — Register Popeye, 
f. 166 a. 

Sir Harry Alicocke, parson of Colney, by his will proved 1502, gave to the lady prioress 
7od. ; to the lady cellaress \2d. ; to every other nun 4^. — lb., f. 187 a. 

William Drake of Norwich, Gent., by his will proved 1502, gave to the nuns at Carrowe 
lOf. — lb., f. 237 a. 

John Raas of Trowse, by his will dated and proved 1502, directed to be buried in the 
holy sanctuary of the nuns of Carhow, and gave to the prioress zod., and to each nun xzd., 
and a great maser for the use of the said house. — lb.., f. 240 b. 

Elizabeth Walsh of Norwich, by her will proved 1502, gave to the prioress of Carrow 8</., 
and to each nun there 4/^. — lb., f. 243 a. 

Margaret Radclyflf alias Curteys of Norwich, by her will proved 1502, gave to the prioress 
of Carrowe, \2d. ; to every nun there 4^. — lb., f. 247 a. 

Hamond Claxton, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1502, gave to the nuns at 
Carrowe ys. 4//. ; to the prioress \2d. — lb., f. 258 b. 

Henry Ferman of Norwich, one of the attornies of the Common Pleas, by his will proved 
1503, gave to the house of nuns at Carrow \os., of which 35. 4^. to repair the church, the rest 
amongst the ladies at the discretion of the lady prioress. — lb., f. 212 b. 

Isabell Donham of Norwich, by her will proved 1503, gave to the nuns at Carrowe ts. Sd. — 
Ji., f. 290 b. 

Ann Drury of Norwich, first widow of John Pagrave, Esq., and after of Roger Drury, Esq., 
by her will proved 1503, gave to the nuns at Carrowe 6s. Sd. — /b., f. 328 a. 

Robert Belconger of Brakyndele, by his will dated 1502 and proved 1503, directed to be 
buried before the image of St. Christopher at the procession door of the church of St. James at 
Carrowe, and gave to every nun of Carrowe at his burial day, week-day, and thirtieth day, 4d. — 
It., f. 364 b. 

Andrew Sparrowe of Yelverton, by his will proved 1503, gave to the prioress of Carrowe 
8</.; to every nun there 4d. — /b., f. 415 or between that and c. 419. 

Clare Wythmall, widow, of Norwich, by her will proved 1503, gave to every nun at 
Carrowe 4//. — 16., f. 422 b. 

Joan Aylmer of Norwich, widowe, by her will proved and dated 1503, gave to Agnes 
Sherman, a nun at Carrowe, 3J. 4d. — lb., f. 445 a. 

Thomas Bewfeld, citizen and alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1504, gave to every 
nun at Carrowe 2od., and 2od. more each at his year-day. 

Geoffrey Styward. alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1 504, gave to every nun at 
Carrowe 4d. — fb., f. 507 b. 

Jone Heyne of Norwich, widow, by her will proved 1 504, gave to the nuns at Carrowe 
3J. 4d. — /b., f. 516 a. 

Agnes Horsley of Norwich, widow, by her will proved 1504, gave to the prioress of 
Carrowe Sd., and to each nun 4d. — /b., f. 518 a. 

Sir William Swetman, sen., parson of All Saints in Ber Street, by his will proved 1504, 
gave to the prioress of Carrow 6s. Sd. ; to every nun there 3^. 4d. — lb., f. 546 b. 









XXVI 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



Ca*erin. BewreM.^idow or The. Be»fe,d, a,de™,n of No^ich.b, her «m proved 

-:^rKr? r™-ch^::z:r,;e^'^:«;o- .y. .ve „ e.h „. . ..o.. ^.- 

'*■' Arnl'-Parker of NonvUh, widow, by her will proved ,505, gave ,0 .he nun, a, Carro.e 
''■ ',tta*Dad:1f Wiuon, b, hU wi,. proved ,sc«, gave .0 .he nun, a. Carrowe ...-«.. 
' "aL Ba«s of Norwich, widow, by her wiU proved .506, gave .0 .he nuns a. Carrowe 
'^•^h::tlCgeofK„™ich,b,h.«.d^d^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

'■ ''^Richard Bax.er, pries., by hi, wi„ proved ,5c.. gave ,0 ,he abbey of Carrowe. »-/*.. 

^- ^57 b. r vT ■ 1, Kv hi.; will Droved 1507, gave to the nuns at Carhowe 

John Pythode, alderman of Norwich, b> his will provea b /, k 

-1,:„:\'^,Ca,der.an - ^f' ^ ^^^^^^^^^s;::^'^' ^ 
-'t^rv^/eirXr^tr :nt SnX: ;> ^a. .o^ed ..., .. .o .he 
prioress of Carrow 8rf., and ,0 every nun .here V-/^. • 4 »-^ ^^ ^^^^^ 

John Mere of Norwich, by his w.U proved da.ea I500, g 

'"■ Im^e* Drie of Kor^vich, widow, by her wii. proved , 508. gave .0 U,e nuns a. Carrowe 
'^- ^U« Carrer, aldennan of Norwich, by his will proved .508. gave .0 U.e repair of .he 
'"" Th1lT^e';''orN*„;,^ic'h,%,.. by his wiU proved ,508, gave .0 .he pHores, of 
Carrowe id., and to each nun .here V-«-. '• '"S »• ^ „ carrowe y. 4^- 

rCr;^;';'^;"^;: rrtr '.^ ga. .o .ach .ad, a. carrow. 
"^•"^'uitrLgg of carrowe, by his wi,. proved , S09, direCed .0 be buried in .he church of 
S.. jan,e, .here, and gave .0 ''-^-/^^'^^t'r's^erby hi, will proved ,3.0, gave ,0 ,he 
„un,T?airr:up:''— :«e - cha., o^ S.. Ca.heHn. .0 .he par,on who 

n'nrwtarorNrirrht-wi.fproved .3.0. gave .0 .he prioress of Carrowe .^. 
-' rrs;r o^rw^r^^r cinlrb, ., wi,. proved .S... gave .0 .he prioress 
'' ZZ:. ^rrslir " ino«7.t:ga«^ - pnores. Of Carrowe .. ^. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



xxvii 



to Dame Joan Greene y. \i.\ to every other sister there \2d.\ to every servant there 4^. 
— Register Johnson, f. 74 a. 

Robert Barnard of Norwich, Esq., by his will proved 1511, gave to every nun at Carhowe 
Zd.—Ib., i. 74 b, 

Robert Bumham, clerk, by his will proved 1512, gave to the nuns at Carhowe for a pittance 
I2d,\ to Dame Catherine Jervys 4</. — lb., f. 138 b. 

John Walters, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 15 12, gave to each nun at Carrowe 
4//.—/*., f. 211 b. 

John Rokett, parson of Bergh by Apton, by his will proved 1513, gave to the prioress of 
Carrow 2s., to every other nun there I2d.—Ib. f. 222 a. 

William Cubett of Nettisherd, by his will proved 15 13, gave to the nuns at Carrow 10//., to 
the reparation of their house. — lb., f. 234 a. 

Richard Brasier, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1513, gave to the nuns at 
Carrowe 20j. — Register Coppynge, f. 81 a. 

Henry Attmere, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1513, gaveto the prioress of 
Carrowe \2d., to each nun there 4//. — lb., f. 87 a. 

Joan Clerk, wife of Gregory Clerk, alderman of Norwich, by her will proved 1513, gave to 
every nun at Carrowe 4d., and to the prioress Sd. — /b., f. 94 b. 

Richard Lumhalx, vicar of Surlingham, by his will proved 15 13, gave to the house at 
Carrowe 20s. — /b., f. 108 a. 

Robert Har>daunce of Norwich, by his will proved 15 14, gave to the nuns at Carrowe 
6s. Sd.—/b., f. 112 a. 

Richard Ferrour, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1 5 1 5, gave to each nun at 
Carrow (xi.— Register Spyelynge, f. 168 c, 

James London of Tomston, by his will dated and proved 1515, gave to the abbey of 
Carrow 13J. 4^., to his sister there 20J. — /b., i. 182 c. 

John Giggs of Norwich, grocer, by his will proved 1 518, gave to every nun at Carhow 4// 
— Register Gylys, f . 66 b 

Henry Mounford of Norwich, clerk and parson of Erpingham, by his will proved 15 18, 
gave to each nun at Carrowe 4</. — lb., f. 82 a. 

Thomas Large, alderman of Norwich, by his will dated 1515 and proved 15 18, gaveto 
each nun at Carhowe 4^., and to the prioress %d. — lb., f. 95 b. 

Elizabeth Thursby of Norwich, widow, by her will proved 15 18, gave to the prioress of 
Carrowe \2d., and to each other nun 4//. — lb., f. 97 a. 

Gregory Clerk of Norwich, by his will proved 15 18, gave to the nuns at Carrow y. i4. 
— lb., f. 102 b. 

John Swayn, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1517, gave to each nun professed at 
Carrowe 8</., to each other nun there ^.—Ib., f. 133 a. 

John Harvey, sen., of Melton Magna, by his will proved 15 19, gave to the nuns at 
Carrow Abbey 40S.-~Ib., f. 140 a. 

John Notell, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1520, gave to the nuns at Carrow 
3od. — Register Robynson, f. 131 b. 



i I 



4 ; 



f\ 



XXVlll 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



Dame Margery Robert, widow of Sir James Robert, Knight, by her will proved 1517. 
gave to the nuns at Carrow ^os.— Register Briggs, f. 49 b. 

John Marsham, alderman of Norwich, by his will dated 1525, gave to each of the nuns at 
Carrowe 4^., to the prioress iid.—Ib., f. 107 b. 

William Rart, Alderman of Norwich, by his will dated 1532. gave to the anchoress at 
Carrow M.— Register Hayward, f. 61 a. 

Walter Mego of Burgh by Aylsham, by his will proved 1526, gave to the nuns at Carrowe 

3J. 4^.— /*., f. 78 a. 

John Swayne, alderman of Norwich, by his will proved 1 514, gave to each nun professed 
at Carrowe &/., and to each novice there ^.—Ib., f. 124 b. 

John Alblaster of Worstede, by his will proved 1520, gave to the nuns at Carrowe y. 4^.— 

Register Alablaster, f. 6 a. 

Margaret Quash of Norwich, widow, by her wiU proved 1520, gave to the anchoress at 

Carrowe %d.—Ib., f. 80 b. 

John Blyawnt, Esq., gave to the house of Carhow icw. The will proved 1521.— J*. loi b. 

Robert Eliet, vicar of Wroxham, by his will proved 1524, gave to the prioress of Carhow 
y. 4^. ; to each nun there 8d.—Ib., f. 225 a. 

Elizabeth Felmingham. widow, by her will proved 1524, gave to the anchoress at Carrowe 
I2d. ; to every nun there ^.—Register Grundesburgh, f. i a. 

Thomas Bowyer, vicar of St. Stephen's, by his will dated and proved 1530, gave to the 
nuns at Carrowe ds. M— Register Palgravi, f. 81 b. 

Margaret Browne of Norwich, widow, by her will dated 1530 and proved 1531, gave to 
each nun at Carrow 4//. — Ib.y f. 119 a. 

Edmund Clark of Norwich, by his will dated and proved 1518, gave to each nun at 

Carrowe ^.—Ib., f. 197 a. 

Richard Gryme of Norwich, by his will dated and proved 1531, gave to every nun at 

Carrowe 4^.— Register Aipe, f. 1 54 b. 

Simond Skottowe of Aylesham, by his will dated 1530, gave to the nuns at Carrowe 

2od. — Register Godsalve, f. 71 a. 

William Roone, alderman of Norwich, by his will dated 21st July, 1535. and proved 
16th March following, gave to the prioress and nuns at Carrowe 3^. ^.—Ib., f. 79 b. 

WiUiam AUeyn, alderman of Norwich, by his wiU dated 24th March, 1534, proved 12th 
August, 1535, gave to Dame Margaret Steward, a nun at Carrow, i2d.—Ib., f. 118 a. 

Alice Browne of Norwich, widow, by her wiU proved 1533, gave to the prioress of Carrow 
Sd., and to each nun there 4d.— Register Platfoot^ f. 47 b. 

Elizabeth Yaxley, widow of John Yaxley, Serjeant-at-law, by her will dated 1530, and 
proved 26th March, 1533, directed to be buried at Mellis, by her husband, if she died there ; 
but if she died at Carrow, then to be buried in the church of our Lady there, at the end of the 
high altar, before the image of our Lady, and gave s marks among the nuns for breaking the 
ground, and ordered a stone to be laid over her there of the price of 66j. %d. Also she gave 
to the said church a cloth of tapestry work with the stories of the Nativity, Resurrection, and 
Epiphany, and to hang in their church at solemn feasts, that they might remember hers and 
her husband's soul; also to the anchoress at Carrow 2s. ; to Dame Maud, a nun there, iw. and 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



XXIX 



y. 4//. yeariy for life, and other things ; and to the repair of St. James and church there 
dr. %d. ; and to the lady prioress, whom she made supervisor of her will, her cloth of the three 
kings of Colyn; and 40J. to each of the sisters a remembrance at the discretion of her 
executors ; also she would that her servants should be boarded with the said lady prioress for 
one month after her decease, paying izd. a week each. Isabell Wygon, prioress of Carrowe, 
witness. — Register Platfoot, f. 104 b. 

John Cobbe of Norwich, by his will dated 1500, gave to the repair of the nuns' church at 
Carrow 6j. Zd. — Register Craforde, f. 82 a. 

William Aslake of Carrow by Norwich, Esq., by his will dated 4th June, 1531, and proved 
20th September, 1 532, directed to be buried in the Church of our Lady of Carrow, between 
the high altar and the image of our Lady of Pity, and gave 20s. for breaking the ground ; a 
dirige and mass to be sung for his soul there, and gave to all the nuns for the same ^d.— Register 
Aipe, f. 195 b. 

Thomas Waterman of Norwich, parson of All Saints' in Ber Street, and of the chapel of 
St. Catherine, by his will dated 1546, and proved 1547, gave to Mrs. Kydman sometime 
anchoress of Carrowe 6s. M — Register Wymer, f. 75 a. 

Lady Ann Shelton of Carhcwe next Norwich, widow, late the wife of Sir John Shelton, 
Knight, by her will dated 19th December, 1556, and proved 8th January following, directed to 
be buried in the chancel of the Church of Czxhovrc— Register Ganges, f. 175 a. 



APPENDIX X. 



Being a short Account of the various Landed Possessions of 

THE Priory. 



Apton.— See Bergh Apton. 

Bastwick [Wood.]— In 1291 the abbey lands here were valued at 11s. 4^., and in 1428 at the 

same price. They were probably the lands granted with the Wroxham property {g.v.) 

by John de Recham in the i8th Edward I. 
Becston St. Andrew, or by Norwich.— Valued at 6s. Zd. in 1291. These, too, were probably 

part of the lands which went with Wroxham (y.v.) 
Bergh Apton.— Two parts of the tithes of the demesnes here, valued at two marks, were 



^ 1- 



i . 



XXX 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



XXXI 



given by William de Muntchensey, no doubt a relation of the prioress of that name, 
and this was afterwards compounded for at twelve quarters of wheat. This gift is related 
thus by N orris : — 

" In the beginning of this reign also, William de Munchensy, a great and wealthy 
" Baron, who had many and large possessions both in Norfolk and Suffolk, and being 
"patron of the churches of Bergh and Apeton, gave to the Prioress and Convent here 
"the tithes of all the wheat growing in these parishes, which they got confirmed to them 
" by John de Gray, Bishop of Norwich. They had also divers lands in Rockland and the 
"adjoining towns, for which they paid a rent of ^s. per annum to the manor of Bergh, 
"and 2\h%. of frankincense to the church there, which lands it is probable were given them 
" by the same person. The tithes of the wheat before mentioned occasioned many disputes 
" between the Rector and the Convent, till at length about the year 1237 it was agreed by 
"the Prioress and Convent, and Thomas, the then Rector, by the interposition of Ralph, 
" Bishop of Norwich, that the Rector should pay to the Convent 14 quarters of wheat in 
"lieu of all their tithes there, which was constantly paid, with some little allowance for 
"defect of measure, until the 29th of Edward III., when there was a suit between the 
" Prioress and Rector about them. What was the event of it I find not, but they soon 
"after returned to the old payment of 14 quarters, which continued until the 21st 
" Henry VI., when the dispute was revived, and in a litigious way they continued above 
" ten years, but 1 find they afterwards returned again to the old agreement, and kept to it, 
" I believe, to the dissolution of the Priory." 

Among the Bodleian Charters (No. 300) is a judgment of John, Bishop of Norwich, in 
a suit between the Prior and Convent of Carrow on the one part, and the Rector of Bergh 
of the other part, dated 3 non. November, 1321. 

A composition in this suit, dated the same year, is in the Tanner MSS. 151, fo. 8, and 
a copy of the above sentence, ib. fo. 9. 

The property was valued at 5J. \od. in 1291. 
Bemham (Suffolk.)-In the 27th Edward I. they received five marks of the executors of John 
le User, of Bemham, for an anniversary for the soul of the said John. They had ioj. per 
annum rent arising out of lands in Bemham, which rent it is probable was given them by 
this John Le User. The lands out of which the rent was issuing were, in the reign of 
Henry VI., in the possession of Sir Ralph Shirley, Knight, and in the time of Edward IV., 
of Sir Thomas Shirley, Knight, by which it appears to be Bemham in SuffolL-A'crrrJ. 
Biskele or Bixley.-In 8th Henry III.. 1223, a close letter issued directing the sheriff to allow 
the Prioress of Karhow to have peace of the debt of the Jews which he exacted from her 
for the fee of Saer de Biskele.— C/w<f Letters, p. 61 1. 

In 1233 Hughelina, widow of William fil. Saer de Biskele conveyed lands here to the 
abbess {Feet of Fines, Norfolk, i8th Henry III., No. 590.) In 1246 another fine was 
levied as to land in this parish, by John Chese against Agnes the prioress, and Galford de 
Biskele intervened. In 1291 her land was valued at £2. \2s. %d. In 1294 the capital 
pledges of Biskelee set out the boundaries of Carrow Manor {Norris) In 1347 it was 
found that the prioress held a quarter of a knight's fee and half a knight's fee of John 



Segrave. and he of the king {Book of Aids.) The half a knight's fee, according to 
Blomefield (v. p. 448) was that granted by Hughelina, and was held of Forncett manor. 
In 5th Richard II., their land here was valued at a quarter of a knight's fee. He also says 
the prioress had a foldcourse here. Before the nth Henry VI. this property had vested in 
the College of Mettingham— see inquisition p.m. of John de Mowbray, nth Henry VI., 
No. 43- 

Blofield.— Valued in 1291 at 4J. 5*/. Probably some of Blofield land granted with Wroxham 
{q.v.) 

Brackenden or Bracondale.— Valued in 1291 at y. 4^. In the Ministers' Accounts it is called 
Brakendell and Trows, and was then valued at £9. 19J. 2d. Also see Lakenham. 

Burhthorp (Bowthorp).— Land here was valued at is. in 1291. 
Burlingham S. . . . — Ditto. 

Carrow.— The whole property here was valued in 1291 at £s- ^9^- S'^- ^^ the Valor the 
temporalities were taken at £2^. is. il^., and in the Ministers' Accounts zx£i. 14^- 9^^- 

only. 

Parts of the land were held of the respective manors of Framingham, Fomcett, 

Berghall, Lakenham, and Spixworth, and paid quit rents (?) of \d., id., ^s., 2,s. 7\d., and 

y. See deductions in the Vaior. Other parts were charged, i.a., with a payment to the 

Hospital of St. Giles of Norwich of ()ld. a year. 

5 Henry V.— In this fifth year they had a suit with the prior and convent of Norwich 

about their court lete in Carhowe and Trous, in which the nuns prevailed, but not without 

much trouble and expense. The prioress herself went twice to London about it, and the 

charges of the suit came to upwards of ;^ioo, which they could ill afford, for they were that 

whole sum and somewhat more in debt at the year's end. 
Catton.— Land here was valued at 2s. 4//. in 129 1. In the Valor at 5 J. 
Chediston.— In 1291 land here was valued at y. This is probably Kerdiston, at which place 

the Warrens, patrons of Carrow, had a lordship. 
Coltishall.— Robert Everard, Chaplain of Carrow, by his will dated 1449 {Register Aleyn, fo. 39), 

gave his tenement called Churches and 20 acres of land here to the prioress. 
Crostweyt, or Crostwick.— The abbey lands here were valued in 1291 at £2. 13s. id. They 

were probably some of those at Crostwick which were granted with land at Wroxham by 

John de Hecham in ist Edward I. 

In 1335 the prioress had licence to receive lands here in mortmain which were 

purchased of John de Hecham, and held of her manor of Wroxham.— Blomefield's Norfolk, 

X. 421. 
Dunham.— Lands here in 1291 were valued at 4j. 6d. 
Earlham.-The advowson here is said by Blomefield to have been granted by one Ralph de 

Erlham, and confirmed by another. We find that in 1249 Ralph de Erlham granted 26 

acres of land and the advowson to the prioress in consideration of being received into the 



I' 



i^ 



1) 






X 



XXX 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



XXXI 



given by William de Muntchetisey, no doubt a relation of the prioress of that name, 
and this was afterwards compounded for at twelve quarters of wheat. This gift is related 
thus by N orris : — 

" In the beginning of this reign also, William de Munchensy, a great and wealthy 
" Baron, who had many and large possessions both in Norfolk and Suffolk, and being 
" patron of the churches of Bergh and Apeton, gave to the Prioress and Convent here 
•'the tithes of all the wheat growing in these parishes, which they got confirmed to them 
"by John de Gray, Bishop of Norwich. They had also divers lands in Rockland and the 
•'adjoining towns, for which they paid a rent of 5J. per annum to the manor of Bergh, 
•• and 2 lbs. of frankincense to the church ther*>, which lands it is probable were given them 
•• by the same person. The tithes of the wheat before mentioned occasioned many disputes 
"between the Rector and the Convent, till at length about the year 1237 it was agreed by 
"the Prioress and Convent, and Thomas, the then Rector, by the interposition of Ralph, 
" Bishop of Norwich, that the Rector should pay to the Convent 14 quarters of wheat in 
"lieu of all their tithes there, which was constantly paid, with some little allowance for 
••defect of measure, until the 29th of Edward III., when there was a suit between the 
•' Prioress and Rector about them. What was the event of it I find not, but they soon 
"after returned to the old payment of 14 quarters, which continued until the 21st 
•• Henry VI., when the dispute was revived, and in a litigious way they continued above 
" ten years, but I find they afterwards returned again to the old agreement, and kept to it, 
" I believe, to the dissolution of the Prior>'." 

Among the Bodleian Charters (No. 300) is a judgment of John, Bishop of Norwich, in 
a suit between the Prior and Convent of Carrow on the one part, and the Rector of Bergh 
of the other part, dated 3 non. November, 1321. 

A composition in this suit, dated the same year, is in the Tanner MSS. 151, fo. 8, and 
a copy of the above sentence, ib. fo. 9. 

The property was valued at 5J. icx/. in 1291. 
Bemham (Suffolk.)— In the 27th Edward I. they received five marks of the executors of John 
le User, of Bemham, for an anniversary for the soul of the said John. They had \os. per 
annum rent arising out of lands in Bemham, which rent it is probable was given them by 
this John Le User. The lands out of which the rent was issuing were, in the reign of 
Henry VI., in the possession of Sir Ralph Shirley, Knight, and in the time of Edward IV., 
of Sir Thomas Shirley, Knight, by which it appears to be Bemham in Suffolk.— A'(Orrfj. 
Biskele or Bixley.— In 8th Henry III., 1223, a close letter issued directing the sheriff to allow 
the Prioress of Karhow to have peace of the debt of the Jews which he exacted from her 
for the fee of Saer de Biskele.— C/<?j^ Letters, p. 61 1. 

In 1233 Hughelina, widow of William fil. Saer de Biskele conveyed lands here to the 
abbess {Feet 0/ Fines, Norfolk, 18th Henry III., No. 590.) In 1246 another fine was 
levied as to land in this parish, by John Chese against Agnes the prioress, and Galford de 
Biskele intervened. In 1291 her land was valued at £2. 12s. %d. In 1294 the capital 
pledges of Biskelee set out the boundaries of Carrow Manor {Norn's.) In 1347 it was 
found that the prioress held a quarter of a knight's fee and half a knight's fee of John 



{ 



Segrave, and he of the king {Book of Aids) The half a knight's fee, according to 
Blomefield (v. p. 448) was that granted by Hughelina, and was held of Fomcett manor. 
In 5th Richard II., their land here was valued at a quarter of a knight's fee. He also says 
the prioress had a foldcourse here. Before the i ith Henry VI. this property had vested m 
the College of Mettingham-see inquisition p.m. of John de Mowbray, nth Henry VI., 
No. 43- 
Blofield.-Valued in 1291 at 4^. ^d. Probably some of Blofield land granted with Wroxham 

Brackenden or Bracondale.-Valued in 1291 at 3^. 4^/- In the Ministcri Accounts it is called 
Brakendell and Trows, and was then valued at £<). igs. 2d Also see Lakenham. 

Burhthorp (Bowthorp).-Land here was valued at is. in 1291. 

Burlingham S. . . .—Ditto. 

Carrow.-The whole p.opcrty here was valued in 1291 at £s- ^9S- S^- I" the r<^/.r the 
temporalities were taken at £25. is. i^-and in the Ministers' Accounts at/i. 14^. 9^- 

°"^ Parts of the land we:e held of the respective manors of Framingham, Fomcett, 
Ber-hall. Lakenham, and Spixworth, and paid quit rents (?) of \d., id, 5^., 8-»- 7^-, and 
y. "see deductions in the Va/or. Other parts were charged, i.a., with a payment to the 
Hospital of St. Giles of Norwich of ghd. a year. 

5 Henry V.-ln this fifth year they had a suit with the prior and convent of Norwich 
about their court lete in Carhowe and Trous. in which the nuns prevailed, but not without 
much trouble and expense. The prioress herself went twice to London about it, and the 
charges of the suit came to upwards of i;ioo. which they could ill afford, for they were that 
whole sum and somewhat more in debt at the year's end. 

Catton.-Land here was valued at 2s. 4^. in 1291. In the Va/or at 5^- 

Chcdiston.-In 1291 land here was valued at 5^. This is probably Kerdiston. at which place 
the Warrens, patrons of Carrow, had a lordship. 

Coltishall -Robert Everard, Chaplain of Carrow, by his will dated 1449 {^^£'sfer Aleyn, fo. 39), 
gave his tenement called Churches and 20 acres of land here to the prioress. 

Crostweyt.or Crostwick.-The abbey lands here were valued in 1291 at £2 ly.id They 
were probably some of those at Crostwick which were granted with land at Wroxham by 

John de Hecham in ist Edward I. . , • , 

In 1335 the prioress had licence to receive lands here m mortmam which were 

purchased of John de Hecham, and held of her manor of Wroxham.-Blomefield's Norfolk, 

X. 421. 
Duiiham.— Lands here in 1291 were valued at 4^- 6*^- 
Earlham.-The advowson here is said by Blomefield to have been granted by one Ralph de 

ErTham, and confim^ed by another. We find that in 1249 Ralph de Erlham granted 26 

acres of land and the advowson to the prioress in consideration of being received into the 



V 



xxxn 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



XXXIU 



1= 



benefits and prayers of the Church.-/V^/ of Finet, Henry III., No. 1059. Norris says 
they bought of Robert de Erlham in the reign of King John ; but this is probably a 
mistake. The rectory was appropriated to them by John de Gray, Bishop of Norwich, 
and confirmed in 1226 by Thomas de Blondevyle then Bishop. 

In 1451 Margaret Pigott, then prioress, granted the rectory to the Vicar of Elmham, 
see Tanner's MS. 151, fo. 4, copied from the charters of Carhow, penei Nathaniel Axtell, 
Esq. The rectory was subject to the annual payment of £2. 13J. 4/f. to the vicar. It was 
valued in 1291 at ^5. 6j. 8./. In the Valor it was taken at ^3. d*. 8^., and in the 
Minister^ Accounts at ^4. 

Fincham St. Martin.-In 1291 the prioress' holding here was valued at 5^. It would seem to 

have been a portion of the tithes valued afterwards at \y. 4//. 
Framingham.-According to the Book of Aids (1347) the prioress held a manor here. 
Geistwick.— Land here was valued at \s. in 1291. 

Halvergate.-Before 1264 (about l^^f>-Norris) Roger Bigot, Eari Marshal, gave tithes of his 
demesnes here. In 1264 they were confirmed by Simon, Bishop of Norwich. In 1291 
they were valued at lu 6s. Zd., and in the Valor the vicar is memioned as paying a 
pension of £1. los. 

Hardley.— Land here was valued at 2j. in 1291. 

Hecham.— Norris says they were possessed of a small manor called Hecham, near Wrexham, 

and that in 20th Edward I. they obtained a charter from the King of this manor. 
Hellesdon.— Land here was valued at 8j. in 1291. 
Hockering.— „ jf. ^^ 

Hoe or Howe.-In 50th Henry III. John de Ho conveyed by fine {Feet of Fines, Henry III. 
No. 1483) the advowson of half the church of St. Mary of Ho to Magdalen, Prioress of 
Carrow, in consideration of him and his heirs being received for ever into the prayers of 
her church. This is not mentioned in Carthew's excellent account of the Chapel of Ho 
Another account makes out that the mediety was granted by Richard de Hoyland 
(? Boyland.) It seems to have been united to the other moiety in 1405, with the consent of 
the then prioress. 

In the account of Sir Thomas Hare's MSS. in the 3rd Report. Historical MSS 
Commission, 251, there is an undated deed whereby Philip de Burghs granted land in 
"Rowe" to God and St. Mary of Carhowe, for the good of his soul and the soul of 
William, son of Reginald de Warren (97, A 2.) 
Houghton.— Land here was valued at 2s. in 1 291. 

Kirkby Bydon.-Land here was valued at £1. 17s. %d. in 1291. They bought more here of 
Agnes Dowe, widow, isth Richard U.— Norris. 

-Lakenham.-In isth Richard II. Wm. Colyns, capellanus, and others, granted a toft and x^yi 
acres of land, 3 acres of pasture, and ly. ^. rent in Norwich, Lakenham, and Brakendalc. 
In 1 291 this was valued at 4//. 

Ludham.— Land here was valued at 6d. in 1291. 



Lynn.— In 1250 Stephen Travers and Katherine his wife granted land here to the prioress {Feet 
of Fine$, Norfolk, 35th Henry III., No. 1168), and in 1256 the then prioress arranged with 
Richard fil. Peter of Lynn as to the arrears of rent of her house, " Le Wynhous," in Lynn 
{Feet of Fines, Norfolk, 41st Henry 111., No. 1336). In 1291 the value was ly. ^d. 
Dugdale has tenements in " Lynx," an attribute not belonging to his proof reader. 

Melton Magna.-In 1198 Matilda, the prioress, paid 20s. steriing to Robert de Riflai for a grant 
of 7^. rent here {Feet of Fines, loth Richard I., No. 2i8.)« In 1233 Agnes, the prioress, 
acquired land here by fine from John Le Bretun of Hethill.— F.?^/ of Fines, i8th Henry III., 

No. 492. 

In 1291 the holding here was worth £\. igs. 6d., and in the Valor £1. us. od. The 
prioress in 1347 was found to hold one-fourth of a knight's fee here of Hugh Peverel, and 
he of the King {Book of Aids.) It would seem to have been held of the manor of 
Hethersett, at 4J. yeariy ; and it also paid 4^. a year to the bailiff of Humbleyard 
Hundred.— Valor Ecdes. 

Middleton (an old name for Melton Magna). Land here in 1291 was valued at td. 

Narborough.— Land here in 1291 was valued at 2j. 

Newton.— Land here in 129 1 was valued at 2s. ■ 

Norwich.— Besides the land in the fields of Norwich given to King Stephen, mentioned ante, 

he gave them — 

1. The Rectory of All Saints by Timberhill, in Bere Street. [The prioress also held 
land here, Blomefield's Norfolk, iv. p. 134.] Margaret, wife of Ralph Pigot, and possibly 
mother of the abbess of that name, was buried here in 1453.— /<J/V/., p. 438- 

2. The Rectory of St. Catherine, or St. Winwaloy \in Newgate.— Norris.^ [The 
nuns presented till 1349, when the parish was almost depopulated by the great pestilence, 
and the church was made a chapel only.- -Blomefield's Norfolk, iv. p. 143.] 

3. The Rectory of St. Julian^ in Conisford. [Norris says that out of this rectory 
they had a pension paid them of bs. Sd. per annum, which they ceased to demand in the 
beginning of Edward IV. on account of the meanness of the rectory]. In the churchyard 
wa^s the anchorage of Julian the recluse of Carrow.— Blomefield's Norfolk, iv. p. 81. At 
vol. ii., p. 547, is a statement that Lady Cecilia de Howe, prioress in 1296, built a house 
here for the prioresses on the land formerly given them by Walter de Posswich ; but that 
it was sold to William \'iriy about 1300 for a rent of 6s. 

Besides these they held another rectory here, viz. :— 

4. St. Edward. Granted ante 1269, when the prioress presented. It was afterwards 
held with St. Julian. In this parish they also had a pittance of 2s. a year (out of a 
messuage) granted them by Walter the chaplain, temp. Henry III. 



• Blomefield says it was at Algarsthorp by Melton. 

» The rectory of St. Anne was granted by the city and added to this rectory.- BlomefieM's Norfolk, 

iv. p. 78. 



XXXIV 



Ciirrou Abbey: Appendices. 






They also held property in — 

5. St. John the Baptist and Holy Sepulchre in Ber Street, granted ante 1861, when 
Julian the prioress leased land here to Thomas, son of Stanard de Trowse.— Blomefield's 
Norfolk, iv. p. 137. Norris says they held a close called St. Catherine's Close in the 
parish of St. Catherine in NorAvich, in the Lete Rolls said to be in this parish. 

6. St. Peter Permountergate. See Blomefield's Norfolk, iv. p. 102. 

7. St. Mary the Less. Granted in 1252, It consisted of a rent of 2s. issuing out of a 
house in this parish, afterwards paid by the Cellarer of Norwich.— Blomefield's Norfolk, 
iv. p. 120. 

8. St. John Timierhill.—BlomefiM's Ncrfolk, iv. p. 128. 

9. St. Peter Southgate. Part of Botelers Hills here granted by Hubert de Hoe and 
Agnes his wife, and Thomas the Fellmonger and Isabel his wife. In the grant by the 
latter there is mention of a windmill on that part of it which reached the city ditch. 
These were confirmed by Sabrina Prat, for the good of the souls of Sibraund her father 
and Maud her mother. 

The prioress also held most of the rest of these hills from the gift of King Stephen. 
In 1521 she leased them to the city for ever at ioj. a year.— Blomefield's Norfolk, 
iv. p. 69. 

In the nth Henry VII., the corporation of the city of Norwich, unjustly and by force 
(as the rolls of the convent say) took from them a piece of pasture, within the walls of the 
city, called Botelers Hills, by which rolls it does appear that the nuns had all along 
peaceably enjoyed it, and it was now let by them at the rent of loj. per annum. The city kept 
possession of these pastures against the convent, until the 13th Henry VIII., in all which 
time there is a constant entry every year upon the bailifTs account roll of this unjust 
seizure and detainure, but at length convinced, I suppose, of the injury they had done to 
the convent, they came and took a lease of the said pastures, called Botelers Hills, from 
the prioress and convent, at the rent of \os. per annum, which was the last and greatest 
rent the convent had received for it. This lease was dated the 27th of May, 13th 
Henry VIII., but it is not said in the roll for what term it was made, but in all probability 
it is long since expired. The city paid also other rents to Carhowe for several stalls in the 
market, and other buildings there, and in other parts of the zWy.— Norris. 

10. St. £"///^/^m/.— Blomefield's Norfolk, iv. p. 76. 

11. St. Mary Unbrent. Before 1290 Sir Richard de Boyland assigned a house 
adjoining the south side of the church here. In 1290 Amabilia de Ufford, the then 
prioress, granted it to the Friars Preachers to be laid into their site. 

12. They also had 8 acres by the monastery church, and ds. rent in Norwich, 
granted to them by Robert, son of John de Stamford, to find a lamp burning for ever 
before the altar of St. Catherine in the nuns' church. 

13. A toft, 14^ acres of land, and 3 acres of meadow in Norwich, Lakenham, and 
Bracondale, and 13J. 4^/. rent granted them in 139 1 by William Colyns and others. 

The total value of the Norwich property was ^14. \ts. \\\d. in 1291. 
Norris says they also held 9 or 19 acres of land (I know not which, all the rolls which 
I have seen being erased in that place, and altered from 19 to 9) abutting upon the 






Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



XXXV 



Spittlecoats, divers lands and limekilns without Beresstreet Gates ; also 2 acres of land in 
Heyham, lying just upon Needham Gates, now called St. Stephen's Gates, 5 acres of land 
in Chaplefield Croft, a garden in St. Peter's of Mancroft, and another in St. Augustine's. 

Poringland. — Land here valued in 1291 at 5J. 

Rackheath.— Ditto, at £2. is. yl. (Probably part of that land here granted with Wroxham by 
John de Hecham in i8th Edward I.) 

Ranworth.— Also probably part of the same land. 

Redenhall. — Land here valued in 1291 at 6^. 8^. 

Rockland.— Ditto, £\. iZs. ^\d. In the Valor dX £1. 4J. 

Ruston (Riston.)— The tithes of the demesne of the manor of Barshall here, valued at icw., 
were granted by Reginald de Warren and Alice his wife, as in Stow Bardolf. 

Norris adds : — " In the loth Edward I., the prioress and convent had a tedious suit 
•• with Robert de Benhall, Rector of Riston juxta Fordham, concerning the tithes of 
" Barshall before mentioned. It was long carried on in the Bishop's Court here, till it was 
"removed by the said Robert, who brought a prohibition out of Chancery- ; but the event 
"shews it was .it length determined in favour of the nuns. In process of time these 
"tithes were turned into a payment of xos. per annum." 

Salhouse.— Land here valued in 1291 at 14J. jd. 

Saxlingham. — Ditto, 2J. 

Seaming —Ditto, ^3. os. 4^. 

Shottisham. — Ditto, 6j. 

Starston. — Ditto, is. 2d. 

Stow Bardolph. — The possessions here were valued at £1. in 1291. 

Before 1273 (Norris says at the end of Stephen or beginning of Henry II.) Reginald 
de Warren * and Alice his wife, daughter and heiress of William de Wormegay, gave the 
advowson here, together with land in Ruston [q-v.) The church was afterwards 
appropriated to the nunnery about 1240, and had a vicarage endowed. About 1273 the 
gift was confirmed by William de Warren. He also, when his sister Muriel became a nun 
at Carrow, gave a messuage and 40 acres at Stow. In 3rd Richard II. they had a suit 
with the vicar about tithe wood. — Norris. 

At the time of the Valor the estate paid 3^. ^\d. to the manor of Stow Bardolf. 
\Vhcn the Minister's Accounts were taken (28th Henry VIII.) the land, farm, and 
perquisites of cows were valued at 12s. 8V., £Z. os. lod., and 3J. 2d. The church was 
valued in 1291 at £8, but at the time of the Valor at £7. 2s. Sd. only, and in the Ministers' 
Accounts at £6. ly. 4d. 



M 



• He was a younger son to the second Earl of Warren. 



XXXVl 



Carroiv Abbey: Appendices. 



Car row Abbey: Appendices. 



XXXV 11 



Surlingham.— In Easter, 31st Edward I., the prioress had a suit about the advowson here with 
Hubert de Multon, son of Matilda de Multon {Abb. Plac. pp. 250-1), who had apparently 
granted it to the abbey (Blomeficld's Norfolk, v. p. 463). The prioress had a patent to 
appropriate the church in 22nd Edward II. {Pat. 2nd pt., m. 7). It was worth ^. ^. in 
1291, and £,\. 2s. 4//. at the time of the Valor, and gj. when the Afinister^ Accounts were 
taken. Norris says they obtained the ad\ owsons of Surlingham St. Mary and St. Peter, 
which they afterwards got appropriated, and were possessed of them in the 26th of Edward 
I. In the 23rd of Edward III. they paid to William de Blikling, vicar of Erlham, 20s., for 
an anniversary to be celebrated for the soul of the rector of Surlingham ; which shews that 
Surlingham was not then appropriated, but in the 29th of the same reign I find it then 
certainly was. In the 20th Henry VI. they had an expensive suit with the vicar of 
Surlingham, but what it was about or what was the event of it I know noi.— Norris. 

Swerdeston.— In 30 Henry III. (1246) the priory purchased the advowson here of William Fitz 
Ralph, and it was appropriated to them the next year by Walter de Suffield.— AVrm. In 
1291 it was valued at £6. ly. 4</. In the Valor the vicar is mentioned as paying a pension 
of £i. 3J. 4^. There was also land here valued at 2.f. in 1291. 

Thurlton, or Thurverton.— The prioress had land here worth is. (nl, and in 1291 at 2s. 

Torpinges Mersh.— In 1206 Matilda, the then prioress, had a grant of this marsh (the locality 
of which is not stated) from Richard, son of Ranulph de Rissemer (Rushmorei*)— /V^/^ 
Fines, 8th John, No. 352 — the consideration being the rcgrant of the west half at 12//. 
yearly rent. By two other fines (Fines of Unascertained Counties, in 8th John, No. 50- 
51) Richard, son of Ranulph de Disse, merchant, is said to have conveyed the same. 

Totyngton.— Emmora de Mora in the reign of John granted to them for the health of her soul 
and the souls of her ancestors and successors a rent of 2s. here. — AVr; />. It was valued in 
1291 at 2 J. 

Trowse. — See Bracondale. 

Ugehale [Wigenhale?]— Land here valued at 2s. 

Whitlingham. — Ditto, y. iid. 

Winch, East.— The church here was given by Ralph le Strange, fourth son of Roland le 
Estrange, of Ercall, Shropshire, and he was dead before 1194. He had a daughter 
Matilda, who married Fulk d'Oiri (Carthew's Launditch i. p. 140) and was probably aunt 
to Matilda le Strange, the prioress. It was appropriated to them about \2^o.— Norris. 
They also had a small manor here. In 1291 the value was (fo. i6s. 8d., but at the time of 
the Valor £i. 6s. 8d. only, and in the Minister^ Accounts £,^. ly. 4//. 

Wreningham Magna.—Land here valued in 1291 at td. Simon de Elsingham, Prior of 
Norwich (1233- 1257), confirmed an interest to them here.— AVr/V. The mediety of the 
rectory was granted to the priory before 1306 by . . . Thorp of Ashwellthorp. In 1325 
the rector of Wreningham paid the abbess a quarter of wheat for their portion of tithes 
here.— i\V»rr/j. In 1414 Edith, the then prioress, granted it to Sir Edmund Thorp. 



Wroxham.— The Wroxham estate was by far the most important one belonging to the abbey," 
and Norris says the abbess had a sort of country seat here. It was held of the Honour of 
Horsford at the Castle Guard rent of y. ()d. 

Agnes (tie Monte Caniso), one of the prioresses, had a sub-infeoffment of the manor, 
with the chapel of Salhouse {Norris) from Margaret de Cheyney, one of the daughters and 
coheiresses of William de Cheyney (founder of Sibton Abbey), who held it, at the time of 
the Lib. A'/^. Scac. 1 167, of Hubert de Rye, the tenant in capite (see note *). 

This Margaret married Hugh do Cressy, and the latter's son Roger, in loth Hcnr\' 
III., confirmed his mother's gift of the manor and advowson by fine in 19th Henry III. 
(see Feet 0/ Fines, Nor/., Henry III., No. 617). She is also said by lilomeficld (x. p. 474) 
to have given the advowson of Wroxham to the priory. 

The Roger de Cressy just named married Isabel de Rye, daughter and coheiress of 
Hubert de Rye, the superior lord, but his four sons by her dying without issue, Alina de 
Rye, who married John le Mareschall,* succeeded to the whole of the barony. This Alina 
had a daughter named Alice le Marshall, otherwise Alice de Carrow, who was verj- 
probably from her alias a nun of this foundation. The connection of the families is better 
shown in the pedigree following. 

"De Cheyney" and '• De Monte Caniso"* have been assumed by some to be the 
same surname, and if so it is possible that Agnes the prioress may have been daughter or 
other kinswoman of the Margaret the donor. 

In 1221 Matilda, the then prioress, had a grant of land here from Alexander de 
Wrokesham.— /V^/ of Fines, 6th Henry III., No. 130. 

In 1236 Agnes the prioress had a grant of land here and in " Sallus" from Roger de 
Boyland and Matthew fil. Ralph.— /v<r/ 0/ Fines, 21st Henry III., No. 655. 

The next year the prioress arranged with the Abbot of St. Benet's as to the fishery' of 
Wroxham, Belaugh, and WovoX.O'a.—Fect of Fines. 22nd Henry III., No. 673. 

About 1272 we find from the Hundred Rolls (i. p. 525) that the prioress had 



• Wroxham at the time of Domesday belonged to Ralph de Beaufoy, who held it in capile. Like the 
rest of his property it came to the De Rye family -no doubt by marriage, though how has never yet been 
satisfactorily shown. Agnes de Rye grantctl (/a.) the tithes of the manor to the Prior of Norwich, hut the 
remainder of the liolding in chief long followed the descent of the Rye barony. By an inquisition ad 
quod dam., lOlh Edward III. (printed in Monasticon, iv. p. 72 b), it was found that the prioress held of 
Eva, daughter and heiress of John de Clavering, and she of Robert de Morley (then Laron of Rye) and he 
of the king. Again, when the Book of Aids was compiled in 1347, the prioress is said to hold Wroxham 
at a knight's fee of John Clavering and he of William Mareshall (then Baron of Rye), and he of the 
king. Agrin, in 3rd Henry IV. (1401 -2) the prioress is said {Bl. x. p. 475) to hold one knight's fee of the 
Barony of Rye. 

» John Marescall paid ;^ioo for the custody of the land there of Nicholas Karion.— Fine Roll, I9lh 

Henry III., 1234. p. 269. 

« William de Muntchensey gave the two parts of the tithes of Bergh Apton to the abbey. 

• See also Coram Rege Inh. . . . Edward I. as to a separate fishery at Flagsdam in Wroxham. 



V 



^JJl 



— «-. .L.;* - 



i 



XXXVIU 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



appropriated to herself the river, which ought to be a common one between "Wymene" 
and Wroxham, and also (p. 450) warren at Wroxham. 

In 14th Edward 1. the prioress was summoned to show by what right she claimed 
warren, tumbrel, view of frankpledge, and assize of bread and ale here : in reply to which 
she preferred the charter of Henry III. giving the abbey those rights in aU its manors.— 
Plac. de quo 'warranto, p. 495. 

In i8th Edward I. there is an inquisition (No. 89) nd quod damnum John de Hecham 
for the Prior and Convent of Carrow of lands here, and in Rackaye, Crostwayt, Beeston, 
Bastwick, Blofield, and Ranworth. The Wroxham property was valued at the Taxatio 
Eccl. (19th Edward I.) at ^20. i6j. l\d. 

In 35th Edward I. there is another inquisition (No. 136), Nicholas son of Thomas le 
Clerk, for the nuns of Carrow, of a messuage, 28 acres of land, and 4 acres of marsh 

here. 

" In the 3rd of Edward II. the prioress and convent had a suit about their waters at 
"Wroxham, and in the 5th Edward II. they obtained of Sir John de Clavering, Knight, a 
"new charter for their manor of Wroxham, confirming and amending their old ones, for 
"which they paid him /lo. This Sir John was Lord of Horseford and great great 
"grandson to Robert Fitz Roger and Margaret de Cheineto before mentioned."— AT^rr/j. 

In the 9th of Edward III. they had a dispute about some rights in Wroxham with the 

Lord Morley. 

In 1335 the prioress apparently bought back the interests of her sub-tenants, the De 
Hechams, and some deeds relating to the sub-infeoffment and re-purchase will be found 
printed for the first time in the Appendix. The inquisition ad quod damnum (loth 
Edward III., 2nd Nos., No. 3) is printed in Dugdale, and shows that the land extended into 
Wroxham, Rackheath, Crostweyt. Beeston, Bastwick, Blofield, and Ranworth. 

When the Valor Eccies. was taken in 26th Henry VIII. the rectory" of Wroxham 
cum Salhouse was valued at £7 and the rents at ^30. 15 J. This estate was given at the 
dissolution to the Duke of Norfolk, who parted with it to Sir Miles Corbet. The church 
was subject to the yearly payment of ^i. \os. to the Cathedral Church of Norwich, and 
£\. ly. A^- to the Vicar of Wroxham. 
Yarmouth, Great.— Land valued at £z. los. 5^. in 1291. 



« The church had been appropriated to the Priory by Bishop Blondev)'le and confirmed by William 
Fitz Odo (1226-1235). 



Carroiu Abbey : Appendices. 



XXXI X 



APPENDIX XI. 



Pedigree of the Founders of Carrow and other Priories. 



Robert de Cadomo,= 
otherwise Fitt Walter 
[with his wife, founder 
of Benedictine Priory 
of Horsham St. Faith's.] 



r • • • • 
• Sybilla de 
Cheyney. 



Wm. de Cheyney 
[founder of 
Priory of Austin 
Canons of 
Cox/or J. '\ 



Robert de Tony 
[foamier of 
Bdvoir Priory.^ 



Hubert de Rye I.=f= 
of Rye near 
Falaise in Nor- 
mandy, vix 1044. 



William de Cheyney qp 

(founder of SU>ton.'\ 
leld a knight's fee of 
Hubert de Rye in 
1167 {Lib. Nig. Sc.) 
and had grant of 
Hingham Manor. 



r 



I — 

Hubert =t= 
de Rye 
II. 



Agnes de Tony,=T= Hubert de 



Robert Fitz Roger = 
[founder of Priory 
of black Canons 
of Langley.^ 



probably widow of 
Wm. de Beaufoy, 
Bishop of Thet- 
ford, gave Hors- 
ham to Salisbury 
[founder of Aldby 
Priory.^ 

I 

Margaret de Cheyney =f 

[gave Wroxham to 

Carrow Abbcy^ ante 

19 Hen. III. 



Rye III. 

[part founder 
of Aorzui{k 
Priory.'] 



Albreda^ Peter de 
de Rye Valoines. 
[found- 
ress of 
Binham 
Priory. \ 



1 

Robert 

de Rye, 

a bishop. 

n 



Twii 
others. 



Eudo de Rye 
[founder of 
St. John's 
Abbey, Col- 
chester.] Gave 
Postwick tithes 
to Nonvich. 



I 
Hugh Henry de Rye [g.ive 
de Deopham to monks at 

Cressy. Canterbury and As- 
lackby to Belvoir.] 



Hubert de Rye=rAve- 



IV. [gaveKines- 
thorp to Noni'ich 
Cathedral and 
Hockering and 
Bergh to South- 
7vark Priory.] 



lina. 



Hubert de Rye V.T=Margt., da. of Wm. Fitz Roceline. 



2 I I 

Roger deCressy= Isabel de Rye [foundress = Geoffrey 

[confinned of Priory of Black Canons de 

Wroxham to of Beeston] d. 49 Hen. HI. Chester. 

Carrow 

19 Hen. III.] 



Alina=f=John le Marescall, who was 
de nephew to Robert Fitz Roger. 

_^J . 



Alice de Carrow. 



John. 



1 

William. 



Car row Ablcy : Appendices. 



xll 



xl 



C arrow Abbey: Appendices. 



APPENDIX XII. 



Notes on Carrow Priory, Norwich, communicated by R. Makilwaine 

PHIPSON, F.S.A., F.R.I.B.A. 



[Reprinted from the Transactions of the Norfolk and Norwich Archaological Society, vol. ix. pp. 215-225. 

I have no intention of giving anything hke an exhaustive account of Carrow Priory, 
or, as it is better known, Carrow Abbey, although no abbess ever presided over this 
establishment. A prioress was somewhat inferior in dignity to an abbess, but the distinction 
between them was small. Anyone desirous of going fully into the history of the priory, its 
foundation, the names of its successive prioresses and anchoresses, its endowments and grants, 
its revenues and gifts, the benefices in its patronage, the burials in its precincts, its grants for 
burning lights before the images of S. James and S. Christopher, will find all fully set out 
in Dugdale, Blomefield, and other historians. To rake up and reproduce what I can from 
books is not my object. I simply propose to describe the arrangement of the buildings, so far 
as they have now been laid open, with their use, age, and date. I say, so far as they have 
been laid open, because, although Mr. Colman has been most liberal in sparing no expense in 
the work of discovery, yet for several reasons it has been impossible for him to lay bare the 
entire ruins. Some of the buildings stood in the gardens of an adjacent residence, whilst 
others, especially the hospital, were situated in a part of the grounds which it would have been 
inconvenient to dig over. All archaeologists, however, must feel grateful to Mr. Colman for 
what he has done ; and the painstaking manner in which Mr. King, an assistant at the Carrow 
Works, superintended the laying open of the ruins should not be unacknowledged. 

Although I shall not enter into any detailed history of the priory, yet I must briefly state 
its rise and fall. There was a hospital here in the time of King Stephen, and perhaps earlier, 
dedicated to S. Mary and S. John. We know that Stephen gave lands and meadows to Seyna 
and Leftelina, two of the sisters, in 1146; and it is stated that they founded a new'' priory, 
from which we may presume that there was some institution of the kind here before. 

At this time there were nine Benedictine black nuns, who were endowed according to 
Dugdale with £,6^. its. (xi. per annum, but according to Speed with £Z\. \2s. id. This was 
exclusive of their lands, which doubtless were valuable, making up a fairiy good income, 
considering the then value of money. There was in 1 199 a grant to the nuns of a fair for four 
dayS: which doubtless added considerably to their income. 



' Blomefield, vol. iv. p. 525. 



I 






After a long series of ups and downs, which I need not stop to mention, the last prioress 
but one was Isabella Wygun. During her time the house now occupied by Mr. Tillett, M.P., 
was undoubtedly erected. There are rebuses of a Y and a gun carved on a beam and some of 
the oak panelling still extant, clearly indicating its date. The last prioress was Cecily 
StaflTord. She was pensioned at the Dissolution, in the reign of Henry VIII., on £s per 
annum. There were twelve nuns at the Dissolution, and it is said that they kept for many 
years before a school for the higher class of young ladies. Old Fuller, speaking of such 
establishments in nunneries says, " they were good Shee Schools wherein the Girles and Maids 
of the Neighbourhood were taught to read and work ; and sometimes a little Latine was taught 
them therein. Yea, give me Leave to say, if such Feminine Foundations had still continued, 
provided no Vow were obtruded upon them, haply the weaker Sex might be heightened to 
a higher Perfection than hitherto hath been attained." 

With these brief remarks on the history of the prior>' 1 pass on, simply reminding my 
readers that it may be taken generally that it existed from the middle of the twelfth to the 
middle of the sixteenth centuries, or about four hundred years. 

The ruins that have now been exposed have been lying neglected and unknown for nearly 
three centuries and a half. Blomefield had no knowledge of their exact position, and says, 
" it is now so totally demolished, that there are no apparent ruins." Until the excavations 
were undertaken last year, no one was acquainted with their form and extent. Now that the 
walls are exposed, being composed as they are of rubble, flint, and half-rotten mortar, I fear 
they will soon perish by the action of the weather. It therefore behoves us to take particular 
note of them, so that if we cannot hand down to our successors the ruins as we found them, 
we may transmit on paper their form and description as accurately as possible. 

My old friend and assistant, Mr. W. G. Wallis, has, by the kind permission of Mr. Colman, 
taken a most accurate plan of all that has been exposed. On this skeleton I have tried to 
build up, in the best way I can, some of the parts wanting. Here I may mention a fact which 
I think frequently escapes general notice. It is that our ancestors were just as prone to pull 
down, alter, add to, destroy, or rearrange their buildings and churches as we are at the 
present day, and that the sin of vandalism belongs to no particular generation, but to all. 

The ruins at Carrow are clearly of many different dates, from the twelfth to the sixteenth 
centur)'. This makes it much more difficult to mark out clearly the original plan of the 
priory — a plan constantly being altered from century to century. The Benedictines, the 
Franciscans, the Pramonstratensians, the Cistercians, the Carthusians, and other orders, 
had to a certain limited extent their own particular plan of arrangements, varying slightly 
to suit the different sites, and their own personal whims and fancies, but generally it was only 
slightly they varied. This priory belonged to the Benedictine order, and to their conventual 
arrangements elsewhere we must principally look for a key to these. 

You will notice that the chief feature is the cruciform Church, which was dedicated to the 
Blessed \'irgin and S. John the Evangelist. It consisted of a Nave, loi ft. long by 24 ft. 
3 ins. wide ; North and South Aisles of similar length, 1 1 ft. wide ; a central Tower, 32 ft. 
square on the outside ; Choir and Chancel, 62 ft. 6 ins. by 23 ft. wide ; a South Chapel 
dedicated to S. John the Baptist, and a North Chapel dedicated to S. Catherine. There 
are also North and South Transepts extending 42 ft. beyond the tower and 23 ft. wide. But 



Xlll 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



figures convey little. I can give those who know Norwich a better idea by saying that its 
superficial contents were about one-fifth larger than that of S. Peter's Mancroft. On the 
east side of the south transept is the Sacristy, standing in the same place it does in most 
other Benedictine buildings. The north-east and south walls of this, and the whole of the 
south wall of S. John the Baptist's chapel, have clear indications of having originally been 
outside walls. The plinths run round, and they are what is called faced. The cross east wall 
that now connects the sacristy and chapel together is evidently of fifteenth or sixteenth 
century date, and is not bonded in with the original work. It was perhaps built to form a 
Treasury, or closet. 

The church would appear to have been begun, as was frequently the case, at the east 
end. The chancel and choir, tower, and north and south chapels and transepts, were evidently 
built in the latter part of the twelfth century, or about the time of Seyna and Leftelina, whilst 
the nave and its aisles are of pure Early English date, or the middle and latter part of the 
thirteenth century. The eastern part of the chancel was raised two steps, as can still be 
plainly seen, and the east wall was doubtless filled with three single-light semi-circular-hcaded 
windows in deep reveals. The western part of the chancel, the walls of which were highly 
enriched with stone arcading, several bases of which are still to be seen, contained the choir, 
and it is likely that it extended under the tower. No remnants of woodwork, however, of any 
kind have been found, therefore the position of the stalls, pulpitum, roodscreen, &c., can only 
be guessed at.« The walls of the transepts were also arcaded in stone, and there would appear 
to have been a rubble stone wall-seat all around them, a common feature at that time. 

The base of one pier of the nave, the south-east one, is left very perfect. No foundations 
of the rest remain. They seldom, especially in the Eastern Counties, went far into the ground, 
and not infrequently were actually laid on the crust of the earth. I have shewn on the plan 
a restored arcading consisting of seven bays, which, after consideration and comparison with 
other churches of the same date, I think was the original number. 

Near the west end of the nave is a portion of a cross wall, which is evidently of recent 
date— by recent I of course mean fifteenth or sixteenth century work. The south wall of the 
south aisle and its arcading clearly ran through, and this cross wall is in no way bonded in with 
the old work ; besides, the stone and mortar it is built of is of an entirely different nature and 
quality from the original walls. Opposite this, on the north side, is a lump of the original 
wall, which must have been pitched down in this place when the priory was destroyed. It is 
clearly not in situ, runs parallel with nothing, and is not on its bed, but lies sideways at an 
angle of some thirty degrees. The walls of the north and south aisles were arcaded in stone. 
This returned round the west end;» and when we think of the whole church being thus 
ornamented, some conception of its beauty and richness can be realised. A few of the old 
caps and bases and shafts have been dug up during the excavations, and the contour of their 
design is very good. (See plates of details.) 

Part of the west wall has been rebuilt. Doubtless, originally, there was a large west 



• A few coloured glazed floor tiles are still in situ. 
» The marks of the shafts and some of the bases still remain. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



xliil 



doorway, as I have shewn on the plan. On the south side there were two doorways opening 
into the cloisters, the jambs of which still remain. This is the usual, I may say almost 
invariable arrangement, and they were used mostly for processional purposes. 

How the roofs of the church were constructed no traces are left ; but they had not, I 
think, stone groining. My reasons for concluding so are, that I cannot find any signs of 
abutments strong enough to resist such a thrust, and the walls themselves are comparatively 
thin. In all probability the roofs were of oak and covered with lead. It will be observed 
upon looking at the cardinal points of the plan that the church is far from lying due east and 
west, and the orientation of several churches in East Anglia frequently varies in a similar 
manner. The nave, it will also be noticed, does not run in an exact line with the chancel, but 
bears away to the north about i ft. 6 in. in its whole length. The conventual buildings are 
square with the chancel. 

Much has been written about the mathematical proportions of old churches, and a good 
deal which is purely chimerical to my notion has been advanced. However, in this case, if 
the entire church is divided into ten parts, six-tenths of it is the exact distance from the 
centre of the tower to the inside of the west wall of the nave, and four-tenths the length from 
the same point to the inside east wall of the chancel, whilst three-tenths gives the length of 
the south transept, and it is fair to presume that the north transept was the same. I merely 
state this for what it is worth. Having no elevation to go by, it is impossible to work out the 
theor>' to its full extent The proportions given I believe bear out to an inch. 

On the north side of the chancel was the Chapel of S. Catherine, the north wall of which 
appears to have been pulled down, and for some reason the building extended further, 
probably for secular purposes. Under some of these walls were found three circular dry wells, 
from lo ft. to 12 ft. deep, and further westward an oval one, all lined with rubble, flint, and 
bricks. They could not have been water wells, for the well was discovered close by (see plan), 
and is 34 ft. deep. This is now nearly dry, shewing that the level of the springs has lowered 
during the last four hundred years. For what purposes these buildings were used it is difficult 
to say. Possibly they were occupied by priests who conducted the services of the church. 
Possibly they formed part of the Anchorhold, for many anchorholds were attached to the 
actual walls of churches, and some had one window looking into the church itself. However, 
I am told the tradition is, and I believe it only rests on tradition, that the anchorhold at 
Carrow was situated on the sloping ground to the south-west, near the main road. According 
to Blomefield Lady Julia Lampert was anchoress in 1528. There were several anchorholds for 
recluses in Norwich. One in the churchyard of S. Julian's, another at S. Eti.eldrp'i's, a third 
at S. Peter's Southgate, and others at S. John's Timberhill, All Saints', and S. John's ae Sepulchre. 
Some of the recluses were nuns, but most of them belonged to the priesthood. They withdrew 
themselves from the world for life, and most interesting accounts of their habits and living will 
be found in the Art Journal of 1861, and in The Churchman's Magazine of 1863. 

On the south side of the chancel is the Chapel of S. John, the foundations of which are 
nearly perfect ; and this, like the rest of the church, had arcading round the walls, remnants of 
which still remain. Dugdale and Blomefield, both of whom most carefully chronicle every 
chapel that was ever known to exist in all churches they write upon, mention these two chapels 
only as connected with Carrow Priory church. This is good evidence that no others were 






xliv 



Carrow Abbt-y : Appendices. 



attached to the building. A Lady Chapel there certainly was not, and the church being 
dedicated to the Blessed Virgin might easily account for this. Near the end of the south 
transept a wall was erected somewhere about the fifteenth century. It may have been 
intended to form one wall of a later straight staircase to the library and dormitories above, 
but more probably formed an almonry, or closet. The original staircase was circular, and the 
first two steps of it still remain /;/ siiii on the south-east side of the slype. 

We now come to the domestic and semi-domestic apartments ; and first, as is usual, is the 
slype, or passage, out of which the circular staircase just described leads. The slype formed :i 
communication between the cloisters and outer grounds, and was always placed by the 
Benedictines between the south transept and the chapter-house.* 

Southwards of this was the Chapter-house, running, as is invariably the case, east and west. 
It had undoubtedly a stone-groined ceiling, the central portion of it springing from two circular 
stone columns. The size of this room can be easily arrived at by working out the 
compartments of the groining, and it was evidently a chamber of 38 ft. 4 ins. by 23 ft. It was 
reached by a west door from the cloister. There was a window to the east, and a stone scat 
round the walls. Further south was the Day-room or Common-house. This also had a stone- 
groined ceiling, and had a row of circular columns down the middle, from which the groining 
sprang. There were seven of these, and a portion of one with its base still remains. They can 
be easily traced by the corresponding corbels in the walls, from which the other sides of the 
groining sprung. Over the chapter-house there was doubtless a room which may have been 
used either for the Scriptorium Library or Muniment-room, or it may have been in continuity 
with a long Dormitory, which in all likelihood extended completely over the day-room or 
common-house, but as no remains of any sort exist, this is necessarily conjectural. Any of 
them would be an arrangement more or less in accordance with other monastic establishments. 
The scriptorium was however not infrequently on the ground floor, with the library over it. 
These rooms, whatever they were used for, had unquestionably open oak roofs. 

To the east of these buildings stood the Hospital or Infirmary, the site of which has not been 
excavated. It probably consisted of a day-room or hall, a dormitory with kitchen and offices, 
and was reached by a covered passage, the foundations of the walls of which still remain. 
Projecting from the sides of this passage were the Gongs or Latrines {tiomus necessaria), and 
the ground outside was used as a cemetery, in which there still exist three or four graves. One 
was opened in my presence, and at a depth of about 2 ft. 6 ins. human bones were found, which, 
from their smallness, were, I fancy, those of a female, buried to all appearance without stone or 
wood coffin. The other graves have not, I believe been disturbed. On one is a stone slab with 
a cross, all fairly perfect, and of the latter part of the thirteenth century in character.' 

On the south side of the church, and west of the common-house were the Cloisters, now 
part of Mr. Tillett's garden. In the wall at the north-east comer still remains a holy water 
stoup, and there were doubtless lavatories round, as was usually the case. On the south side 



> A friend reminds me that it was not so at the Benedictine Abbey at Westminster. 

^ The usual place for the Benedictines to buiy in was in the central part of the cloisters. 



'I 



I 






. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



xlv 



of the cloisters were the refectory, kitchen, and offices, with chambers over, and on their west 
side the domus conversorum, for converts, workpeople, and servants, and probably a hall for 
guests. These were pulled down, and in the early part of the sixteenth century Isabella 
VVygun erected the house we now see standing. It consists of a handsome parlour panelled in 
oak, with a fine boldly-moulded oak beam ceiling. Above are bed-rooms, reached by a 
projecting octagon oak turret staircase, all still in good preservation. Few, if any, relics have 
been found, except some small pieces of broken jars, and a few late and not uncommon coins. 

I repeat in conclusion, that I have not attempted to set forth a dry list of facts about 
names, charters, gifts of land, legacies, popes' licenses, and the like. All I have essayed to 
give is a general description of the buildings of Carrow Priory, and to bring before the 
imagination their splendour and extent. Let us try to realise this magnificent church, with its 
spacious cluster of adjacent apartments, their rich arcades and delicately-proportioned 
mouldings, noble piers and arches, lofty and massive tower, windows entirely filled with richly 
painted glass, oak stalls, rood-loft, and screens most beautifully carved, highly glazed and 
ornamental floor tiles, together with altar hangings and other needlework of exquisite design 
and workmanship, and we shall then be able to form some idea of the elegance and 
sumptuousness of the conventual institutions of the middle ages. 



[For Reproductions of the Illustrations to Mr. Phipson's Paper see the next paces.] 



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xlviii 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices, 



APPENDIX XIII. 



The Family of Colman. 



It is singular that the surname of the present owners of Carrow Abbey 
should be found thrice' mixed up with the early history of the place, though I 
believe those whose names so occur were not members of their own family. 

The surname is an old one in Norfolk. There were several "free men" of the 
name when our Norfolk Domesday was compiled. " Colemannus liber homo sub 
Stigando" held land in Forncett {Domesday ^\\. i Sob.) and "Cronkethor" [Crownthorp, 
id. 339 b.] I have heard it suggested that this was only a mis-reading of 
"Cotman," defined by Ellis in his Introduction to Domesday, i. p. 84, as a small cottager ; 
but I do not think so. It comes more probably from Cole-man, a charcoal burner or 
seller — seaborne coal being then practically unknown. It occurs in East Norfolk from 
early times, e.g., John Colman and Roger his brother were parties to a fine of land 
in Aylmerton in the loth John or 1208 (Rye's Feei of Fines for Norfolk, p. 126); 
but the ancestors of Mr. J. J. Colman came from l\Iid-Norfolk — Wymondham having 
been their native place * for over three hundred years. 

The first I can trace there is — 

Robert Colman, who was a party to a fine as to land in Wymondham in Easter, 
3Sth Eliz., 1593. 

feremiah Colman and Edward Colman were parties to another fine of land in 
Wymondham in 12th James I. (161 5), and Edward znA Henry Colman to another in 
the same place in the same year. 

Edward Colman in 2nd Chas. I. (1626-7) ^'^ tenent in a fine; also about 



» Joan Colman of Worstead, by her will dated 1439, gave a legacy to Julian Lampyt, the 
anchoress of Carrow, who is often mentioned in these pages. Richard Colman was a legatee in 

the will of John Chese, a great benefactor to Carrow and Carrow folk, dated 1449 ; and Colman 

was one of the referees as to a dispute between the City of Norwich and the Priory, temp. Henry .... 

* They may have sprung from John Colman and Margaret his wife, who were parties to a fine of 
land in the 19-20 Henry VI. (1441-2) as to property at Thetford. 



Carrow Abbey: Appendices. 



xH: 



Wymondham property, Henry Kett (no doubt one of the rebel's family), being 
petent. His wife was Anne Colman. See a deed relating to this fine set out in Norf 
Top. Manl., p. 196. 

feremiah Colman occurs in 7th Charles I. (163 1-2), as party to another Wymondham 
fine, as does Edward Colman, probably the last named. 

Henry Colman in Michaelmas, 1654, was tenent to yet another Wymondham fine. 

The Wymondham registers show that /t/vw/aA Colman (No. i) by his wife Rebecca 
had a large family, viz., Sarah, baptized 1620; Rebecca, 1623; Elizabeth, 1623; 
Sarah, 1625; Edward, 1627; Mary, 1628; Jeremy, 24th March, i638; Hannah, 1632; 
Nicholas, 1634; John, 1638;' Ruth and Constance, 1639. 

feremy ox feremiah Colman (No. 2), born 24th March, 1630. He became vicar of 
Hethersett, and was buried there 1659. The Register of Marriages for this parish 
contains the following reference :—" Publication of Jeremiah Colman, the son of 
Jeremy Colman and Rebeckah his wife, in Wimondham, and Barbara Tumor, in 
Hayton, daughter of Barbra Whitfoot, widow, in the same town, published Dec. 4, 
II, 18, and the said Jeremey and Barbra were married Decemb. the 20th, 1653." He 
was probably the father of feremiah Colman (No. 3). His funeral sermon is referred 
\o'\n Blomefield, v. p. 29. A copy is in the British Museum (1416, b 26). The title 
is as follows:— "Breach upon Breach, or an acknowledgement of Judiciall Breaches 
made upon us. Procured by Sinfull Breaches Found amongst us, with Instruction, 
Admonition, and encouragement yet to turn to him that smites us, as the sum of it 
was delivered at the Funerall of Mr. Jeremiah Colman, (late Preacher of the Gospell 
at Hetherset in Norfolk) February i8,i65§." By Thomas Moore, Jun. :— It extends 
to loi closely printed pages, and contains over 50,000 words. 

feremiah Colman (No. 3), the son or nephew of Jeremiah Colman of Hethersett, 
by his wife, another Rebecca, had, besides Edward, bom and died 1684; Edward, 
baptized 1685; Sarah, 1688; Jeremiah, 1690, died 1744; Rebecca, 1692; John, born 
1697 ; Frances, 1699, died 1702 ; Mary, born 1702 ; and 

feremiah Colman (No. 4) of Wymondham, kinsman, married Deborah Weaver of 
Crownthorpe, February 6th, 17 16, and had the following issue: — ^Jeremiah, born 1717; 
John, 1718; Susanna, 1720; Ann, 1723; George, born and died 1725; Henry, 1726; 
George, born and died 1730. His wife, Deborah, died 1734. Marrying Esther .... 
as his second wife, the Wymondham Register shows three children born of this 
marriage, viz.: — Elizabeth, 1749; Sarah and George, 175 1. He died 1764, and was 
buried in the Wymondham churchyard. He was probably the Jeremiah Colman of 



» He may be the John Colman of Great Yarmouth, whose will is proved Register Whitton, f. 68 b., 
and who died 1O63, for the latter mentions NVymondham. 



I 



Carrozu Abbey: Appendices. 



Wymondhatn, who voted in the county election of 17 14. At the same election, 
Thomas and William^ Colman, kinsmen, who were then residing at Needham 
Subcourse and Welborne, also voted in respect of land at Wymondham. 

Jeremiah Colman, born at Wymondham, 17 17, and son of Jeremiah and Deborah, 
lived first at Wrenningham. and afterwards at Spooner Row. He had by his wife Mary- 
Jeremiah, who died at Castle Headingham ; Robert, born 1749, and Mary, born 1747 
(married James Barnard of Great Ellingham). He died at the house of his son-in-law 
in 1797, and was buried in the Baptist burial ground in that parish. Mary, his wife, 

died in 1802. 

Robert Colman, born 1749, and son of Jeremiah and Mary Colman, married 
2 1 St July, 1774, Mary Harmer, daughter of Thomas Harmer of Denton, Gentleman. 
The following children were born of this marriage :— Robert, born 1775; Susannah, 
1776; Jeremiah, 1777 (Sheriff of Norwich, 1845-6, and Mayor, 1846-7); Mar}-, 1779; 
Elizabeth, 1780; Samuel, 1781 ; Sarah, 1782; Rebekah, 1784; Ruth, 1787; Hannah, 
1788; Lucy, 1792; John, 1795. He died at Ashwellthorpe, 9th January, 1807, in 
the 58th year of his age his wife, who survived him 19 years, dying in 1826. 

Robert Colman, born 1775, married Ann Mills, 24th October, 1799. He lived at 
Rockland, and died 26th January, 1867, in his 92nd year. He had the following 
children :— James, born 1801 ; Joseph, 1803; Robert, 1804; John, 1806; Jeremiah, 
1807 (whose son, Jeremiah Colman of Gatton Park, Surrey, is part owner of the 
Abbey); Edward, 1808 (whose son Frederick Edward Colman is also part owner); 
Mary Ann, 1809; Sarah, 1811; William, 1812; Henry, 1814; Thomas, 1815; Samuel, 
1816; Barnard, 1818. The brothers were great cricketers, and formed an eleven of 
their own in 1845-6. No doubt it is to this hereditary feeling that the public owe the 
Lakenham Cricket Ground. An account of, and the scores in such matches, and 
of all other matches in which any member of his family ever played, has been printed 
(privately) under the title of "Cricket Records, compiled and arranged by Jeremiah 
Colman, 1845-87." 

James Colman, son of Robert and Ann Colman, born i8th November, 1801, 
married Mary Burlingham, ist August, 1826, and died at Lowestoft, 19th October, 
1854, leaving two children, Jeremiah James, born 1830, and Mary Esther, born 1838. 
He was Sheriff of Norwich, 1849-50. 

Jeremiah James Colman, M.P. for Norwich and Deputy Lieutenant for the county 
of Norfolk, son of the foregoing, was born 14th June, 1830, at Stoke Holy Cross. He 
was Sheriff of Norwich in 1862-3, and Mayor in 1867-8. He married Caroline 
Cozens-Hardy, eldest daughter of William Hardy and Sarah Cozens-Hardy of 
Letheringsett, 25th September, 1856, at Holt. The following children were born 
of this marriage : — Laura Elizabeth ; Russell James (married Edith Margaret, third 
daughter of Richard Davies of Treborih, Bangor, Lord Lieutenant of Anglesea, 



' 



Carrow Abbey : Appendices, 



li 



20th June, 1888); Ethel Mary; Helen Caroline; Alan Cozens-Hardy; Florence 
Esther. 

It is possible that these Wymondham Colmans had a right to bear arms before 
the grant to them. Thomas Colman, merchant and Sheriff of Norwich (i78i),« 
who died 1799, has, "Azure, on a pale radiant or a lion rampant gules," on his 
tomb at Wicklewood (Farrer's Church Heraldry). Fysher Colman, who died 1758, 
has the same coat, with pale rayonee, over him at Great Ellingham ; and John Tawell 
oj Wymondham, who married Mary Colman, also of Wymondham, impales for her the 
same coat on his stone at Southbergh. 

John Colman, Esq., of Brome, was High Sheriff of the county in 17 19. 



* Edward Colman was Shetiff 1795. 



I 







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INDEX RERUM. 



Accounts, 21 

Administration and Management, 7 

Anchoress or Reclusei Juliana the, 7 

Arminghall Hall, The Porch of, said to come from 

Carrow, 24 
Armorial Glass, 29-33 

Benefactors to the Priory, List of, 47, 48 

•« Birthwort," 34 

Boarders, List of, 48-52 

" Boy Bishop," paralleled by a mock Abbess, 12 

Building of the Abbey begun 1 146, 2 

Bull of Gregory X., 4 

Cellaresses, List of, 41, 42 

Certificate of the Guild of the Saddlers and 

Spurriers of Norwich, 5 
Chancel, 24 

Chantry Certificates, 16 
Charter of King Stephen, 2 
Chartulary, 20, 21 

„ Extracts from, App. I., i., ii., iii. 
Choir, The, 24 

„ had no doors, 14 
Clock — none kept, 13 
Confirmation by Henry IIL, 4 
„ by Richard II., 3 

Cross in Market Place, served by the Nuns here, 5 

Day-room, The, 28 
Description of the Ruins, 23-36 



Dispute between the Prioress and Nuns and the 

City of Norwich, 3, 6 
Dormitory, Making of, 4 

Fair, a Four Day one, granted to the Nuns by 

King John, 3 
Favouritism, 9 

Fines relating to the Manor, 17-19 
Foundation, History of the, i 
Founder, Pedigree of the, xxxix. 
Frankpledge, View of, 3 
Free Warren in Wroxham, Right of confirmed by 

Edward I. to the Nuns, 4 
Funeral of John Paston, 8 

Girdles or Belts of Silk used, 14 
Goulbum, Dean, Errors of, i n., 2 n. 
Grant of the Site of the Abbey on its dissolution, 16 
Graveyard, The, 27 

Guild of the Saddlers and Spurriers of Norwich 
held in the Conventual Church, 4 

Hall and Parlour, description of, by Anthony 

Norris, 29-33 
High School, incorrectly said to be held here, 4 

Image of our Lady of Pity, 25 n. 
Income, 37, 38 
Injunctions in 1526, 12, 13 
•> 1532. 15 

Jews, Money borrowed from, 4 



- '^ "" ' -'- •■ ■.. ' . ■pr ^-^ r- Atr- 



Hv 



Canow Abbey: Index Rcnuii. 



■* v » . 



w 



Juliana, the Anchoress, 7 
Jurisdiction, 21 

Lampet, Juliana, 7 

Lands of the Priory, Account of, xxix., xxxviii. 

Law-suit with the Prior and Convent, 6 

Lectern wanted, 14 

Library of Mr. J. J. Colman, M.P., Summaiy of, 

35.36 
Liquor, Thinness of. Complaints at, 12 
Litigation between the Nuns of Carrow and the 

Prior and Convent of Norwich, 3-6 
Loaves, insufficiency of, 9, 10 

Mock Abbess, 12 

Names of the Prioress and Nuns in 1492, 10 

» I532>i3 
Nave, The, 26-7 
Norris MSS., Extracts from, relating to Bull of 

Gregory X., Appendix I., iii. 
Norwich City Records, xi., xii. 
Notes on Carrow Priory by R. M. Phipson, F.S.A., 

F.R.I. B.A., xl.-xlv. 
Nuns, List of Names of, 42-7. 

Originalia, 30th Henry VIIL, xi. 
Our Lady of Pity, Image of, 25 n. 

Parlour, 29 

Pedigree of Founders of Carrow, xxxix. 

" Philip Sparrow," Poem of, written at Carrow,i5, 16 

Phipson, Mr., Account of the Priory Buildings, 23 

Pig, itinerant, 34 

Plan of the Khhty, face 23 

Poem of Skelton on " Philip Sparrow," 15, 16 

Portraits, Engraved, relating to Norfolk, 35 

Printers, Early Norwich, 35 

Prioresses, List of, 38-40 



Recluse or Anchoress, 7 

Report of the "Norfolk Chantry Certificates" 

Commissioners, 16 
Revenues of Carrow, destination of, 1 7 

Sacrists, Lbt of, 40 

Sacristy, The, 26 

Saddlers and Spurriers, Guild of, 5 

St. Catherine's Chapel, 25 

St. John the Baptist's Chapel, 25 

St. Julian, 8 

School, High, supposed, at the Abbey, 4 

Seals, 21 

Skeletons, found at, 27 

Skelton's Poem of Philip Sparrow, 16 

Stained Glass in Hall and Parlour, 29-33 

Staring at the Nuns, 14 

Strength of the Priory, in numbers, 37, 38 

Sub-Prioresses, List of, 40 

Subterraneous Passages, 34 

Suit concerning the Carrow Hills and Pits and the 

City " Recreation Ground," in 21st Charles L, 

19,20 

Tanks, 25 

Tapestry Left to, 25 
Transept, the South, 26 

Veils, Nuns do not wear, 14 

Visions of Juliana Lampet, the Anchoress of 
Carrow, 7 

Visitation of the Ordinary in 1492, 8-10 
M >• •> I5i4> 10, II 

» M » 1526, II, 13 

M M .. 1532, I3«S 

Visit of the Duchess of Richmond in 1544, 17 

Wensum, Deviation of the course of, 24 

Wills relating to Carrow, Extracts from, xiii.-xxix. 



INDEX NOMINUM 



Agges, 48 

Agnes, the Prioress, xxxi.,xxxiii., 

xxxvi. 
Alblastcr, xxviii. 
Alcok, xviii. 
Alderford, 47 
Aleyn, xvi., xxiii. 
Alice . . . . , 48 
Alicocke, xxv. 
Alkok, xxii. 
Alleyn, xxviii. 
Allington de, ii. 
AUyn, 42 
Amby, 48 
Ames, 35 
Ancar, 48 
Aphowell, 9 
Apleyard, 47 
Aquillon, vii 
Argentein, 42 
Asgar, 47 
Aslak, 25, 47, 48 
Aslake, xxix. 
Asshwell, XV. 
Attilburgh, xvi. 
Attmere, xxvii. 
Axtell, 18, 19, XXXV. 
Aylemer, xxiv. 
Aylmer, xxi., xxv. 

Bacon, 17, 29, 48 
Bafyle, 48 
Bainzet, xiv. 
Bakepuz de, vii. 
Baketon de, v. 
Baldwin, 47 
Bale, 35 
Balle, 48, xvi., xvii. 



Balls, xxvi. 

Banyard, xvii. 

Barber, 48 

Barbour, 43, xv., xvi., xix. 

Bardolf, 43, 47, xvii. 

Bardolph, vii. 

Baret, 48, xiv. 

Bam, xiv. 

Barnard, xxviL 

Barowe, 31 

Barret, 31 

Barrowe, 17, 29, 30 

BarjTigton, 42, 43 

Bassingboum, 30, 43 

Bateman, 48 

Baxter, 48, xiv., xxvi. 

Baxtere, xiv, 

Beatrice, 47, 48 

Beaufoy, de, xxxi., xxxvii. 

Bedyngfeld, xviii. 

Bekkles, de, v. 

Belconger, xxv. 

Belet, vii. 

Beloe, 35 

Bello Campo, de, viii. 

Bendysh, 43 

Benhall, xxxv. 

Berdewell, 30 

Berdolf, 49 

Bere, 49 

Bernard, 49 

Bemey, de, xiii. 

Bernham, 47 

Bertram, 43, 47, xvi. 

Betterings, 40, 43 

Bewfeld, xxv., xxvi. 

Bigot, xxxii. 

Biklyng, 43 



Bilney, 49 

Biskele, xxx. 

Biskele, de, xxx. 

Blakene, 49 

Blennerhasset, 32 

Blickling, 4, 47, 49, xxii. 

Blikling, de, xxxvi. 

Blondevyle, xxxii., xxxviii. 

Blyawnt, xxviii. 

Bodham, 47 

Bokenham, 49, xix. 

Boleyn, 16, 31 

Belle, la, xxiv. 

Bolytowth, XX. 

Bonde, xii. 

Boole, xiv. 

Boteler, xxiv. 

Boterell, de, vii. 

Botolf, 12, 13, 14, 43 

Bound, 13, 43 

Bowyer, xxviii. 

Boyland, de, xxxiv., xxxv., 

xxxvii. 
Brabazun, le, viii. 
Bracham, 20 
Bracolee, 49 
Braham, 30 
Brampston, xvi. 
Bramton, 33 
Brandon, 49 
Brasier, xv., xxvii. 
Bray, 49 
Braylles, xx. 
Breos, de, vii. 
Bresyngham, xvii. 
Breten, 43 

Breton, le, 41, xxxiii. 
Brewse, 31 



/ 



IVl 



Cai'roiD Abbey: Index Nominiun. 



Carrow Abbey: Index Nominum. 



Ivii 



Brigham, 47, 49 

Brislee, 49 

Britann, de, viii. 

Brock, de, v. 

Brockdish, de, 7 

Brosyard, xv. 

Brosyerd, 47 

Browne, 13, 43, 49, xxiii., 

xxviii. 
Brownes, 35 
Bruyn, xix. 
Bryst, 49 
Bryton, 43 
Bryton, de, 41 
Bukley, xxii. 
Bull, xxii. 
Bumsted, 49, xvii. 
Bumstede, 47, 49 
Bumstide, 47 
Bunne, 20 
Buntyng, 49 
Burgess, 35 
Burgh, de, 4 
Burghs, de, xxxii. 
Burghward, 43 
Burgo, de, viii. 
Burnham, xxvii. 
Burys, 31 
Butts, 17, 29 
Bygod, viii. 
Bylney, xxiii. 
Byran, xxiv. 
Byshop, xxii. 

Cadonio, de, xxxi., xxxix. 
Caimbrigge, xiv. 
Caltborpe, 30, xxi. 
Calthorpe, de, xiiL 
Cambrygg, 49 
Carhou:je, 43 
Carhowe, 10 
Carlton, 43 
Carlton, de, 39, 4I 
Carpentarius, v. 
Carrow, 1 1, 43 



Carrow, de, xxxi., xxxvi. 

Caster, xxi. 

Catherine, 41, 43 

Catlyn, xii. 

Catt, 39, 43 

Catworth, 5 

Caumbrigge, xix. 

Causton, 43, xxiv. 

Chamberleyn, 49 

Champnes, xxi. 

Cheineto, de, xxxvii., xxxviii. 

Chese, xxii., xxx. 

Cheselden, 49 

Chester, de, xxxi. 

Cheyney, de, xxxi., xxxvi., 

xxxvii., xxxix. 
Chirchman, xiii. 
Chyld, xxiii. 
Chyttok, XX. 
Clarke, 10, 43, xxviii. 
Clavering, de, xxxvii. 
Claxton, XXV. 
Clere, 31, 49, xxi. 
Clerk, II, 49, xxiv., xxvii. 
Clerk, le, xxxvii., xxxviii. 
Clifton, 30 
Cobbe, xxix. 
Cockfield, 31 
Coke, 35 
Cole, xxiv. 
Colich, xxiv. 
Colman, 19, 27, 34, xiv., xvi., 

xix. 
Colyns, xxxii., xxxiv. 
Cook, 47, xxiii. 
Corbet, xxxvii., xxxviii. 
Comwallis, 17, 30 
Comwayle, xiv. 
Corpusty, xxvi. 
Cothferth, 49 
Cotman, 36 
Couteshall, 49 
Crancumb, de, viii. 
Cratyng, xvii. 
Crepping, 43 



CreppJng, de, 41 

Cressy, de, xxxi., xxxvi.. xxxvii., 

xxxix. 
Crew, 20 
Creyk, 49 
CroflFts, 49 
Croftys, xviii. 
Crome, 36 
Cross, 49 
Cubett, xxvii. 
Cubytt, 47 
Curson, 43 

Dade, xxvi. 

Dain, 49 

Dam, 49 

Dancaster, xiii. 

Daniell, 36, 49, xiii. 

D'Argentein, 41 

Davy, 49, xviii. 

Deincourt, 30 

Delapole, 30 

Depham, 49 

Despenser, le, viii. 

Deve, 47 

Dispenser, iv. 

Di.sse, de, xxxvi. 

D'Oiri, xxxvi. 

Donham, xxv. 

Donne, 43 

Dowe, xxxii. 

Dowes, 25, xiv. 

Downe, xiii. 

Drake, 49, xxiv., xxv., xxvi. 

Draper, xxiv. 

Drewry, 30, xviii. 

Drinkwater. 19 

Drolle, xvii., xxiv. 

Drury, xxv. 

r>unston, de, xvi. 

Dye, 17 

Dykkes, 47, xviii. 

Dykkys, 49 

Edde worth, de, vii. 



Edith, the prioress, xxxvi. 

Edmund, St., de, 39, 41 

Edrj'gge, 8 

Edward I., 4 

Edward III., 4 

Exlwards, 49 

Eliet, xxviii 

Elmham, 49, xiv. 

Elot, 49 

Elsham, xiv. 

Elsingham, de, xxxvi. 

Ely, 43 

Elyhys, 49 

Elyngham, 49 

Elys, 43, 47, 49, xix., XX. 

Emehele, de, v. 

Enges (Euges?), 43 

Erlham, 43, 49, xiv. 

Erlham, de, 41, xxii, xxxi 

Erpingham, 30, 37 

Est, XX., xxvi. 

Estrange, le, xxxvi. 

Eton, 42, 43 

Eton, de, 4 

Euges, de (Enges ?), 39 

Everard, 35, xxii., xxxi. 

Fador, 49 
Famham, 49 
Farwele, xvi. 
Fastolf, 44, 50 
Fastolf, de, 41 
Felbry^e, 47, xvi. 
Felmingham, xxviii. 
Fen, xiv. 
Ferman, xxv. 
Ferrers, 50 

Ferrour, xix., xx., xxvii 
Filby, 50 
Firmacy, 44 
Fiti Odo, xxxviii. 
Fitz Ralph, xxxvi. 
FiU Roceline, xxxi. 
Fiu Roger, xxxi., xxxvii 
FiU Walter, 



Fletcher, 35 

Flynt, 50 

Folcard, 10, 40, 42,44, xv., xvi., 

xvii., xviii., xix. 
Foster, xxvi. 
Foxe, xxiii. 
Foxley, 50 
Fransham, 35 
Frengos, 44 
Frost, 50 
Furbysshour, xx. 
Fumeaux, 30 
Furneys, xx. 
Fyce, XX. 
Fyssher, xxiv. 

Gappe, 42, 44 
Garbald, 42, 44 
Gardiner, xxvi. 
Gardyner, xxi. 
Gameys, xxii. 
Gaudy, 30, xi. 
Gedding, 31 
Geest, 50 
Geffrey, xviii. 
Geggard, v. 
Gernemutha, 47 
Giggs, xxvii 
Gilbert, xx. 
Gloos, 50 
Goche, xix. 
Goldbeter, xx. 
Goldwelle, 9 
Gonvill, 30 
Goodered, xvi. 
Goodnape, 50 
Goodwyn, xv. 
Gosbec, 47 
Gosnold, xi. 
Graby, 13, 44 
Graven, 1$ 
Gray, de, xxxii. 
Gree, 42 

Green, 10, 11, 44, xxi., xxiii., 
XXV., xxvi., xxvii. 



Gregorius, iii. 
Grey, xii. 
Grond, xix. 
Groos, 50 
Groos, le, 41, 44 
Gryme, xxviii. 
Grys, xxiii 
Gules, 29 
Gun, viii. 
Gunmore, 50 
Gunton, xxii. 
Gylbert, xxi. 

Hackford, de, 41, 44 

Hall, 35, 40, XX. 

Hallys, xix. 

Halys, 50 

Hammond, 13, 44 

Hare, xxxii. 

Harling, 30 

Harrowe, xv. 

Hart, xxviii. 

Harvey, xxvii. 

Harydaunce, xxvii. 

Hauk, 50 

Haynes, xxi. 

Hebbes, xx. 

Hecham, 44 

Hecham, de, i., ii., xxix., xxxi., 

XXXV., xxxvii., xxxviii. 
Hedirsete, 44, 50 
Hedirsete, de, 41 
Helyis, 50 
Hemgrave, $0 
Hendy, xxi. 
Heneghye, 50 
Hengham, 47 
Henry HI., 4 
Henry V., 6 
Henry VI., 7 
Henry VIII., 17 
Herefordensis, viii. 
Hervy, 47 
Hetherset, de, 39 
Heveniogham, 29 



J 



1 ••• 

Iviii 



Car row Abbey: Index Nominum, 



Ilevingham, 47 


Katherine, 1 1 


London, 11, 12, 13, 14, 45 


Hewe, 50 


Keech, 44 


xxvii. 


Ileydon, xix. 


Keldon, 30, 32 


Loudam, 32 


Heyham, 50 


Kelling, 47 


Love, II, 30 


Heyne, xxv. 


Kempe, xv. 


Lovell, 30 


Hobert, xxviii. 


Kerbrook, XX. 


Lowdham, 31 


Hockwolde, 50 


Kerdeston, 44, 47 


Lucy, 48 


Ho, de, xxxii., xxxiv. 


Kerre, xsi., xxii. 


Lumhalx (?), xxvii. 


Holbroke, 44 


Kidman, II, 44 


Lyghtfoot, xvi. 


Holbrooke, 47 


King, 44 


Lyhart, xvii. 


Holland, 30 


Kirkeby, de, v. 


Lynsted, xii. 


Holm, de, 39, 44 


Kirkeham, de, viiu 




Holveston, 50 


Kirkpatrick, 21 


Machon, xxii. 


Hopes, 17 


Knight, 9, 44 


Mackay, 35 


Horge, 19 


Koc, 39 


Magdalen .... 38, 45 


Horsley, xxv. 


Kydman, 47, xxix. 


Maloysel, 51 


Hoste, 50, XX. 


Kyng, 42, xvi., xviii., xx., 


Marchale, xv. 


Howard, 50 


xxiv. 


Marescall, le, xxxi. 


Howe, de, xxxiii. 


Kynyngham, 44 


Marescallo, vii. 


Hoyland, xxxii. 




Mareschall, 30 


Hugo, fir, iv. 




Mareschall, le, xxxvi., xxxvii. 


Hun worth, xvii. 


Lampet, 7, 47, xv., xvi., xvii., 


Margaret, the donor, xxxvi. 


Hurj-ngham, 47 


xviii., xix., xx., xxi., xxii.. 


Marke, 31 




xxiv. 


Marker, 48 


Ingham, CO 


Lampet, do, 7 


Marlingford, 48 


' •» 

Inglethorpe, 30 


Lampett, xxvi. 


Marshal, 51 


Intewode, xv. 


Lampyt, xiv., xix. 


Marsham, 33, xxvii. 




Lancastre, xxiii. 


Marten, 13 




Large, xxviii. 


Martin, 11, 40 


Jay, xvii. 


Lawes, xii. 


Martineau, 19 


Jeckys, xviii. 


Leche, xii. 


Martini, viii. 


Jenney, xxiii., xxvi. 


Legg, xxvi. 


Martyn, 10, 45, xxii., xxiii. 


Jemegan, 30 


Lenn, 44 


Mascal, 51 


Jer\es, 12, 13 


Lenn, de, 39, 41 


Ma.ssey, 51 


Jerveys, 10 


Lestelina, 2, xl. 


Matilda, 51 


JervTS, 14 


Lestrange, 38, 44 


Matilda, the Prioress, xxxvi. 


Jer\7s, 44, xxvii. 


Leverich, 47, 48 


Matteshall, xx. 


Joan, 41, 44, xiii., xiv. 


Leyburne, de, viii. 


Mawe, xxiii. 


Joan, the prioress, xix- 


Lightfoot, 44 


May, 17, 18, 20 


John, XXX. 


Lindley, 35 


Mayhue, 51 


Josse, xxiv. 


Lockwood, XX. 


Meek, 34 


Joye, xvi, xvii. 


Lodnes, 45 


Mego, xxviii. 


Julian, Lady, 8 


Lombe, xv. 


Mellers, 31 


Julian, the Anchoress, xiv., xv., 


Lomnour, 48 


Mere, xxvi. 


xvii., XX., xxii. (see I-ampet) 


Lond, 45 


Merk, de, viiL 



Carrow Abbey: Index Nominum. 



li: 



Methelwold, 48 

Michfield, 51 

Middleton, 51 

Moles, de, iv. 

Monk, 51 

Montchensy, 45 

Montchensy, de, 38 

Monte Caneisi, i. 

Montecanieso, de, 38 

Monte Caniso, de, xxxvi.,xxxvii. 

Monte Feranti, vii. 

Mora, de, xxxvi. 

Moreton, 19 

Morley, 30, 31, xvii., xx., xxiv., 

xxxvii., xxxviii. 
Morley, de, xxxvii. 
Mortimer, 30 
Moulton, 45 
Mounford, xxvii. 
Mowbray, xxx. 
Mowting, 51 
Mowtyng, xxi. 
Multon, xvi. 
Multon, de, xxxvi. 
Munchensy, xxis. 
Mundham, de, v. 
Muntchensey, de, xxix., xxxvii. 
Mymt, 51 
Myntan, 48 

Necton, xii. 

NeketoD, xx. 

Neve, le, 21 

Newmarch, 45 

Nichol, 48 

Norfolk, Duke of, 1 7, xxxviii. 

Northalis, xx. 

North wold, $1 

Norwich, 45, 51 

Norwych, xv., xvii. 

Notell, xxvii. 

Novo Foro, 45 

Nycbe, xxiv. 

Ode, XV. 



Oldbarly, 51 
Ordeyner, 51 
Osbert, Fitz, 30 
Osborne, 51 
Oudolf, xviii. 
Oxneye, 51 



Pagrave, xxv. 
Palmer, 42, 45 
Parke, 41, 42, 45 
Parker, 30, 45, xxvi. 
Pamiiter, 20 
Paryis, xv. 
Parys, xiv., xv. 
Paryssh, xvii. 
Pawe, xxn. 
Peche, iv. 

Pecheforde, de, viii. 
Peinel, 40 
Pennyng, xvi. 
Pepyr, xviiu 
Pemel, 45 
Person, 51 
Pert, xvii. 

Petronilla, 39, 45 

Peverel, xxxiii. 
Phelip, 30 
Philibert, St., 31 
Pigot, xxii., xxxiii. 
Pigott, xxxii. 
Pikrell, v., xi. 
Plomer, xiii. 
Plomere, 51 
Plover, 4 
Plowman, xxiii. 
Plumsted, 41, 45 
Plumsted, de, 39 
Porson, 35 
Porynglond, xviii. 
Posswich, de, xxxiii. 
Pottok, xiL 
Prat, xxxiv. (3) 
Purdance, xix. 
Pygot, 39, 4S> 48, 5« 



Pysott; XV.. xvii. 
Pykcrell, xii. 
Pynnes, xxiv. 
Pyromund, 51 
Pythode, xxvi. 



Quash, xxviii. 
Qweynterell, 51 
Qwhytyng, xiii. 

Raas, xxiv., xxv. 

Rabayne, de, vii. 

Radclyfif, xxv. 

Rafman, 51 

Ramyssey, 51 

Raye, xvii. 

Readham, 51 

Redd, 51 

Rede, 51, xi. 

Reed, 45 

Repond, 51 

Repps, 30 

Reson, 51 

Reyner. xviii. 

Rial, xxi. ;2) 

Riall, 45 

Richard ... $1 

Richard H., 5 

Richmond, Duchess of, 1 7 

Rida, i. 

Riddle, 48 

Ridel, i. 

Ridai, de, xxxiii. 

Rigijy» 35 

Rissemer, de, xxxvi. 

Roceline, Fitz, xxxix. 

Roger, 48, xiii. 

Rogers, xi., xii. 

Rokett, xxvii. 

Roone, xxviii. 

Rose, 51 

Rudham, de, 39 

Ryall, 10 (2), xxi., xxii., xxiv. (2) 

Ryche, xiv. 



'.4 



::^. 



k 



Carrmv Abbey: Index Nominum. 



Rye, de, xxxi. (12), xxxvi. (3), 

xxxvii., xxxix. 
Ryghtwys, xix. 
Ryngolf, V. 



Sancto Amando, de, viii. 

Sankevill, de, viii. 

Sanim, viii. 

Savage, xxii. 

Saxlingham, 51 

Schyrlok, xiv. 

Scott, 8 

Segrave, de, iv., xxx. 

Segryme, 9, 10, 39, 45, xviii., 

XX., xxi., xxiii. (2). 
Sekyngton, xvi. 
Seteman, xiv. 
Sejma, xl. 
Shakeryse, 51 
Sharington, xxi. 
Sheef, xix. 
Shelton, 16, 17, 30, 31, 35, 51, 

xi. (2), xxix. (2}. 
Sherman, 10, 45, xxv. 
Shirley, xxxi. (2). 
Shottesham, xix. 
Simon, xxxii. 
Skelton, 15, 29, 35 
Skipwith, xxi. 
Skottowe, xxviii. 
Skrike, iv. 
Smith, S, 20, 35 
Smyth, 48, 51, xxi. xxiii. 
Snellynge, xxvi. 
Solempne, de, 35 
Southwell, 35, xxi. 
Spalding, 39, 45, xvi., xvii. 
Spaldyng, 40, 42, xxii. 
Sparham, 51 
Sparrow, 15 
Sparrowe, xxv. 
Spendlove, xviii. 
Spicer, 48 
Spr^gy, XV. 



Spycer, 51 

Stafford, 40, 45 

Stains, 45 

Stalon, xxiii. 

Stamford, 48 

Stamford, de, 25, xxxiv. 

Stanley, 19 

Stannard, 36 

Stans, 51 

Stapleton, 31 

Stark, 36 

Staynton, xiv. 

St. Edmund, 45 

Stephen, King, i. 

Sterman, 19 

Steward, 10, II, 12, 13, 14, 19, 

40, 47, xxviii. (2) 
Storm, xix. 
Stow, 51 

Strange, le, xxxvi. 
Strange, le, the prioress, xxxvi. 
Strart, 19 
Stubbe, xxiv. 
Sty ward, 9, 46, xi., xii,, xxiii. 

(2), XXV., xxvi. 
Suckling, 35 
Suffcld, 12, 35, 40, 46 
Suffield, de, 4, xxxn. 
Suldham, 48 
Sustede, xiv. 
Suthefeld, 14 
Suthfield, 13 
Sutton, 35 
Swanten, 13 
Swanton, 12, 14, 40, 46 
Swayn, xxvii. 
Swayne, xxviii. 
Sweetman, xxvi. 
Sweket, 51 
Swetman, xxv. 
Sygryme, 42, 46 
Sylvester, xix. 
Symonds, xxi. 
Synger, 51 
Sywhat, xi., xii. 



Taylor, 19, xviii. 

Taylors, 35 (2) 

Terell, 51 

Thacker, 19, xxv. 

Thelnetham, 46 

Thelnetham, de, 41 

Thomas, 51 

Thomas the Fellmonger, xxxiv. 

Thorn, 51 

Thorp, xxxvi., 51 

Thurkyld, 51 

Thursby, xxvii. 

Thurton, xv. 

Tillett, 27, 28 

Tindall, 32 

Todenham, 46 

Todenham, de, 40 

Toftus, 52 

Tomson, xxiv. 

Tony, de, xxxi. (2), xxxix. 

Tooke, 20 

Toppe, $2, xxi. 

Toppes, 48 

Toppys, 52 

Tostyn, 52 

Tounshend, 48 

Townesend, xi. 

Travers, xxxili. 

Trigat, xii. 

Trimmer, 35 

Trows, de, xiii. 

Trowse, de, xxxiv. 

Tudenham, xviii. 

Turbe, I 

Tumeham, de, vii. 

Tumor, 48 

Tweyt, 46 

Ty,52 
Tyllis, xxvi. 
Tylney, 52 
Tylys, 52 
Tyrrell, 30 

UfTord, 31, 40, 46, 48 
Ufford, de, 3, 39, iiL, xxxir. 



I 



(I 



Carrow Abbey: Index Nominum. 



Ixi 



Ugser, 48 
Underwode, xxiii. 
User, le, xxxi. (2} 
Uvedalc, 31 

Valoines, de, xxxi. 
Vaux, 31 
Veautre, xxii. 
Verley, 41, 46, xiii. 
Vincent, 36, v. 
Virly, xxxiii. 
Vyce, 52 

Wachesam, 52 

Wade, XV. 

Walcot, 48 

WaUh, xxv. 

Walslngham, xviiu, xx. 

Walsyngham, 52 

Walter, xxxiii. 

Walters, xxvii. 

Walthoe, 18 

Warde, xi. 

Warenna, de, vii., viii. 

Wareyn, xxvi. 

Warmale, 52 

Warner, if, 12, 13, 46, xvi. 

Warren, xxxi. 

Warren, de, xxxii., xxxv. (7) 

Waryn, 7, 39, 46, xvii. 

Wasingle, 46 

Waterman, xxix. 

Wederby, 52 



iTeelar, 46 

i^elan, 46, xvi. (2) 

elbum, 52 
kVellisham, 52 

ellitham, 52 
.'ells, 46 
k'ellys, 10 

'endling, 46 
>'endling, de, 39 

eston, xxiii. 

Tetherby, 7, 46, 52, xv. xvii. (2) 
I'ethyrby, xv. (2) 
.'hite, 42, 46, 52 
.'hyght, 10 
k'^hyte, xxi., xxii. 

igan, II, 13 

'ilbey, xvii. 

ilby, 46 
William, 52, xiii. 

illoughby, 47, 52 
IVilton, xxvi. 

inchester, 48 

indeshore, 46 
iVingfield, 30 

'irmgay, 46 

ode, 48, 52 

odehows, lO 
iVoderoue, xv. 

olcey, 52 

olrych, 52 

oode, v., xi. 

oodhowse, 30, 3 1, 46 

oodward, 35 




Wootton, 30 

Wormegay, de, xxxv. 

Wortys, xxiv. 

Wotton, 9 

Wrokesham, de, xxxvi. 

Wryght, 52 

Wurthested, 48 

Wychingham, 30, 33, xviii. 

xxii. 
Wygan, 28, 29 
Wygon, 39, 42, 46, xxix. 
Wygun, 33, xii., xiv. 
Wylasham, de, xiii. 
Wylby, 47, xvi. 
Wylton, 42, 47, 52, XV. (2) 
Wylton, de, 39 
Wyngffeld, xi. 
Wygenhale, xxiv. 
Wyncheston, 47 
W3mdham, xviii. 
Wynt, 52 
Wynter, 52 
Wyntreshull, de, vii. 
Wyth, 47, 52 
Wythmall, xxv. 

Yaxley, 25, xxviii. 
Vermouth, 47 
Yerston, 47 
Yexworth, xxvi. 
Ymb, 52 
Vung, 530 



ikCAS H. COOSB, PRINTER, RAMPANT HORSE STREET, NORWICH. 



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